Beermen hold off Picanto behind Fajardo’s 41 points

first_imgPBA IMAGESJune Mar Fajardo was unstoppable in the fourth quarter and San Miguel Beer edged Kia, 118-112, in the 2017 PBA Governors’ Cup Saturday at Mall of Asia Arena.The reigning three-time MVP scored 20 of his 41 points in the final frame as the Beermen bolstered their bid for a top four finish after climbing to 6-3.ADVERTISEMENT It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson A costly, catty dispute finally settled End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend LATEST STORIES Johnson fired 42 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists to offset his 10 turnovers but the Picanto just had no answer for Fajardo as they dropped their 10th consecutive game.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Learning about the ‘Ring of Fire’ A costly, catty dispute finally settled Winning start End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendcenter_img Fajardo came two points shy of matching his career-high he set in a loss to Alaska in the 2016 Philippine Cup.Terrence Watson added a double-double with 16 points and 14 rebounds while Chris Ross collected 15 points, six assist and five steals for the Beermen, who trailed by six at the end of the third period.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogThe Picanto had lost their first nine games but played nothing like a winless team against the Grand Slam-seeking Beermen.Kia, led by its explosive import Geron Johnson, kept itself in the game until Alex Cabagnot made a layup to put San Miguel ahead by six, 116-110, with only 15 seconds left. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. La Salle outguns NU for 2-0 start Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Break new ground OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

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NCAA: St. Benilde cuts down Arellano, doubles win total from Season 93

first_imgGov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college College of St. Benilde’s Cinderella story is far from over after it weaved past Arellano, 89-73, in the NCAA Season 94 men’s basketball tournament Friday at Filoil Flying V Center.ADVERTISEMENT Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The Blazers improved their record to 8-5 to stay at the fourth spot and in the process doubled their win total from Season 93.Justin Gutang filled up the stat sheets for CSB with 23 points, five rebounds, six assists, and two steals while Rob Nayve added 16 points.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissCSB used its might in the paint to take over and outscored the Chiefs 52-32 underneath the basket and much of that was thanks to big man Clement Leutcheu who had 14 points and 11 boards,Adrian Alban had 22 points for the 4-8 Chiefs who played its first game after former head coach Jerry Codiñera’s resignation. Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plumcenter_img NCAA: Letran returns to winning form, pounds Mapua Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew View commentslast_img read more

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PRESIDENT SIRLEAF APPOINTS NEW FINANCE MINISTER AND NEW CENTRAL BANK GOVERNOR – …

