LightSail 2 mission declares success as it sets sail on sunlight

first_img 0 MISSION SUCCESS! We just raised our orbit around Earth using sunlight alone, something that’s never been done before.#LightSail2 is now the highest performing solar sail to date and it’s 100% crowdfunded by our members and backers! pic.twitter.com/9bLxTNgbJs— Planetary Society (@exploreplanets) July 31, 2019 LightSail 2 raised its orbital high point by about 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) over the last four days. The demonstration marks the completion of the spacecraft’s primary goal. The Planetary Society wants to show that solar sailing is a viable means of propulsion for CubeSats. CubeSats are small, low-cost satellites that can be used to explore space and conduct science in orbit. NASA notably sent two CubeSats along on its InSight mission to Mars in 2018, the first time this small type of spacecraft had been on a deep-space mission. Solar sailing could potentially be used to propel vehicles all the way to other solar systems. Cosmic dead ringers: 27 super strange-looking space objects Share your voice Solar sailor Tags See Bill Nye’s super shiny LightSail 2 solar sail stretch out in space SpaceX Falcon Heavy’s first night flight to carry Bill Nye’s solar sailcenter_img 27 Photos Post a comment This image shows the LightSail 2 with its sail deployed. The Planetary Society It’s always sunny if you’re a solar sailor.The experimental LightSail 2 spacecraft has lifted its orbit using just the power of sunlight. The Planetary Society and its CEO, science celebrity Bill Nye, hosted a press conference on Wednesday to make the milestone announcement.LightSail 2 acts a bit like a sailboat, except it’s pushed by photon particles from the sun hitting the reflective surface of its large, shiny Mylar sail. LightSail 2 launched into space in June with an assist from SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket and unfurled its sail last week.”We just raised our orbit around Earth using sunlight alone, something that’s never been done before,” The Planetary Society live-tweeted during the press conference as it declared “Mission success!” Part of the funding for LightSail 2 came from a Kickstarter campaign led by Nye and fellow science star Neil DeGrasse Tyson, which brought in over $1.2 million.The Planetary Society will continue to raise the spacecraft’s orbit over the next month. LightSail 2 is destined to eventually re-enter Earth’s atmosphere in about a year, but it will have made its point: Solar sailing works and it could become a key new technology in spacecraft propulsion. Sci-Tech Spacelast_img read more

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Outgoing Senator Mark Begich Bids Farewell On Senate Floor

first_imgMark Begich said goodbye on the floor of the U.S. Senate on Thursday. His six years in office end with this Congress.Download AudioBegich, who lost his seat largely due to his embrace of Democratic policies, recounted how far the country has come since the great recession.“I remember coming onto this floor as a freshman in ’09,” he said. “The chaos in this economy was unbelievable. The amount of jobs we were losing, 600+k a month – equal to my whole population of my state. Unemployed! Boom Gone.”He says he and other freshmen wondered what they’d gotten into. Now the stock market is up, unemployment is down and the annual budget deficit has shrunk. Begich says there’s more to do and urged his colleagues to be optimistic.“People may be angry with us, but they want to know what we’re going to do to solve these incredible problems,” he said. “And it will be incumbent on the next Congress to sit down and work together. It’s going to be tough. Because the politics of today are about the moment in time. It’s not about the long term.”He told a few anecdotes about his time on Capitol Hill. Once, he said, he and his son Jacob dug out their car after a snow storm and parked it near the white-domed Capitol building.“Those who know me – I don’t really follow all the rules around this place,” Begich said. “We started walking through the Capitol with our snow shovels over our shoulders. The place was empty. And I realized what an incredible place this is…,” emotion choked off his words a few times during the speech, particularly when he spoke of his wife and son. “…You just see the history…and in a small way we were part of it.”Begich staffers sat in the back of the chamber, many in tears.As is the tradition, other senators stood to laud Begich. One was Mary Landrieu, a Louisiana Democrat who later said her own farewells. Landrieu says many senators assert their parents gave their lives to public service, but in Begich’s case, it’s quite true. Congressman Nick Begich’s plane disappeared en route to Juneau. As Landrieu noted, that left Mark and five siblings without a father.“So when Mark walked in here, the first day I met him, I don’t know what I was expecting, but I was expecting someone to have a heavy burden on their shoulders because of that,” she said.Instead, Landrieu says, Begich was one of the most optimistic people in the Senate, brimming with self confidence and encouraging to his peers.“And I know that his father is truly honored that he didn’t get bitter. He wasn’t angry. He accepted that as God’s will, which is a hard thing to accept,” Landrieu said. “And he just, just did so much for the community that his father loved, the state that his father loved.”Before Begich left the floor, senators stood in line to hug him. Their applause lasted nearly a minute. On Jan. 6, former Alaska Attorney General Dan Sullivan will be sworn in as Alaska’s 8th senator since statehood.last_img read more

