Thrown into a new job’

first_imgYears before he was appointed Vice President for Student Affairs, Fr. Tom Doyle operated under a different title at Notre Dame — student body president. “I remember I was just a kid from a small town in Washington state. After I was elected, I was worried I was not presidential enough. I talk slow and I have sort of folksy ways about me,” Doyle said. “I remember for the first couple of months trying to be what I thought was presidential but it was so hard for me because I was not good at it. I was not good at not being myself.” Doyle served as student body president during his senior year at Notre Dame from 1988 to 1989, and his experience as an undergraduate leader stuck with him as he returned to campus to work for the University. “Whenever you are thrown into a new job or new profession, there is not a platonic form of student body president or leader or priest. That role needs to become part of who you are. Coming back here to Notre Dame, I assumed a new role and have to constantly remind myself that I have to be the best version of me I can be,” Doyle said. Dealing with the administration as a student prepared Doyle to be an administrator himself. “I found that the administrators really cared a lot about students,” Doyle said. “As I think about myself now, I hope I am as good at understanding and navigating for students as an administrator as my administrators were for me.” Doyle said he also learned how to handle criticism during his time as student body president. “It is not such a terrible thing to have people critique or disagree or take issue with what you are doing or the way you are doing it,” he said. “You have to be convicted that you are following the values that you think are important to you and the promises you have made.” Doyle began his career in student government as the president of Grace Hall during his junior year. Michael Paese, a friend of Doyle’s, suggested the two run for student body president and vice president despite their limited student government experience. “We were outsiders. We were not student government insiders,” Doyle said. “We did not know how everything ran. But we kept talking about it.” Despite his misgivings, Doyle and Paese turned their conversations into a campaign. During the weeks leading up to their election, the team campaigned by knocking on the door to every room in every residence hall. Doyle said he and Paese saw the 1988 presidential election between Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush as an important part of their own term. The team led a voter registration and education drive, which registered over 2,000 students to vote, and held debates on election issues. “It was our insight that Notre Dame is the premier Catholic university in the country,” he said. “Notre Dame and Notre Dame students should be at the forefront of issues that affect our country.” Doyle said many of the same issues mattered students during his term are still important for the current student body. Current student body president Catherine Soler and vice president Andrew Bell focused on community relations after a spike in student arrests and tensions with South Bend police at the beginning of the year, and problems between students and police plagued Doyle’s administration as well. “One of the things that we had to deal with in the fall was police and student issues as well. The issue was that they were using dogs to break up the parties,” Doyle said. “I only wish that we were as effective as this year’s student government at being a good broker and convoy between the South Bend police and the student body. These issues will come up again and again.” Doyle said the current officers deserved praise for smoothing tensions between campus and its neighbors in South Bend. “Especially with a lot of the off-campus issues, the reason that we have found a bit of a détente with law enforcement has to do with Catherine and Andrew and how they have been leaders among their peers,” Doyle said. Doyle dealt with practical problems on campus as well as larger issues in the community. His administration set up the first campus 24-hour space outside the dorms, rented more portable toilets for football tailgaters and surveyed students on the University’s alcohol policy. An editorial printed in the April 4, 1989, issue of The Observer said Doyle and Paese were “a tough act to follow.” Doyle said his position was taxing, but his year with Paese taught him the value of working with a trustworthy partner. “If you are going to do anything that is going to be stretching or challenging, make sure you do it with somebody whose deepest values align with yours,” Doyle said. Doyle and Paese built their success on a friendship that remains after almost 25 years. “[Paese] was a smart, articulate, fast-talking Italian from the East Coast, and I was a much slower, simple, nice guy from a little town in Washington state,” Doyle said. “In a lot of ways we could not have been more different from each other, but together we made a pretty good team.” Despite the lessons Doyle learned during his term, he joked that the immediate rewards of his election were not what he expected. “As student body president, I thought my social life would improve,” he said. “Being elected was not worth it for the social life.”last_img read more