first_imgLiberia has a new Finance Minister, in the person of Boima Kamara, and a new Governor of the Central Bank of Liberia, Milton Weeks.The President chose both of these two topmost officials from the same institution, the Central Bank of Liberia (CBL). Mr. Kamara was Deputy Governor of the CBL and Mr. Weeks was a CBL Governor.Observers see three significant indications in these two appointments: first, that the President has chosen exceptionally well in filling them, which means that she is very serious about finishing well. She has two years to the end of her second term as President of Liberia. Her 12-year tenure ends in January 2018. Second, she recognizes the importance of the two institutions having an excellent relationship, in order to maintain the economic stability Liberia has enjoyed in spite of Ebola. Since Amara Konneh’s appointment as Finance Minister in early 2012, there has been a decisive disconnect between him and former Central Bank Governor J. Mills Jones—the two just never got along.Thirdly, choosing the new Finance Minister and the CBL Governor from the same institution, CBL, is a positive reflection on former CBL Governor J. Mills Jones. This may not have happened had he not run a highly productive and successful CBL during his 10-year tenure. The President has also appointed two new members of the CBL Board: Kollie Tamba, a CBL retiree and husband of the Commissioner General of the Liberia Revenue Authority, Elfrieda Tamba.; and Mrs. Elsie Dossen Badio. New Finance Minister Boima KamaraIn choosing Boima Kamara to head the Finance Ministry, President Sirleaf has brought to her administration another young Liberian brain trust. Born on May 9, 1974 in Monrovia to Mr. John Kamara David and Ms. Yatta Moore, Boima hails from Gballasuah, a Gola village in the Suehn District of Bomi County. He is a product of St. Patrick’s High School, Monrovia, where he graduated first of his class, the valedictorian. He then entered the University of Liberia where he did the same thing, graduating summa cum laude (highest honors) in 2001.He was then recruited to join the staff of the Central Bank of Liberia, where he served first as an Analyst in the Research Department, later as Assistant Director, then as Director of Research and Policy. The CBL sent Mr. Kollie to the University of Ghana at Legon, where he took the Master of Philosophy degree in Economics (MPhil) in 2007.He was later appointed CBL Deputy Governor for Economic Policy. A staunch member of the Philadelphia Central Church in Congotown, Mr. Kollie is married with four children. New CBL Governor Milton WeeksThe new Central Bank Governor is Milton Alvin Weeks, 54, who brings to the table a wealth of experience in the field of banking. Born in Monrovia on March 8, 1974 to University of Liberia President Rocheforte L. Weeks and his wife Euphemia Weeks, Milton is a product of Monrovia‘s College of West Africa (CWA) (1978). Milton matriculated to George Mason University in Virginia, USA and later transferred to Syracuse University in New York State, where he took a degree in Finance. In naming Milton Weeks, who had served for about two years as a Governor on the CBL Board, President Sirleaf has appointed a brilliant and seasoned international banker to head the Central Bank. There are not many who know that at 25 Milton Weeks served as Treasurer of City Bank of Monrovia, Liberia, then Liberia’s oldest and leading bank.Between 1984 and 87 he was Assistant Manager of Citibank Liberia. From 1987 to 1990 he was Assistant Manager of Citibank of Zambia; and from 1992-94 General Manager of Meridian Bank Liberia, following which he joined the FCIB as Vice President and CEO. He later served as Senior ExecutiveManager of Meridien Bank, Zambia. From 1996 to 97, he was Project Consultant of CIBank (in Information) in Malawi and from 1997-1998 as Director, also in Malawi. He rose to the rank of Managing Director at the same Malawian bank (LCIP). Mr. Weeks was later appointed Managing Director of Stanbic Bank in Nigeria. He was responsible for the overall management and operations of the bank, including corporate and investment banking, SME Banking, private banking, treasury; equities trading and banking operations. Mr. Weeks managed the bank from a small corporate banking operation into what became the largest single investment in Africa of the Standard Bank Group of South Africa.Following his retirement from Standard Bank, Milton Weeks returned home to open his own management consulting firm, DEVIN Corporation, a Liberian-based strategic consulting and investment advisory services company, which he served as Managing Director. As Head of Devin, Milton Weeks served from 2008 to 2014 as Principal Consultant and Advisor to the Liberia Bankers Association (LBA). He also oversaw the functions of the LBA, Mr. Weeks is Honorary Member of the Chartered Institute of Bankers of Nigeria, Fellow of the Institute of Credit and Risk Management of Nigeria and Fellow of the Institute of Credit Administration of Nigeria.Fraternally, Milton Weeks is former President of the Rotary Club of Monrovia and Assistant District Governor, Rotary International, District 9101.Mr. Weeks hails from the eminent Weeks family of Crozierville, Montserrado County, and is a member of the Township’s Reeves Memorial United Methodist Church. Acting Finance Minister James KollieAnnouncing these new appointments in government, the Executive Mansion also indicated that Mr. James Kollie, who recently served as Acting Minister of Finance, is slated for another position. The Daily Observer has reliably learnt that James Kollie is slated to become the new Maritime Commissioner, succeeding Binyan Kesselly, who recently resigned after eight years of service. Other AppointmentsOther appointments by the President over the weekend are Attorney Oretha Snyder Davis and Independent National Commission on Human Rights Attorney Oretha Snyder Davis and Attorney James Torh as Commissioners of the Independent National Human Rights Commission. Mr. Torh is reappointed. The President also made two new appointments at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. They are the Rev. Jervis Witherspoon, Chief of Protocol, replacing Mr. Charles Allen, who goes into Diplomatic Service, and Mr. Emmanuel Munyeneh , Assistant Minister for International Cooperation. At the General Auditing Commission, President Sirleaf has appointed Adam Sheriff as Deputy Auditor General for Quality Assurance.Madam Sara K. Kullie has also been appointed Mayor of Voinjama, capital of Lofa County. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Fire guts ECD home