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Bristol Bay Sockeyes Prey Quality Affected By Ocean Temperature

first_imgHaving healthy and plentiful returns of salmon each season is an important issue to subsistence, sport and commercial fishermen alike. But, relatively little is known about what happens to the fish once they leave their spawning grounds and head out to sea. A group of scientists have started investigating a piece of the puzzle in a survey of juvenile Bristol Bay sockeye salmon. Download AudioBristol Bay sockeye can account for nearly 60 percent of the world’s harvest each year. But, the fish’s returns vary greatly from year to year.Scientists believe a large portion of salmon mortality occurs in their first year at sea. And they think size can play a vital role in fish survival.(Alaska Department of Fish and Game photo)“So it’s important for them to be large and have extra lipid reserves before they go into the winter in order to survive,” Ellen Yasumiishi, a research fisheries biologist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said.A larger fat reserve means more energy for the salmon in winter, when food is more scarce.During the study, Yasumiishi and her team found that – no surprise – the smaller fish are typically at a disadvantage.“They swim slower and they have to compete for food with other fish, so they might not be getting as much food as they need to as the other fish,” she said. “And they might also be a prey item for larger species that feed on the smaller prey.”The study indicates salmon over 180 millimeters long – or about 7 inches – have the highest survival rates.Yasumiishi’s team also discovered a difference in diets between warm and cold years. She says in warmer years, juvenile salmon fed primarily on pollock.“Those are a lower-energy rich prey, and whereas in cold years they are feeding on euphasiids, which are crustaceans,” Yasumiishi said. “So it would be like the difference between me eating McDonald’s fish sticks for dinner and king crab.”“So that crab, that crustacean provides that extra lipid concentration that they need.”Yasumiishi says the difference in diet is likely a function of which types of prey are most abundant at the time.Even though the quality of prey differs depending on the ocean temperature, she says there are a number of other factors in play affecting salmon returns — which vary greatly, regardless of whether it’s a cold or warm year.Close to 54 million sockeye are projected to run in Bristol Bay in 2015 – which is the largest forecast in 20 years.last_img read more

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Classes resuming after Bethel school fire

first_imgThe remains of the Yup’ik immersion school on Wednesday after the Kilbuck campus fire. (Photo by Anna Rose MacArthur / KYUK)The Lower Kuskokwim School District has found temporary spaces to hold classes for both Ayaprun Elitnaurvik and the Kuskokwim Learning Academy students, the two schools housed in the Kilbuck building that was largely destroyed by Tuesday’s fire. The move will split both schools into different sites.KLA students resume classes today, Thursday, Nov. 5, at Yuut Elitnaurviat, also known as The Peoples’ Learning Center. There will also be classes held at the UAF- Kuskokwim Campus.KLA, as the school is commonly known, is an alternative school for students from throughout the Lower Kuskokwim School District. KLA boarding students are now being housed at the Yuut Yukon Dormitory.Ayaprun Elitnaurvik Yup’ik immersion students will resume school on Monday, Nov. 9. Those classes will be held at the LKSD district office for kindergarten through third grades. Grades four through six will be taught at the Gladys Jung Elementary. The district says it will send parents additional information about schedules and specific locations.According to a press release from LKSD Superintendent Dan Walker, these arrangements are temporary until a long-term solution is announced for the second semester. Walker says he hopes they will announce a long-term plan in the next few weeks.last_img read more

