Marin scores 20 to lift S. Utah over Bethesda 110-66

first_img Written by Associated Press Tags: Dre Marin/SUU Thunderbirds Basketball FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailCEDAR CITY, Utah (AP) — Dre Marin matched his career high with 20 points as Southern Utah romped past Bethesda 110-66 on Tuesday night.Dwayne Morgan had 18 points for Southern Utah. Jakolby Long added 16 points. Cameron Oluyitan had 15 points, seven rebounds and seven assists.The Thunderbirds are coming off their second-ever postseason appearance as they qualified for the CollegeInsider.com Postseason Tournament (CIT). SUU finished at .500 for the first time since the 2006-07 season at 17-17.Jonathan Akharoh had 16 points for the Flames. Eric LaShawn Hamilton added 13 points and seven rebounds. Kevlin Swint had six rebounds.Southern Utah takes on Nebraska on the road on Saturday. November 5, 2019 /Sports News – Local Marin scores 20 to lift S. Utah over Bethesda 110-66last_img read more

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Plans for New Skateboard Park Almost Ready for Public Input

first_imgMayor Jay Gillian on Thursday reconfirmed his commitment to rebuilding the Ocean City skateboard park that was dismantled in 2011, and City Council approved a plan that calls for spending $250,000 on it.But he released no information on where the park will be located, when it will be constructed or what form the park will take.A committee of elected officials (Councilmen Michael DeVlieger, Antwan McClellan and Michael Allegretto), city employees and local skaters continues to develop a plan for the park.DeVlieger said on Friday that plans possibly could be released for public review within the next few weeks.He helped put together a group of representatives of the Ocean City skating community who envision a park design that is “radically different” than that of the old park at Sixth Street and Boardwalk. The new park would cater more toward “carvers” and less to street skaters. The group envisions a concrete park that includes a bowl and a snake run. But it also would incorporate elements for street skaters, he said.“This is a park where our grandchildren will be able to skate when we’re done,” DeVlieger said.The cost of the park could exceed the allocated $250,000, and the committee is looking at outside sources to secure other funding.The former skate park included more temporary ramps and rails that city officials said posed a safety hazard when they dismantled it in 2011.A group of skaters, old and young, spoke in favor of the park and thanked the city for its work during public comment at Thursday’s City Council meeting.“I’d like to have a good budget on it,” Ocean City Intermediate School student Ricky Hardin said. “Not a low budget.”last_img read more

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New ‘Fire on the Beach’ Burns Bright on Asbury Avenue