first_imgA fire of unknon origin on Friday evening engulfed a two storey building at Non Pariel, East Coast of Demerara.Guyana Times was told that no one was at home at when the fire started at about 22:00h. More details in Sunday’s editon.last_img

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6 ranks fired for misconduct, 5 under investigation

first_img…50 complaints per month against Police OfficersSome six ranks were dismissed—three for criminal misconduct; while five others are under investigation for October as the Guyana Police Force (GPF) strengthens its zero tolerance policy against unprofessionalism and misconduct.Acting Commissioner of Police David Ramnarine, during a press conference on Monday, expressed worry over the situation but found solace in the fact that the number of reports of misconduct are decreasing.The officers who were dismissed comprised of one subordinate and five constables, with three of them fired for criminal misconduct.One of the ranks under investigation is a female attached to the Brickdam Police Station who is reportedly involved in a missing .32 firearm.“It has to do with the subordinate officer not being able to account for a .32 firearm received by her while on duty, which was lodged by a civilian,” Ramnarine disclosed.Stolen gunsHe reminded that over the last three months, nine guns were reported stolen from licenced firearm holders, seven of which were .32 pistols.Ramnarine only suspected that these missing firearms are making their way into the hands of criminals.During a previous news conference, the Acting Police Commissioner chastised the irresponsible ownership of firearms; more particularly the carelessness involved where some of the firearms reportedly were stolen.“A businesswoman on the East Coast, who obtained a firearm licence for protection, is away from the business, leaves the firearm in a wardrobe at home, there is a robbery and the firearm is taken. How much more ridiculous can we get?” he had outlined.Ramnarine also shared the instance of when a firearm holder, who departed Georgetown to go to Berbice, upon his return to the city, felt drowsy and decided to take a nap along the Plaisance Public Road only to awaken the next morning to discover that his cellular phone and firearm were missing.During that conference, Ramnarine stated that there is uproar for personal firearm licences and yet, recent instances show the high level of irresponsibility being exhibited.“This is the behaviour we have… The other one is, the owner is overseas, the firearm is at home, the wife is not at home – this is on the West Demerara – there is a break and enter and larceny, the firearm is taken in the process. He didn’t lodge it at the Police Station as the instruction says on the licence – when not in use; he left it home – gone!” he noted.50 complaints monthlyMeanwhile, Ramnarine disclosed that there is a 21 per cent reduction in complaints against members of the GPF for the period August 1 to October 25, 2016 when compared to the same period in 2015.The Top Cop (Ag) said there is an average of 50 complaints against Police officers on a monthly basis. For the corresponding period, there were 193 complaints in 2015 and 154 in 2016. For the entire 2015, there were 615 complaints of which 603 were addressed, whereas in 2016, there have been 515 thus far.Ramnarine said judging from the figures, there should be a continued decrease in reports against Police officers in relation to fleecing and street harassment.He alluded the reduction to the efforts by the GPF to clamp down on misconduct and unprofessionalism.The Acting Commissioner had issued several stern warnings to the traffic officers about their unprofessional behaviour when dealing with the travelling public.There have been mounting complaints of Police abusing their authority during road blocks by fleecing and harassing road users.last_img read more