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Caelus Energy announces major cuts sharply criticizes Walker oil tax bill

first_imgCaelus Energy Alaska announced Friday, April 8 that it would cut its workforce by 25 percent in response to low oil prices and “uncertainty in Alaska’s oil tax system.” Website screenshot April 9, 2016.North Slope oil producer Caelus Energy announced Friday it will lay off 25 percent of its 80-person work force and suspend drilling at the Oooguruk oil field, potentially affecting hundreds more contractor jobs.In a sharply-worded letter to Governor Bill Walker, Caelus CEO James Musselman blamed not only low oil prices — but also the governor’s efforts to reform Alaska’s oil tax system.Musselman said the Walker administration’s proposals to scale back subsidies for smaller companies like Caelus — and to raise the minimum oil tax — have “significantly damaged investor confidence in Alaska.”“We feel like the proverbial canary in the coal mine,” Musselman wrote.On Saturday morning, Caelus senior vice president Pat Foley testified emotionally before the Senate Resources committee, which is considering the governor’s oil tax bill.“On Monday I’m going to have the very unpleasant task of sitting across the table from smart, hardworking, caring, dedicated, hopeful people, my companions, many of whom I’m honored to call my friends,” Foley told the committee, speaking via phone from Caelus headquarters in Dallas. “And I’m going to explain to them that within a matter of days, their employment will end. And I can assure you, no matter what side of that table you find yourself, it’ll be simply horrible.”Some lawmakers bristled at the suggestion that the state is responsible for the company’s struggles.Anchorage Democrat Bill Wielechowski asked Foley whether it was state policy or oil prices driving Caelus’s decision.“If the state were to make no changes to our oil tax structure, or our tax credit system, are you prepared to reverse your decision?” Wielechowski asked.“It is price that has forced us to make the decision that we’ve made,” Foley said. “But I’ve also testified that we hope for price recovery. And if the tax system becomes less favorable, it’s going to take a higher price in the future for us to re-initiate our drilling activities.”The announcement is the latest in a string of layoffs and reductions in Alaska’s oil and gas industry, as the price of oil remains stuck near $40 a barrel.BP and ConocoPhillips both announced layoffs in the past year, as have several oilfield contractors.last_img read more

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Alaska GOP votes to block 3 House reps from primaries

first_imgAlaska Republican Party leaders voted Saturday to block Homer Rep. Paul Seaton, Anchorage Rep. Gabrielle LeDoux and Rep. Louise Stutes of Kodiak from running in the party’s 2018 primaries.audioAll three representatives joined Democrats and independents last fall to form a bipartisan coalition, taking control of the House away from Republicans. The Republican Party’s state central committee said that violated a party rule about caucusing with other political parties and that the legislators misled voters when the joined the coalition.“The two penalties for that at the time are no financial support, access to our database and also granting the Republican Party the freedom to recruit a challenger,” Alaska Republican Party Chairman Tuckerman Babcock explained.Babcock said Saturday’s vote is an expansion of last year’s decision to deny the House members support.He said a court ruling in October, which determined that independents are allowed to run in Democratic primaries, also allows the Republican Party to block individuals from running as its nominee if they violate that party rule.Rep. Seaton said he hasn’t officially heard from the party about its decision and wasn’t made aware of Saturday’s vote.“I just don’t think this actually comports with state law,” Seaton said, “that people can excise people from their party or they can say, ‘Yes, you’re in the party, but we’re disallowing you personally from being able to run.’”Babcock wrote a letter to the state Division of Elections Monday, alerting Director Josie Bahnke of the party’s decision. Rule changes for the 2018 primaries were due in September, so it’s unclear whether the state will honor the change or decide it doesn’t comply with state law.Bahnke told KBBI in an email that the division plans to make its decision within a week.The state also appealed the October ruling to the Alaska Supreme Court, which could complicate the outcome. Babcock said the party knows the decision could go either way.“We’ll see how things unfold,” he added. “We don’t know if we’ll join with the Democratic Party in the defense of the decision, we don’t know if we’ll go to federal court, or we don’t know if we’ll just accept the state’s decision and just to state our position and let the voters decide.”Seaton, LeDoux and Stutes could still run as a Republicans next fall if they’re blocked from the primaries. Each would need to collect signatures in order to do so. They could also run as an independent or join another party’s ticket.last_img read more

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The US Forest Service sued over Kuiu Island timber sale

first_imgIn 2014, the U.S. Forest Service repaired streams on Kuiu Island damaged by logging in the 1970s. (Photo by Elizabeth Jenkins/KTOO)A controversial old growth timber sale in Southeast Alaska is going to court.Listen nowConservation groups and a tourism operator are suing the U.S. Forest Service over the Kuiu Island timber sale. The lawsuit was filed on Wednesday in Alaska’s federal district court.In 2016, the wood from the parcel was approved for export, but the forest service received zero bids in the sale.On May 5 of this year, the timber sale went out for bid again. This time, with less acreage than what was originally planned. The forest service removed some of the more sensitive watershed areas.The plaintiffs in the lawsuit allege the forest service’s environmental analysis is outdated and violates federal environmental protections. They’re concerned the logging would still damage important salmon habitat and wreck the view, which tour operators have come to rely on. The original environmental assessment was conducted by the forest service 11 years ago.The forest service is accepting bids on the Kuiu Island timber sale until June 5.last_img read more