first_imgNAMED FOR A BOOK ABOUT THE LIFE SAVING SERVICEEven the restaurant’s name comes from left of center.Charles Coburn said he chose it, in part, after reading “Fire on the Beach,” a 2001 book about the only all-black unit in the U.S. Life Saving Service, which performed dangerous rescues in the surf along the East Coast, and eventually became part of the U.S. Coast Guard. And the restaurant’s distinctive logo, a colorful fish, is based on a drawing by the late Grateful Dead leader Jerry Garcia.Charles Coburn calls Fire on the Beach a “farm-to-fork” restaurant, and he boasts “80 percent of my menu comes from within a hundred miles of here.”Baked goods come from Wards Pastry, nearby on Asbury Avenue. Fire on the Beach uses coffee beans roasted by Crescent Moon Coffee in Mullica Hill, Gloucester County. And Coburn buys seasonal vegetables from Blue Moon Acres in Pennington, Mercer County. (The Coburns grown some of their own ingredients, such as basil and kale, in three aeroponic Tower Gardens in the restaurant’s dining room.)Judith Coburn, a breast-cancer survivor who teaches chemistry and physics at Atlantic County Institute of Technology when she’s not at the restaurant, said there’s a benefit to using locally sourced ingredients.“It’s recycling money,” she said. “If you put money in your neighbor’s pocket, they’re going to put it back in yours.”Charles Coburn hopes that sense of community will carry Fire on the Beach beyond Labor Day and through the lean winter months. Except for a three-week vacation in January, Coburn plans to keep the restaurant open year-round.He’s planning a series of private tasting events during the fall and winter to benefit local charities such as Cape-Atlantic C.A.T.S. (Citizens Altering the Strays), an Ocean City-based organization that helps find homes for roughly 400 stray cats and kittens from the area each year. Local artists have offered to donate pieces of their work to be auctioned off during the events, Coburn said.And this fall, Fire on the Beach will start hosting regular open-mike nights featuring area musicians.Asked if he sees any similarities between being a rock ’n’ roll drummer and running a restaurant, Coburn said: “You have an audience. It’s a performance. For me, it’s performance art. The actual making of (the food), the stories behind it, the entertainment value.“I’ve been on stage since I was in second grade. I see no reason to get off now.” Since opening in April, Fire on the Beach has earned a reputation for original cuisine cooked with ingredients from local farms.By Tim Zatzariny Jr. For OCNJ DailyCharles Coburn does not need to tell you his life story.It’s on the menu at his new Ocean City restaurant, Fire on the Beach.“I can walk you through all of my menus and I can tell you a story about how each item came to be,’ said Coburn, 57, during a recent interview at the restaurant on Asbury Avenue.For example, in the mid-1970s, Coburn had a girlfriend who worked at the Taylor Pork Roll stand on the Boardwalk, “So I ate a lot of pork roll.”The Jersey Devil (Taylor pork roll, cheddar, poached eggs and Dijon Hollandaise on an open-faced, fresh-baked biscuit) from Fire on the Beach’s breakfast menu, is Coburn’s tribute to that long-ago summer.Charles and Judith Coburn are the owners and operators of the new Fire on the Beach restaurant on the 900 block of Asbury Avenue in Ocean City, NJ.And the PBBJ French Toast (stuffed with peanut butter and bananas, and covered with warm, house-made fruit preserves) honors a family member.“My father swore by the fact that he could eat a peanut-butter sandwich for breakfast, lunch and dinner and never miss any other food,” Coburn recalled with a laugh.The Pleasantville High School graduate takes pride in bucking typical shore fare such as pizza and fries, in favor of an offbeat menu built on ingredients sourced mostly from area farms and dairies.__________Fire on the Beach949 Asbury Ave., Ocean City(609) 840-6822fireonthebeachnj.comHours: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)Dinner reservations accepted__________The burgers at Fire on the Beach are made with a house blend of beef ground especially for the restaurant, Coburn said. And the seafood items on the menu’s “Gallery Bites” small-plates section, such as sake-poached scallops and buttermilk oysters, come from local purveyors.Coburn admits that trying something different in a town steeped in tradition is a big risk, but one he says is paying off since Fire on the Beach opened April 17.“Now, you can’t even come here to dinner unless you have reservations,” he said of the 58-seat restaurant he runs with his wife of four years, Judith.The focus at Fire on the Beach, he said, is on an overall experience, not just stuffing one’s face.“Dining involves ambience. It involves the artwork, the music, the temperature, the color of the walls what your server’s wearing, how they treat you,” he said. “It involves how the food is presented. It involves a story behind everything.”The dining room at Fire on the Beach doubles as an art gallery — its walls covered with paintings and photographs by local artists. All the artwork is for sale.Charles Coburn, a self-proclaimed “foodie,” has spent most of his adult life in the culinary industry, as a well-traveled consultant, chef and restaurant owner (he’s worked everywhere from Florida to the island of Dominica in the Caribbean.) That is, when he wasn’t behind a drum kit. Coburn spent decades keeping the beat in area rock bands, and he hasn’t lost the look: granny-glasses, mustache, soul patch.Nor has he lost his sense of showmanship. As a group of diners left the restaurant on a recent morning, Coburn shouted after them, ““Come back a couple hundred more times this week, huh?”Charles Coburn was working in the kitchen at the Princeton in Avalon last year when he learned through a co-worker that the building at 949 Asbury Ave. was available (the spot formerly housed Sunrise Café, which relocated to 12th Street and Asbury Avenue earlier this year.)The Coburns, who live in Egg Harbor Township, decided they’d try to make Ocean City a “culinary destination,” even though it’s a dry town, Charles Coburn said.The challenge he said, was to create “a whole concept so different that you could justify driving from Vineland, from Hammonton, from Cape May, making it a point to come here.”And he’s willing to go out of his way for the right ingredients. Coburn buys organic, made-to-order grits, oatmeal, grains and flour directly from Anson Mills in South Carolina. Irish oatmeal (slow-cooked steel cut oats, apples, cinnamon, lavender, butter and sweet cream) is the runaway customer favorite on the breakfast menu at Fire on the Beach, Coburn said.last_img read more