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Woman stunned as old painting sells for $600,000

first_imgPaintings by Mola hang in several museums. The highest price paid for his work appears to be $2.8 million, although several have sold for $100,000 or less, Martin said. The painting shows a gray-haired, bearded man working on papers with an armillary sphere – an instrument used in ancient astronomy – in the background. The seller inherited the painting, which had been given to her grandmother as a gift and hung for years in her home in Pisa, Italy. The seller stored the painting for several months in her Southern California garage and eventually hung it over her piano. When the family’s oldest daughter was accepted to UC Berkeley the seller decided to see what it would bring. She found out in dramatic fashion when the auction, which was also carried online at eBay, began. “I heard a shout and went to see what happened,” the seller said. “I went in the other room, and my husband had fallen out of his chair. We watched the price go higher and higher. We couldn’t even say anything because it didn’t seem real.” In Oakland, patent attorney Ted Bielen, who was in the audience, said jaws dropped and there was a collective “whoa!” as bids came in. “People were saying, `What’s going on here?”‘ he said. Competition between American and some European bidders drove the price to $300,000 and then the New York bidder took the price higher. That bidder fought off a French bidder until the price hit $560,000. Final selling price, with the buyer’s premium, was $620,900. Martin said the check hasn’t come in yet, but the buyer is an established dealer, and he does not anticipate a problem. The family plans to use the money for tuition and perhaps pay off the mortgage. Near where the painting once hung, the seller put a photograph of her grandmother on the piano. She kisses the photo and says, “Thanks, Grandma” several times a day. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! OAKLAND – A woman who auctioned an old painting hoping to get a few thousand dollars toward her daughter’s college tuition was stunned when the picture fetched $600,000. “This was a surprise to all of us,” the seller, who asked to remain anonymous, told the San Francisco Chronicle in a story published Thursday. “It still hasn’t registered yet. We’re all in shock.” The picture sold Sunday by Clars Auction Gallery in Oakland to an unnamed New York dealer has no title or signature and staff of the gallery couldn’t determine its origins. Redge Martin, president of Clars, said Thursday he doesn’t know why the painting brought in so much money, but the buzz in the art world is that someone thinks it’s the lost work of a 17th-century Italian master, Pier Francesco Mola. last_img
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CSI: Evidence is clear about real life and the TV shows