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State backlog means long wait for health coverage for some Alaskans

first_imgJill Yordy and her daughter Raven, 5, are waiting for an application for Denali KidCare to be completed. The family is moving to Colorado. (Photo courtesy of Jill Yordy)There are 20,000 unresolved applications for Alaskans waiting for Medicaid and other public assistance programs.Listen nowThe state is taking action to reduce the backlog. But some people have been waiting for a long time.Anchorage resident Jill Yordy has been waiting since January to learn whether her five-year-old daughter Raven has qualified for Denali KidCare. That’s the state and federal program that provides health care to children in lower-income households, much like Medicaid does for adults.Yordy recently spent a day trying to learn more about Raven’s application. Since she couldn’t reach anyone on the phone, she waited in line at the Division of Public Assistance Anchorage office.“How are people supposed to keep jobs if they’re required to stand in these lines all day, without knowing when they’ll be seen, without knowing when their case will get an answer and you have to just stay there?” Yordy asked. “You’re chained to that office until your name is called, or you miss your chance.“Raven isn’t alone. More than 15,000 applications have been waiting more than four months to be processed. Some have it worse. One hundred and two have been waiting for more than three years.The state leaders who work on public assistance say the size of the backlog overstates the number of people actually waiting. The state uses two different computer systems to handle the applications. And they don’t always talk with each other when cases are resolved.Juneau resident Corey Peratrovich has a unique perspective on the backlog. Until February, he worked in a Division of Public Assistance office, including answering phone calls from those in the backlog.“There were times when I had over 100 calls per day … and they are very upset,” Peretrovich said. “There was a number of people who would use choice four-letter words and there were other people in tears.”Peratrovich left the job and applied for Medicaid in February. Now he’s part of the backlog. It’s been a confusing experience.“I’ve received a letter saying that I am approved for Medicaid; I was not approved for Medicaid; and then I was approved for Medicaid,” Peratrovich said. “So I received two letters saying approval, one letter saying denial and all these letters came in at the same time.”On the other end of the process is Matt Stangley. He’s been working on the backlog for the state as the chief of policy and program development for the division. He said the job of processing the applications has been stressful. The attrition rate doubled after the backlog grew four years ago.“They take these positions because they want to help people in need, right?” Stangley said. “They’re also human, so it’s hard not to take this job home. And they realize that there’s a large amount of work to be done, and they know the work that it takes to do that. So certainly that’s going to weigh on them and increase the stress that they feel.”The state plans to hire 20 new workers to handle the applications. The Legislature approved half the 40 workers Gov. Bill Walker’s administration requested.Stangley hopes that having more workers will improve the morale for the rest of the workers and reduce the attrition rate.“We’re grateful for the positions that we got,” Stangley said. “And we’re going to do the absolute best that we can with them. And then, obviously, we’ll report back to the Legislature next year.”Stangley said the backlog began to grow when the federal Affordable Care Act was rolled out. At the same time, a new state enrollment system wasn’t ready. People applied, didn’t hear back, and then they reapplied, adding to the backlog.Stangley said the state is working to speed up the applications for those with urgent needs. The state has hotlines to assist pregnant women and Alaskans requiring urgent care apply for public assistance.Stangley said the division has emphasized meeting applicants in person, rather than answering the phone. The new workers will be assigned to reduce the backlog and to rural offices.Jill Yordy won’t be waiting much longer for Raven’s Denali KidCare application to be processed. She and Raven are moving to Colorado. She would have liked to have seen the Legislature approve more workers to clear the backlog.“It sounds like a recipe for burnout to me for those employees,” Yordy said.Yordy is a former legislative aide who was statewide coordinator for Bernie Sanders’ 2016 presidential campaign. She said legislative candidates should do more for those in the backlog.“I think they need to spend at least one day of their campaign standing in line with everyone who’s waiting to get assistance and hearing their stories and hearing the struggles this backlog causes,” Yordy said.The state will start hiring the new workers in July.last_img read more