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Students lead RecSports fitness classes for their peers

first_imgBetween schoolwork, socializing and extracurricular activities, many Notre Dame students turn to fitness classes to incorporate personal fitness into their busy schedules. But some students take that commitment to fitness even further by working as RecSports student fitness instructors. Senior Caitlin Kinser channels her interest in dance by teaching Zumba, a dance-based fitness program that involves routines set to international music. After attending her first Zumba classes with a friend two summers ago, Kinser continued pursuing her interest in the program through a RecSports class the following fall and became a licensed instructor that October. For Kinser, the decision to become a student instructor instead of a class participant was an easy one. “I said to myself, ‘Okay, I could either pay to take the class or I could get paid to work out and do something that I love,’” Kinser said. “It’s a win-win situation.” Kinser said student fitness instructors are responsible for creating unique routines and workouts for each class meeting and are free to choose accompanying music for the classes. As a member of the Zumba Instructor Network (ZIN), Kinser said she receives CDs and DVDs with suggested songs and choreography. Although the provided material would simplify Kinser’s role as a Zumba instructor, she said she prefers to choreograph most of her own material set to her favorite music, even if it requires more time and effort to do so. “I really enjoy [choreographing classes], but at the same time, it’s the hardest and most time-consuming part,” Kinser said. “My classes are one hour, but it may take me all day to make up new routines.” Senior Allie Hamman decided to become an indoor cycling instructor after her own instructor of two years encouraged her to pursue the opportunity through RecSports. To qualify for the position, Hamman took a grueling indoor cycling instruction course that involved six hours of biking and a written exam. She is now completing her second year as a RecSports instructor. Although indoor cycling is essentially an individual sport, Hamman said her role as an instructor has allowed her to encourage class participation in common fitness goals. “Normally, working out is more of a personal thing and instructing’s more about projecting what you want people to do,” Hamman said. Both Kinser and Hamman said they faced some initial difficulties leading their first few classes. “Having the microphone on definitely took some getting used to. I think that was the hardest thing,” Kinser said. “Because I did a lot of dance in high school, I’m used to learning and doing choreography, but when you’re dancing you don’t have to tell people what’s coming next, you just do it.” However, Kinser said those challenges gradually disappeared as she became accustomed to teaching her classes. “After teaching for about a month, I got comfortable with it and started being able to have fun when I was teaching, so now I’ve kind of got my own style,” Kinser said.   Though developing class workouts can be challenging, Hamman said she tries to motivate her students by providing them with fresh, interesting workouts each week. “You never want someone to come to a class and think, ‘I could have done this on my own. Why am I here?’” she said. “You want to be pushing them further than they would normally push themselves, which I think is the goal of having a fitness instructor.” Whatever the difficulties of their respective positions, Kinser and Hamman agreed the rewards of seeing students improve outweigh the challenges of their jobs. “There were people that I could see a physical difference in, and that’s really rewarding, because ultimately you want to see your students succeed and you want to see them getting fitness results,” Kinser said. It’s always rewarding to see people doing something I enjoy and knowing that they are feeling the enjoyment that I am trying to project,” Hamman said. Students can visit recsports.nd.edu for more information on student-instructed fitness courses and other RecSports fitness programs.last_img read more

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Jennifer Blood & John Sanders Will Join Broadway’s Matilda

first_img Next stop, Broadway! Jennifer Blood and John Sanders will join the Broadway production of Matilda beginning September 6 and September 13, respectively. Blood takes over for Allison Case as Miss Honey; Sanders will play Mr. Wormwood, currently performed by Rick Holmes. The musical is set to shutter on January 1, 2017 at the Shubert Theatre.Blood previously played the role of Miss Honey on Matilda’s national tour. She has also appeared on Broadway in Violet and A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder. Sanders originated the roles of The Party Entertainer and Sergei in Matilda on Broadway and also appeared in Peter and the Starcatcher.Directed by Tony and Olivier Award winner Matthew Warchus, Matilda is the story of an extraordinary girl who dreams of a better life. Armed with a vivid imagination and a sharp mind, Matilda dares to take a stand and change her destiny. Based on the beloved Roald Dahl novel of the same name, the musical features a book by Dennis Kelly and music and lyrics by Tim Minchin.The current cast additionally includes Bryce Ryness as Miss Trunchbull, Amy Spanger as Mrs. Wormwood and Natalie Venetia Belcon as Mrs. Phelps. Ava Briglia, Aviva Winick and Willow McCarthy share the title role. As previously announced, Lesli Margherita is also slated to begin performances as Mrs. Wormwood on September 6. Related Shows Matilda Jennifer Blood in ‘Matilda'(Photo: Brian Tietz)center_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 1, 2017last_img read more