first_imgEnomoto’s questions are no longer unusual in Los Angeles County courtrooms. On the show “CSI,” characters like Gil Grissom analyze DNA and fingerprint evidence, conduct autopsies, attend trials, and interview crime witnesses and suspects – all in one day. Nothing could be further from the truth in a real crime lab, said Forensic Identification Specialist Donna Brandelli, a real-life crime scene investigator. Brandelli works at the downtown Los Angeles crime lab, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Scientific Services Bureau. To her dismay, Brandelli is regularly faced with unrealistic expectations from juror who have wrong notions about those who process crime scenes. When Deputy District Attorney Mike Enomoto chooses a jury for any one of many gang murder trials he prosecutes each year at Norwalk Superior Court, he always first asks what TV shows prospective jurors watch. It seems an odd question among the usual voir dire, or jury selection, inquiries. During voir dire, a pool of potential jurors is asked whether they might have prejudicial feelings toward any elements of the case. But it’s just as crucial to his cases that his jurors be free of TV-generated misconceptions about the justice system, he said. “I ask them: `Who here watches `CSI: Crime Scene Investigation’ or `Law and Order,”‘ said Enomoto. “Normally, I get a large number of hands. I tell them that these shows are fiction and not an accurate reflection of how we do things in the criminal justice system.” “Jurors anecdotally are expecting evidence they have seen on shows like `CSI,”‘ Brandelli said. “In conversations with DAs and detectives, this issue is coming up over and over. Juries have acquitted people because they didn’t get X, Y, Z evidence they expected.” There has been no scientific study of the effects of crime shows on the justice system, said Brandelli. She wants to poll jurors after criminal trials to find out what sort of evidence they expected and whether TV crime shows influenced their expectations. Norwalk Superior Court Judge Dewey Falcone said shows like “CSI” raise the bar for prosecutors, who are faced with more pressure to bring hard evidence to juries. “Most juries don’t understand that you can convict on circumstantial evidence alone,” said Falcone. “They want to see cold, hard evidence. To a certain extent, things are changing because of these TV programs. I think jurors now have a higher expectation of evidence that should be presented by the prosecution.” Falcone talks to each jury panel who sits in his courtroom about the difference between TV and real-world justice. “The county doesn’t have the resources to do a lot of things they do on `CSI,”‘ he said. “We wait months and months for DNA results.” Brandelli said watching the shows makes her cringe. “I hate to give people unrealistic expectations that I’m going to always get fingerprints,” said Brandelli. “They think the crime will be solved in an hour, when it may take months.” For Brandelli, money and resources are not only limited, they are tight. Fancy, high-tech equipment, designer clothing, luxury cars and unlimited money grace the TV screen on shows like “CSI.” Brandelli’s office is a tiny cubicle in a building built decades ago in downtown Los Angeles. About 25 people work in her office. But the building also houses sections for processing biological, physical, firearm, photographic and chemical evidence. When Brandelli is called to a crime scene, she may collect tire or shoe imprints, take photographs, make sketches, lift fingerprints and take measurements. But when it comes to collecting DNA, hair or fiber evidence, she will call in another specialist. “Detectives do investigations, analysts collect evidence, and coroners analyze evidence from the body,” said Brandelli. “I don’t know any agency that would collect evidence, analyze it and arrest someone” like characters do on crime shows. Brandelli does concede that these shows have greatly increased public interest in the fields of forensic science. “Ten years ago when I got my master’s degree, you couldn’t even find a forensic science program,” she said. Now, universities are scrambling to build programs to meet the increasing demand, she said. Brandelli recently began writing a dissertation about the effects of “CSI” and other crime shows on juries for her doctorate degree. She hopes to gain court approval this year to do a scientific study of jurors and their expectations of evidence in criminal cases. For now, Brandelli has to grin and bear the regular comparisons between TV images and her real-world career. “I had a doctor ask me if my job is like `CSI,”‘ said Brandelli. “I said: `No, is your job like `E.R.’?”‘ sandy.mazza@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3026 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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Buss station