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Union to ballot staff at Maple Leaf for strike

first_imgStaff at the Maple Leaf bakery plant in Walsall are to be balloted on industrial action, following a breakdown in negotiations over pay rates.John Higgins, regional officer of the Bakers Food and Allied Workers Union, said that balloting would begin on 22 June. He told British Baker: “Our members have been told to sign new contracts at lower rates. We have advised them to sign, but with a letter of protest. However, this has been rejected by management.” A company spokesman for Maple Leaf said: “We are in ongoing discussions with our staff and are hopeful of a settlement. So far we have received no notification from the union of their intention to ballot for a mandate to call a strike.”In a letter sent to workers at the Walsall unit, published in the Express & Star, plant manager Dave Martin said: “Our site is unprofitable and our products are uncompetitive. Altering the rates will provide both flexibility and competitiveness to our site, which, in turn, will improve our volume and revenue […]. “In the event that individuals refuse to agree to the rates, the company will need to consider terminating those individuals’ employment.”last_img read more

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Trail Mix: The Story of J.P. Harris

first_imgOver the many years that I have been contributing pieces to Blue Ridge Outdoors, I have had the pleasure of chatting with a wide variety of incredible musicians. From the iconic to the unknown, this blog has brought me into contact with a dizzying array of colorful characters.None, perhaps, has been more colorful than J.P. Harris.J.P’s story is nothing if not interesting; now in his early thirties, he’s been on his own since the age of fourteen. He’s traveled the country by foot and freight train, worked as a lumberjack, carpenter, luthier, and laborer. He’s grown more cubic feet of beard than he can ever count, covered his body in tattoos, and cut I’ll Keep Calling, his first record, in just three days.I first interviewed Harris a couple years ago, right around the time he released I’ll Keep Calling; our chat lasted for around two hours. Once I got J.P. rolling, I had to grab hold and hang on. Unabashed in his opinions and more than willing to share them, we rolled through a variety of topics, including iconic country songwriters, the state of country music, and more. J.P. pulled no punches; what I got was the real deal and perfectly honest. It was gold.J.P. is one of a handful of young artists out there making country music the way country music is supposed to sound. Take a listen to his latest record, Home Is Where The Hurt Is, cut with his band, The Tough Choices. You won’t find any hip grindin’ and backwards ball caps, no lifted trucks or homages to cut off denim jeans or dusty river roads. J.P. doesn’t churn out modern country fodder like those many “Nashville pop country jerk offs” – a term he coined but one that I have purloined, because I love it.Instead, Harris’s songs are a scuffed boot to the belly, the soundtrack for love and loss, heartache and pain, all backed by the moan of pedal steel and vintage Fender Telecaster. It’s old country.I recently chatted with J.P. and played a little word association game with him. I threw some words at him and he responded with the first thing that came to mind. As you can imagine, it was pretty entertaining…Blue Ridge Outdoors – Clean shaven faces.J.P. Harris – A lot of extra work in the morning.BRO – Wrapping up a record.J.P. – So much still left to do.BRO – Bad tattoos.J.P. – Good stories.BRO – Working with your hands.J.P. – Part of understanding what truth in work really is.BRO – Life on the rails.J.P. – Fun. Romantic. Dangerous. Everything you hope it would be.BRO – Bro-country.J.P. – Garbage truck.BRO – Country music.J.P. – Good for what ails you.J.P. Harris & The Tough Choices will be all over Virginia in early November. You can catch them at the Lyric Theater in Blacksburg on November 7, Wolf Hills Brewing Company in Abingdon on November 8, The Palisades in Eggleston on November 9, and at Balliceaux in Richmond on November 12.Also, be sure to take a listen to “Give a Little Lovin’,” the brand new track from J.P Harris & The Tough Choices, on this month’s Trail Mix.For more information on J.P., his band, more show dates, or how to get your hands on Home Is Where The Hurt Is, surf over to ilovehonkytonk.com.last_img read more