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Versatile vines

first_imgBy Robert R. WesterfieldUniversity ofGeorgiaVines are among the most versatile plants in the landscape. Theycan screen unsightly views, provide privacy on patios, lendcharacter to solid walls, break up the monotony of long fences,accent or soften architectural details or cover the ground whereeither you don’t want turf grass or it won’t grow.Landscape architects sometime use vines on trees to provide a newdimension to the tree canopy. An oak tree bearing the brightorange flowers of cross vine, for instance, is sure to be aconversation piece.Some vines, like Bougainvillea or Allamanda, are excellent foruse in patio pots or hanging baskets. Moonvine adds a wonderfulfragrance with an evening bloom.Honeysuckle and trumpet creeper are prized for their flowers,while other vines, such as five-leaf Akebia, climbing fig andivy, are grown for their foliage. Wisteria is sometimes trainedas a single-standing specimen or small tree.What to look forWhen selecting vines, consider a number of factors, includingtheir intended use, landscape location (sun or shade, forinstance), soil adaptability, support structure needed and colorof bloom or foliage.Think about the maintenance requirement, too. Will it needconstant pruning to keep it within bounds?Certain fast-growing vines, such as wisteria and commonhoneysuckle, can cover trees and shrubs unless you do a lot ofroutine pruning. Some can injure or kill small trees by wrappingaround them and cutting off nutrient flow. Others, likeautumn-flowering clematis, will disperse their seeds afterflowering and pop up where they’re not wanted.Annual vines are grown from seedeach year. Among them are moonvine (Ipomoea alba),black-eyed Susan vine (Thunbergia alata), sweet pea(Lathyrus odorata), purple hyacinth bean (Dolicheslablab) and morning glory (Ipomoea spp.).Perennial vines persist from yearto year. The foliage may die back in winter and resprout inspring. Among the favorites are trumpet creeper (Campsisspp.), Carolina yellow jessamine (Gelsemiumsempervirens), wisteria (Wisteria spp.) and clematis(Clematis hybrida).Consider the amount of training a vine requires, too. Some clingand climb naturally, while others must be trained to follow thesupporting wire, pole or other structure.Most vines, except those grown as ground covers or in pots,require some type of support to grow. Climbing vines come inthree types: clinging, twining and winding.Clinging vines grasp a roughsurface with rootlets or adhesive disks. Climbing fig (Ficuspumila), English ivy (Hedera helix), confederatejasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides), Virginia creeper(Pathenocissus quinquefolia) and trumpet creeper(Campsis radicans) are examples.These vines can cover solid surfaces such as walls and fences.However, they may loosen mortar between bricks over time and arehard to remove once they become anchored.They can damage wood, too, by clinging too closely, preventinggood air circulation and promoting wood decay. So, clinging vinesare best suited for trellises or arbors away from solid surfaces.Twining vines climb by encirclingupright supports such as poles, wires and lattices. They requiremechanical training to follow a support. Examples are Mandevilla(Mandevilla splendens), wisteria (Wisteriasinensis), Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens)and morning glory.Winding vines climb with tendrils:slim, flexible, leafless stems that wrap around anything theycontact. One of the best-known examples is the muscadine grape.Ornamental examples include maypop (Passiflora spp.),trumpet honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), clematis(Clematis hybrida) and cross vine (Bignoniacapreolata).Twining and winding vines are supported best on wires, lattice,trellises and arbors. Make supports from sturdy, durablematerials.Always use treated lumber for outdoor structures. Redwood, cedarand cypress are particularly durable. A wood preservative/waterseal will prolong the life of the structure. Wrought iron makesan excellent support, too. Aluminum or copper wire won’t rust.(Bob Westerfield is an Extension Service consumerhorticulturist with the University of Georgia College ofAgricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Massachusetts, Rhode Island Bet Big on Offshore Wind