first_imgIt was here that he shined shoes at the old Kemmerer Hotel, set pins at the bowling alley and worked on the Union Pacific railroad. The train still comes through town, but the rest of the landmarks from his youth have not stood the test of time. “It was just a place that he knew was too small of a town for him,” daughter Jeanie Buss says. “There was not a lot of excitement that went on in the town, and my dad is a person that likes entertainment. “There were only so many pool halls and places to relax.” There is no sentimentality on Buss’ part for the town he left as a teenager and last saw some 20years ago. When he speaks of Kemmerer these days, the 74-year-old Buss makes no apologies in saying, “The town pretty much has died a slow death.” Yet Kemmerer is still very much living and breathing, a town waiting to see where the current energy boom will take it. For as remote as it is, for as harsh as its winters can be, the biggest problem these days is a housing shortage. It is a place where you wish the buildings could talk, to tell stories from Buss’ days when the triangle (not a square) at the center of town somehow served as home to nine different bars, all of which were packed with orchestras playing on a given Saturday night. As legend has it, even the biggest drinkers couldn’t make it through those three blocks while paying a visit to each bar. There was backroom gambling as well in those days, and maybe even a cathouse or two, as the locals say with a certain pride. It also is the place where the question can be asked: Without Kemmerer would the Lakers as we know them exist? Consider that Buss might never have met a science teacher named Walter Garrett, who helped him earn a scholarship to the University of Wyoming. He might never have gotten a degree in chemistry (with a minor in card playing) and moved to Los Angeles. Buss went on to earn a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from USC. He was working in the aerospace industry when he invested $1,000 into a 14-unit building in 1958. What started as a side business eventually led to Buss owning thousands of apartment units. “Jerry will admit that it was a lot of guts and just the right timing,” says Jim Dover, one of his Kemmerer High classmates who still lives in town. “Prices were going up. It just went from there.” It also gave Buss the fortune to make one of the biggest deals in sports history. He bought the Lakers and Kings, as well as the Forum and a 13,000-acre ranch, from Jack Kent Cooke for $67.5million in 1979. The Lakers won their first championship under Buss the following season and have added seven more titles during his 28years as owner. It is that track record that gives fans hope for the future as the team continues to rebuild after the Shaquille O’Neal trade. (As Buss transfers ownership of the Lakers to his children, the franchise most recently was valued at $568million by Forbes magazine, second only to the New York Knicks.) It takes a harrowing drive up US Highway 189, where the only goal is to stay on the road and out of a snow bank, to realize just how humble Buss’ origins were. It would take the population of Kemmerer seven times over just to fill all the seats in Staples Center for a Lakers game. The locals who still remember Buss’ years in town can only marvel at the starting point for a life so extraordinary. “It blows my mind that a Kemmerer boy like that would make it that big,” says 83-year-old Joe Sebastian, who owned one of the ninebars on the triangle and remembers Buss working at the hotel. And there might be a connection to the town that exists deeper in the Buss family than any of them know. Jeanie Buss got a sense when she made her first trip with Phil Jackson to his summer home in Montana eight years ago. “It was eerie to me because it felt so much like my home,” she says. “I realized that I had it in my roots.” For a town of only 2,651residents, about 21/2hours outside of Salt Lake City in the least populous state in the country, Kemmerer has three claims to fame. It is the fossil fish capital of the world, with the Fossil Butte National Monument just west of town. It is home to one of the largest open-pit coal mines in the state and one of the largest natural gas hubs in the country. And it is the town where a man named James Cash Penney arrived in 1902 to open a Golden Rule Store. The JC Penney mother store is still in business on the Kemmerer triangle, not far from where Buss lived above his stepfather’s plumbing shop. What Kemmerer is not known for is being home to one of the most celebrated owners in sports, a man who was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in October and was nominated to the Basketball Hall of Fame this year. “I don’t think most people even know,” says Lester Fatheree, who is a Realtor in town, a pastor and a sports writer for the weekly Kemmerer Gazette. “Of course, the old-timers all know and they have some pride in that. “I think Kemmerer is – and very typical for this part of the world and the jobs we have – Kemmerer is a fairly transient community. “Twenty-five, 30 percent’s permanent. The rest of them move in and out.” Born in Salt Lake City, Buss was no different. He moved to Kemmerer when he was 13 and lived with his mother (Jessie), stepfather (C.O. Brown), half-sister (Susan), half-brother (Mickey) and stepbrother (Jim). He was one in a graduating class of 42. “You knew everybody,” Buss says. “You could walk down the street and say hello to everybody. I think it was very good. Growing up in a small town, I think, has a lot of advantages for a young man.” It is next to impossible to imagine what Kemmerer was like in the Wild West days. The nine bars on the triangle were filled with miners, ranchers and more than a few folks from Utah in search of a drink or with an itch to gamble. “It was plenty wild but it was totally different,” Dover says. “When we were in high school, 15, 16, you could drink if you could put the money on the bar.” As Dover remembers, that triangle also was a place where Kemmerer could pull together. When one of its boys had the chance to compete at a national track meet, the town managed to raise $700 in a half-hour going from bar to bar. There was also backroom gambling in those days, before a new sheriff put an end to it. Dover can remember Buss shooting pool and playing cards long before he ever became one of the modern-day poker stars on television. The two ran around town and ate banana cr me pies for breakfast at the Kemmerer Hotel by rigging the slot machine while Dover’s future mother-in-law looked the other way. At the same time, Buss