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Alaska law says lobbyists cant fundraise for candidates But the invitations keep

first_imgThe Alaska State Capitol in downtown Juneau. (Photo by Tripp J Crouse/KTOO)Some of Alaska’s most prominent lobbyists are boosting the fundraising efforts of political candidates – a practice that, according to a top enforcement official, appears to violate a state law that’s designed to limit lobbyists’ influence over the legislative process.Listen nowIn the past year, lobbyists Ashley Reed and Jerry Mackie have emailed clients and friends invitations to political fundraisers for candidates including Gov. Bill Walker, House Speaker Bryce Edgmon and state Sens. Kevin Meyer and Lyman Hoffman, both of whom sit in Senate leadership.That’s in spite of a state law that bars lobbyists from helping with legislative and gubernatorial candidates’ fundraising efforts. Penalties for violations include a fine capped at $1,000 and up to a year in prison.Both lobbyists said they received permission to send the invitations from the state’s lobbying enforcement agency, the Alaska Public Offices Commission. But the commission’s director, Heather Hebdon, said one of her employees had only issued non-binding, informal advice that won’t protect lobbyists against a complaint.Lawmakers approved the fundraising ban in 1992 as an anti-corruption measure, according to one of the advocates for the ban, former state Rep. David Finkelstein. When lobbyists help raise money for politicians’ campaigns, it can give them more leverage when they ask those politicians to vote in a particular way, Finkelstein said.“If someone raises you thousands and thousands of dollars, it’s hard not to feel beholden to them,” Finkelstein said. “I can say that out of personal experience.”Before the Legislature approved the ban, lobbyists were allowed to participate in political campaigns. And lawmakers often pressured them to help with fundraising, Finkelstein said, since many lobbyists’ clients are business and industry leaders who can write big checks.The law that Finkelstein helped pass says lobbyists can’t “directly or indirectly collect contributions” for candidates, and they can’t “otherwise engage in the fundraising activity of a legislative campaign or campaign for governor or lieutenant governor.” State regulations implementing the law say that lobbyists can’t solicit, collect, accept or deliver campaign funds or goods.Reed and Mackie represent some of the state and country’s largest corporations, plus a slew of nonprofits and tribal organizations. Each makes more than $700,000 a year to push the interests of their clients in the state Legislature and with executive branch agencies.In July, Reed – whose 15 clients include CVS Health, Wells Fargo Bank and Enstar Natural Gas – forwarded an emailed invitation to a fundraising lunch for Hoffman and Meyer.The event was held at Enstar’s Anchorage offices. The original invitation was written by one of the co-hosts of the lunch, Alaska State Chamber of Commerce President Curtis Thayer. Reed added his own message.“From my vantage point and perspective, these individuals have served the state well over the years. They are deserving of your support,” Reed wrote. “Please read the invitation below.”Reed’s email also included a disclaimer that acknowledged the legal prohibition on fundraising. It said: “This correspondence is NOT a solicitation; rather, it is intended to be advisory in nature.”Reed has also sent invitations on behalf of two Anchorage Republicans – Josh Revak, who’s running for a state House seat on the lower Hillside, and incumbent Sen. Mia Costello, according to copies obtained by Alaska Public Media.Mackie, meanwhile, last month sent an email that attached an invitation to a fundraiser for Hoffman and House Speaker Bryce Edgmon. Mackie, whose 20 clients include AT&T, Arctic Slope Regional Corp. and cruise line Holland America., did not write a message of his own.He also texted invitations last year to a fundraiser for Walker and to another event jointly benefiting Hoffman and Edgmon, according to a copy of the texts obtained by Alaska Public Media.In phone interviews, Reed and Mackie both said they thought their activity was authorized by the public offices commission.Mackie cited a legal interpretation he asked for last year from an employee at the commission, also known as APOC.The interpretation came from the commission’s lobbyist coordinator, Heather Dalberg, who’s a paralegal, not an attorney. She wrote that Mackie could inform people about fundraisers for candidates that Mackie personally supports, “as long as you are just informing and are in no way connected to the fundraiser.”The law contains a caveat that allows lobbyists to “personally advocate” for candidates in spite of the fundraising ban, Dalberg wrote.“Informing others of upcoming fundraisers for a candidate that a lobbyist personally supports is not prohibited,” she said.Mackie, a former state senator, said in a phone interview: “I did exactly what I was told by APOC that I could do, and nothing more.”Reed said he did not have any written guidance like Mackie’s. But he said he’s received similar advice in phone calls with commission employees.Any guidance that the lobbyists received from commission employees won’t insulate them from complaints, though, according to Hebdon, the commission’s executive director.Hebdon said information from phone calls like Reed’s, and even from a letter like Mackie’s, is non-binding, “informal advice” from staff that hasn’t been approved by her agency’s politically-appointed commissioners.The lobbyists could have asked the commissioners to issue a formal advisory opinion, Hebdon added. And she said she interprets the law differently from Dalberg, her employee who wrote the letter to Mackie.“A plain reading of the statute clearly prohibits anything to do with fundraisers,” Hebdon said. It’s pretty clear, she added, that lobbyists are barred from sending invitations.Lobbyists could cite informal advice to argue for reduced penalties if they’re found to have violated the law, Hebdon said. But, she added, “it certainly doesn’t protect them from a publicly-initiated complaint.”Reed and Mackie both said they would stop sending emails if Hebdon’s agency asks.“If the commission says we’re not supposed to do that, I won’t do it and I doubt any of the other lobbyists will do it,” Reed said.After the lobbying law was approved in the 1990s, the public offices commission addressed several formal requests for advisory opinions from lobbyists who wanted to understand the limits of the fundraising ban. But even after those opinions, the differences between allowed and illegal activity are still subtle.Lobbyists can’t work with a candidate or campaign staffer to determine the details of a fundraiser. But they can do limited “clerical” work to help clients, like businesses, that are organizing fundraisers, the commissioners said in a 1994 ruling.When asked, the commissioners couldn’t agree on whether it’s legal for a lobbyist to prepare a list of guests that their clients would use when sending fundraiser invitations — though the commission’s staff recommended that such activity be considered illegal.The commissioners have never issued an opinion directly addressing whether it’s legal for lobbyists, under their own names, to send invitations to fundraisers in email or text messages, like Mackie and Reed did.Reed described that practice as commonplace among lobbyists. He also said that legislators running for re-election often ask him to distribute invitations to their fundraisers.“When they ask for a favor, you try to help them,” Reed said.Four of the candidates whose fundraiser invitations were emailed by the lobbyists — Edgmon, Hoffman, Walker and Meyer — didn’t respond to requests for comment.Revak and Costello, whose fundraiser information was emailed by Reed, both said they didn’t asked him to do that.“I didn’t ask for his help,” Revak said. “I’m not trying to game the system here.”last_img read more