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享CommonWealth:The Baker administration placed a bold bet on the economic and environmental benefits of offshore wind Wednesday, selecting one company to build an 800-megawatt wind farm off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard and working with Rhode Island to procure another 400 megawatts at another location in the same area.State officials said they hope the two procurements will kickstart a regional industry with the potential to generate thousands of jobs across southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island and introduce a huge chunk of renewable, emission-free electricity into the region’s power grid. The 800-megawatt procurement, at full capacity, would represent nearly 6 percent of the state’s electricity load, state officials said.Judith Judson, the commissioner of the Department of Energy Resources, which oversaw a procurement process that was carried out by the state’s utilities, said the state should realize long-term benefits by hosting the largest offshore wind project in the United States.Vineyard Wind, a partnership between Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners and Avangrid Renewables, a subsidiary of a utility holding company, won the 800-megawatt contract from Massachusetts. Deepwater Wind, which built the nation’s first commercial offshore wind farm off of Block Island (30 megawatts), won the 400-megawatt procurement from Rhode Island.Lars Pedersen, the CEO of Vineyard Wind, said his project will use New Bedford as its main staging area for construction, which is expected to start in 2019 and be completed in 2021. The wind farm’s transmission line will connect to Barnstable on Cape Cod and, once the turbines are turning, the operations and maintenance for the project will be handled out of Martha’s Vineyard. Pedersen estimated the 800 megawatt project will yield 2,000 job years of employment, the equivalent of 2,000 people working one year. But he said the total value of the project will be realized over time as the industry expands. “We think that these projects are the beginning of an industry,” he said.More: Baker Makes Bold Bet on Offshore Wind Massachusetts, Rhode Island Bet Big on Offshore Windlast_img read more

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The CUInsight Experience podcast: George Hofheimer – Pressure is a privilege (#33)

first_img 225SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Randall Smith Randall Smith is the co-founder of CUInsight.com, the host of The CUInsight Experience podcast, and a bit of a wanderlust.As one of the co-founders of CUInsight.com he … Web: www.CUInsight.com Details Welcome to episode 33 of The CUInsight Experience podcast. Hosted by Randy Smith, co-founder and publisher of CUInsight.com. On this episode, Randy is chatting with George Hofheimer, the EVP Chief Research and Development Officer at Filene. Learn all about George’s time in the Peace Corps, the challenges credit unions face today, and what’s new at Filene.Filene is a research organization invested in providing needed information to the benefit of credit unions. They hear the good, the bad, and the ugly in credit union board rooms and George shares his insights on the future of credit unions. Also, listen in and learn why talent management and inclusion are extremely important to that future.George talks about his family history in the Peace Corps and how it has impacted his life and career. All three stages of our conversation were packed with fantastic advice and insights for both business and life. You won’t want to miss a second. Subscribe on: Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher How to find George:George Hofheimer, EVP + Chief Research + Development Officerfilene.orggeorgeh@filene.orgLinkedIn | TwitterShow notes from this episode:Company mentioned: Filene Research InstituteProgram mentioned: Filene i3 ProgramProgram mentioned: Filene Cooperative Trust ProgramBlog mentioned: Filene BlogCompany mentioned: Credit Union Executive SocietyShout out: Billie Jean KingShout out: Peace CorpsGeorge’s buddy, Rick Thomas’ seafood distribution company: She Nah NamAlbums mentioned: Darkness on the Edge of Town – Bruce SpringsteenBook mentioned: Sarge: The Life and Times of Sargent Shriver by Scott StosselPrevious guests mentioned in this episode: Doug Leighton, Jim Nussle, Jill Nowacki (Ep. 4 & Ep. 18)You can find all past episodes of The CUInsight Experience here. In This Episode:[00:30] – Welcome back to the show and learn about this episode’s guest, George Hofheimer.[01:58] – George and Randy talk about their introversion and what led to this episode happening.[02:51] – Filene is in an interesting position to understand the challenges credit unions face today and tomorrow, and George shares these insights.[04:41] – What is Filene and what do they do?[06:25] – How should credit unions move forward in the war for talent and how do equity and inclusion apply?[10:51] – Listen to George react to the phrase, “That’s the way we’ve always done it.”[12:12] – Learn what credit unions need to do to stay relevant in the industry.[15:29] – How does technology factor into credit unions today?[17:39] – Get in touch with Filene…[20:20] – What inspired George to start with Filene and why is he still there?[22:14] – Learn how George leads, what his teams say about it, and their greatest strength.[25:00] – What does George say all the time?[25:53] – Not asking for help or advice, the number one mistake young leaders make.[28:40] – How the Peace Corps attributed to George’s most impactful life lesson.[31:11] – What does George do to get over the walls and roadblocks he encounters?[32:05] – Learn how he balances work and life.[35:35] – The first time George got into memorable trouble…[38:08] – George’s daily routines involve taking a walk with his dog.[38:47] – Favorite album: Darkness on the Edge of Town – Bruce Springsteen[39:17] – Recommended book: Sarge: The Life and Times of Sargent Shriver by Scott Stossel[40:33] – What has become more and less important for George as he’s gotten older?[41:15] – Success equals George’s friend Rick Thomas. Learn why![43:33] – Final thoughts? last_img read more