also had to work to keep money in his pocket. So he shined shoes and carried bags at the hotel. He set pins at the bowling alley, which he still remembers had only two lanes. And he opted to work as a section hand on the railroad instead of heading out to the coal mines. “I just remember Jerry was very industrious,” says Raymond Barp, who graduated from Kemmerer High in 1964, knew Buss’ half-brother and lives in Glendale. “If there was a job he could do and make a buck, he was there.” The way out of Kemmerer started when Buss met Garrett, the man he calls his “inspiration.” Garrett was the town’s science teacher and wound up taking Buss in during his senior year, after Buss had a falling out with his stepfather. For a while, Buss had been living in a glorified closet at the hotel. “He was the most important thing in my life,” Buss says. “He’s the one that turned everything around for me. I was not academically inclined – school was easy for me, I didn’t have bad grades – but he encouraged me and I was able to get a scholarship.” Garrett arranged for Buss to take a national science test sponsored by Bausch and Lomb. He headed to the university in Laramie with a scholarship and roomed with Kenneth Doi, one of his closest friends from Kemmerer. Doi remembers that Buss petitioned to take algebra, trigonometry and analytical geometry concurrently rather than in a sequence. He played poker almost every night and graduated from college in only 21/2 years with one amazing distinction. “He never turned in a paper with an error on it, whether it was a daily quiz or a final exam,” says Doi, who now lives in Orange. “That’s really an accomplishment. Everything was 100 percent.” Buss received an honorary doctorate of laws from the University of Wyoming in May 2005, at which time he spoke about the road out of Kemmerer that education offered. “I realized that most of the kids who grew up in the mining camps stayed in those towns and worked in the mines,” Buss said. “I didn’t see myself doing that. … Freedom became the most important thing in my life and education became my way out.” Years later Buss offered to buy Garrett a Cadillac to show his appreciation, although Dover remembers the former teacher wasn’t able to accept it with his health declining. It takes a special breed to live in Kemmerer. The town’s mayor, Dave Fagnant, can remember a stretch of threeweeks in winter 1972 when the temperature never rose above zero. Another local claims to have seen snow in every month on the calendar. The town was founded in 1897, named after a Pennsylvania coal magnate, and has had boom and bust years ever since. The darkest day in its history came in 1923, when 99 men were killed in an explosion at the Frontier Mine. There are coal seams more than 100 feet thick in the mountains and enough natural gas to maintain production for the next 190 years. As energy prices increase, Kemmerer is at the start of a boom cycle again, much as it was in the late 1970s. Yet the decline of the Kemmerer triangle remains a sore spot for many residents. The Kemmerer Hotel had to be torn down in 2004. The plumbing shop where Buss once lived had met the same fate years before. Only two of the nine bars still are in business. “There used to be a lot of little ma-and-pa type stores and we don’t have that,” Fagnant says. “We’ve really lost a lot of small businesses in the county, and I think that has to do with modern transportation. “Everybody just hops in their new Ford or GM and drives 50 miles to Evanston (Wyo.) or 90 miles to Rock Springs (Wyo.) and does most of their shopping out of town.” There are more people in town than when Buss grew up, yet fewer businesses. The common refrain is that television and cars have contributed to the decline, with people able to find 100channels of entertainment at home or head out of town on a whim. At the same time, Kemmerer retains much of the same feel from Buss’ days. As witnessed on a cold night, nobody thinks twice about leaving the engine running while ducking into the supermarket. There’s talk on Fagnant’s part of hoping to grow the population to about 6,000 in the coming years. At the same time, the mayor can joke that the town’s two stoplights are “probably on intersections that don’t deserve them anymore.” Although he hasn’t returned in 20 years, Buss has been good to people from Kemmerer who have come to Los Angeles. He hired Dover’s son, Steve, to work for his various teams and took his old friend to Lakers games and boxing matches. One of Dover’s fondest memories is a dinner with Buss and Vin Scully. There also are Lakers fans in Kemmerer, the biggest being Tracy Carotta, who owns Scroungy Moose Pizza and watches every game on TV while he makes pies. “I like them for the superstars they’ve maintained down through the years,” Carotta says. “I think they’ve just done tremendous getting players that are exciting to watch.” What Buss’ legacy will be in the town has yet to be decided. There are those who wish the town had appealed to Buss to save the old hotel before it was demolished. Dover would be happy with any acknowledgment that Buss lived in Kemmerer. “It’d be nice,” Dover says, “but Jerry hasn’t really wanted it either. He didn’t really come back.” The biggest project in Kemmerer today is a $5million events center, tentatively set to open in late 2008 or early 2009. It will be a place where the locals can host a wedding reception and the energy companies can hold safety training. The funding has been secured, and Fagnant, who calls the new center “a huge thing for the life of this town,” already has one idea in mind: He would like to invite Buss along with a descendant of Penney back to Kemmerer for the dedication. But there are still years to go before Buss has to make the decision about heading back down that road and returning to his old town. ross.siler@dailynews.com (818) 713-3610 KEMMERER, Wyo. Before you exit Interstate 80 and start down the 37 miles of two-lane highway it takes to reach this coal-mining town in the southwest corner of Wyoming, remember that Jerry Buss never considered it anything other than a one-way road. Nobody would leave the big city in search of Kemmerer, let alone in the middle of a snowstorm, when the trucks from the mines come barreling down the unplowed highway in the other direction. The same direction that Buss’ dreams all led. This is the town where Buss grew up and graduated from high school in 1950, where the chain of events started that led to him owning the Lakers. In the story of his life, though, Kemmerer is the place that Buss put in his rearview mirror. last_img read more