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49 Voices Mary Miner of Anchorage

first_imgMary Miner of Anchorage (Photo by Katie Writer, KTNA – Talkeetna)This week we’re hearing from Mary Miner from Anchorage. Miner helped to develop “Raven’s Roost” community living space, and is spending this winter at her cabin in Talkeetna. MINER: I actually got hired out of Portland to come to Alaska to do map-making, back in the day before computers and it was done by hand. And my boss came into my office in our work area in Portland and on Friday evening after work said, “Would you like to go to Alaska?” And I said I would love to. So Sunday morning I was in Anchorage, and I had 35 cents in my pocket, but I had a job. And that’s how I came to Alaska, I came to make maps. It was so much fun.The first time I ever saw the Chugach mountains, I just about fell over. And I still… the sky above the mountains, because of the air currents, the clouds there are so dramatic, and they’re just so beautiful. I never get tired of that. I never have gotten that feeling of awe, of how lucky I am to live in this place. It’s just so beautiful.I was taking flying lessons, and we were pre-flighting his plane one day at the Anchorage airport, and he said, “What are you doing with your life?” And I said, “Well, I’m studying geology.” And he laughed and he said, “Well if you wanna be poor all your life, go ahead and do that, but if you wanna make some money, you better get into engineering.” And I immediately went back that fall semester and switched into civil engineering. I figured he knew what he was talking about. He had a couple airplanes and he had a cabin down in Seldovia. He had a lot of cool stuff that I was thinking about.Our neighbors up there, the long time neighbors, there’s a number of people up there who are just the salt of the earth. They’re wonderful people. And they’re very quiet, and you don’t see them that much. But if you meet them on the trail and your snowmachine’s broken down, or their truck battery needs a jump, there’s a very strong sense of community that I get from the people who live out there. And there are some that’ve been out there for years, and we’ve never met them until just recently. That truly is the best part of being out there is our neighbors are all really really just super nice, super chill.last_img read more

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