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Vestal man honors local coronavirus victims with Bunn Hill Cemetery memorial

first_imgKen Fortier places dozens of American flags at the Bunn Hill Cemetery in Vestal, one for each Broome County Covid-19 victim. The flags will be up all weekend. “They’re heroes just like the heroes in the hospitals,” said Fortier. center_img VESTAL (WBNG) — Ahead of Memorial Day Weekend, a Vestal man honored those who fought for our country, and those who fought for their lives during the coronavirus pandemic. last_img

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Robert Pires makes bold prediction over Arsenal’s top-four and Europa League chances

first_imgThe Gunners legend has high hopes that Arsenal will finish the season strongly (Picture: Getty)Robert Pires has been impressed with how Unai Emery has improved Arsenal since taking charge and is backing them to both win the Europa League and finish in the top four.The Gunners moved back up into fourth place with a win over Manchester United and are just one point behind third-placed Tottenham, while they overturned a 3-1 deficit to progress to the quarter-final of the Europa League.Arsenal were handed a tough draw against Napoli but Pires is backing his old club to go all the way as well as holding off United and Chelsea in the fight for a top-four place. Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 27 Mar 2019 11:35 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link237Shares Emery took Arsenal to Dubai for warm-weather training this week (Picture: Getty)‘I think Unai Emery is a good manager, he’s won some titles with Sevilla, with Paris Saint-Germain,’ the Frenchman told ESPN.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘For the end of the season, he has two targets: to reach the top four and – why not – to win the Europa League competition.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘That’s why Arsenal are in a very good way and that’s why I’m very confident and very positive always when I talk about Arsenal.‘I think they can reach both targets. Of course it will be very difficult, but the squad is very good, we have good quality. Comment Advertisementcenter_img Advertisement Pires represented Arsenal at the launch of this summer’s International Champions Cup (Getty)‘All the players now they are very confident, especially Mesut Ozil – because he is one of the best players in the Premier League.‘So that’s why Unai Emery, the squad, they are very confident for the two targets: the top four and why not lift the [Europa League] trophy.’Will Arsenal win the Europa League and finish in the top four?Yes0%No0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your resultsMore: Manchester United FCRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseEx-Man Utd coach blasts Ed Woodward for two key transfer errors Robert Pires makes bold prediction over Arsenal’s top-four and Europa League chanceslast_img read more