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Imperial CEO says no to Aspen oilsands project until Alberta oil quotas gone

first_imgImperial also confirmed a plan to boost production from its Kearl oilsands mine to 280,000 bpd from the current 200,000 bpd through the addition of supplemental ore crushers and self-driving haul trucks, along with other enhancements.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 12, 2019.Companies mentioned in this article: (TSX:IMO)The Canadian PressAdvertisement CALGARY — The outgoing CEO of Imperial Oil Ltd. says the $2.6-billion Aspen oilsands project in northern Alberta it announced a year ago — only to cancel it a few months later — will remain on the sidelines until the province completely ends its oil curtailment program.Rich Kruger, who is retiring at year-end, says the company which is about 70 per cent owned by American giant Exxon Mobil Corp. can’t go forward with a major expansion until the government halts its program to restrict oil production to support local prices.Sanctioning of the Aspen project, which would have used steam and solvents to produce 75,000 barrels of bitumen per day from wells, surprised observers when it was announced at last year’s investor day but there was no such surprise at this year’s event in Toronto on Tuesday.- Advertisement -The Calgary-based company did, however, announce a $450-million project to boost output from its four-decades-old Cold Lake thermal project in northeastern Alberta by drilling into the previously undeveloped Grand Rapids underground oilsands formation.Imperial says the project will save about $1 billion in capital spending by replacing its previously proposed Cold Lake expansion project, which would have added 55,000 bpd of capacity. The new plan involves diverting steam from its nearby underperforming Nabiye project, started up in 2015, to bring on about 15,000 bpd in the first phase by 2021, with new steam generation added in future phases to take production to 40,000 to 50,000 bpd.Advertisementlast_img read more

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West Ham transfer update! Hammers target FOUR more signings

first_imgWest Ham boss Sam Allardyce says he still hopes to sign four more players before the transfer window closes at the end of August.Allardyce has already been busy this summer bringing in Mauro Zarate, Cheikhou Kouyate, Aaron Cresswell and Diego Poyet but still wants more reinforcements.The West Ham manager would still like to make a big money signing and provide more competition for Andy Carroll.He has been linked with moves for Colombia striker Enner Valencia and Ukraine forward Yevhen Konoplyanka and hopes to land one of his targets in the next few weeks.The West Ham boss would also like to sign another left back, central defender and a midfielder to give his side every chance of securing a top half finish next season.Allardyce, speaking on West Ham TV, said: “I think there are three or four positions – it depends on the budget.“You would say there is still room for a young central defender, particularly a left-footed one because we do run with three and not four.“Ideally, you would have four. You would also say we need another left-back to go along with Aaron and I think a front-line player and the possibility of a midfield player as well.” 1 West Ham manager Sam Allardyce last_img read more

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