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Governor’s Award for Safety Excellence Winners Announced

first_img October 31, 2016 Press Release Hershey, PA – Five Pennsylvania employers were presented today with a Governor’s Award for Safety Excellence at the annual Governor’s Occupational Safety and Health Conference in Hershey. The awards recognize companies that have achieved the highest standards in workplace safety.“The five companies recognized today are doing their part to keep Pennsylvania workers safe, and therefore, to help Pennsylvania’s economy grow and strengthen,” said Governor Wolf. “Workplace safety is a crucial element in a strong economy, and the companies we honor today should stand as an example to all Pennsylvania employers.”Any Pennsylvania employer is eligible for the Governor’s Award for Safety Excellence. Information and criteria used to determine finalists include workplace injuries/illnesses vs. industry standards; and innovation and strategic development of safety policy and approaches.The application process for the Governor’s Award for Safety Excellence is highly competitive. The award recognizes successful employer-employee safety programs that produce tangible safety improvements.“Labor & Industry is proud to recognize the five companies honored today for their excellent safety records,” Secretary of Labor & Industry Kathy Manderino said. “The department will continue to support these companies in their commitment to safer workplaces, and to offer assistance to any other company in the commonwealth in their efforts to improve and excel in workplace safety.”The five 2016 Governor’s Award for Safety Excellence winners are:West Penn Power, GreensburgMet-Ed, ReadingLycoming Engines, WilliamsportG.R. Noto Electrical Construction, Clarks SummitGlobal Advanced Metals, Boyertown Governor’s Award for Safety Excellence Winners Announced Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Queensland’s best new home this year may surprise you

first_imgQLD Architecture Awards 2017 – Winner for Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Cape Tribulation House by m3architecture. Picture: Supplied QLD Architecture Awards 2017 – Winner for Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Cape Tribulation House by m3architecture. Picture: SuppliedQUEENSLAND’S best new home this year may also be one of the easiest to replicate of the list of winners at Friday’s state architecture awards. Cape Tribulation House by m3architecture – a home that resembles a makeshift campsite – has beat all comers to take out the prestigious Robin Dods Award for Residential Architecture involving new houses. QLD Architecture Awards 2017 – Commendation for Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Farrell Street House in Ashgrove by James Russell Architect. Picture: Supplied QLD Architecture Awards 2017 – Winner for Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Cape Tribulation House by m3architecture. Picture: SuppliedThe jury found the small off-the-grid home nestled in the World Heritage Daintree protected zone “recedes carefully into the shadows of the rainforest canopy camouflaged with black cladding and mirrored glass”.‘The social heart is a breezeway deck with pavilions offering contemplation and comfort. A disciplined and deep respect for the rainforest drives the holistic approach from siting to occupation.” QLD Architecture Awards 2017 – Winner for Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Cape Tribulation House by m3architecture. Picture: SuppliedTwo Brisbane homes received awards in the new houses category: Drury Street by Marc & Co and Baber Studio and Bardon House by bureau^proberts (with PHAB). A third capital city home, Farrell Street House by James Russell Architect received a commendation at the awards in the same category. QUEENSLAND STATE ARCHITECTURE AWARDS 2017: Residential Architecture – Houses (New) The Robin Dods Award – Cape Tribulation House by m3architectureAward – Drury Street by Marc&Co and Baber StudioAward – Byron Bay House and Studio by Vokes and PetersAward – Bardon House by bureau^proberts (with PHAB)Award – Tent House by Sparks ArchitectsAward – Inverdon House by Chloe NaughtonAward – Mitti Street House by James Russell ArchitectCommendation – Whale House by Paul Uhlmann ArchitectsCommendation – Rocky by Base ArchitectureCommendation – Ringrose Residence by Brian Hooper ArchitectCommendation – Farrell Street House by James Russell Architect (Source: AIA) QLD Architecture Awards 2017 – Award for Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Drury Street in West End by Marc & Co and Baber Studio. Picture: Suppliedcenter_img QLD Architecture Awards 2017 – Winner for Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Cape Tribulation House by m3architecture. Picture: Supplied QLD Architecture Awards 2017 – Winner for Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Cape Tribulation House by m3architecture. Picture: Supplied QLD Architecture Awards 2017 – Award for Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Bardon House in Bardon by bureau^proberts (with PHAB). Picture: Supplied More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home4 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor4 hours agoQLD Architecture Awards 2017 – Winner for Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Cape Tribulation House by m3architecture. Picture: Suppliedlast_img read more

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