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What the FFIEC Cybersecurity Assessment Tool tells you about vulnerabilities and penetration testing

first_imgAs you probably already know, the FFIEC released its Cybersecurity Assessment Tool (CAT) on June 15, 2015.  The tool is intended to be a self-study by the organization, to determine if their maturity level matches the level of inherent risk in the organization.  But you can learn a lot by reading and analyzing the declarative statements in the maturity assessment portion of the CAT.  In this article I’ll discuss the declarative statements in the Maturity Level of Baseline, as they relates to vulnerability detection.BASELINE MATURITYD3.DC.Th.B.1 – Independent testing (including penetration testing and vulnerability scanning) is conducted according to the risk assessment for external facing systems and the internal network. (FFIEC Information Security Booklet, page 61)  This of course means you need to have a third party who will be impartial, conduct penetration testing and vulnerability scanning on BOTH your external facing systems and your internal network.  Vulnerability management is the first line of defense against vulnerabilities.   This means you should be scanning for vulnerabilities on a schedule appropriate for your organization’s maturity, generating reports, and turning the reports over to the individuals responsible for remediating your found vulnerabilities.  Many organizations scan on a monthly basis as a rule of thumb, but organizations with different maturity levels scan either more or less frequently.  It’s important to gauge how soon you can make an impact on remediating vulnerabilities prior to running the next scan.  For example, you probably shouldn’t run scans weekly if you aren’t planning to fix anything for a month.  But you could run scans weekly and decide to remediate all the high risk vulnerabilities on critical assets.  Whatever you decide to do, it’s important to have a planned and documented vulnerability management process.  Of course, this may be largely dependent on available personnel.  Scanning is an automated process, and many organizations (and vendors) confuse vulnerability scanning with penetration testing, which are two entirely separate services with different goals.  According to the FFIEC, “A vulnerability assessment is a process that defines, identifies, and classifies the vulnerabilities in a computer, network, or communications infrastructure…  A penetration test subjects a system to real-world attacks selected and conducted by the testers. A penetration test targets systems and users to identify weaknesses in business processes and technical controls. The test mimics a threat source’s search for and exploitation of vulnerabilities to demonstrate a potential for loss.”  Some organizations believe vulnerability scanning covers them for penetration testing too, which is not true.  A true penetration test may begin with a scan, but the automation ends there.  A penetration test is typically a manual process where someone attempts to breach your system simulating real-world attacks, as a hacker would.   Additionally, many institutions fail to conduct internal testing which can be dangerous, since insiders have the ability to create problems in your system whether intentionally or unintentionally.  This is likely because the internal tests are often overlooked, or left out of the budget to reduce cost.  (See Accounting for Internal Threats to Your Network.)  So not only should External Penetration Tests be done on a regular basis, but Internal Penetration Tests should be done as well.  This baseline declarative statement also mentions a Risk Assessment.  Many organizations start their IT Security program with an IT Risk Assessment which is good practice.  This allows the organization to determine potential problem areas, probability of a threat, and the resulting financial consequences should appropriate controls not be in place.  This also helps the organization budget monies on the most effective protection appropriate for the organization.  D3.DX.TH.B.2 – Antivirus and anti-malware tools are used to detect attacks. (FFIEC Information Security Booklet, page 55) Antivirus and anti-malware tools are not the same as vulnerability scanning, but both are important.  The vulnerability scans looks for improperly configured services and settings on your network, out-of-date software, etc., and is intended to help you find places in your system where vulnerabilities may accommodate threats to compromise your system.  Antivirus and anti-malware tools try to prevent threats from making it onto your network.  You need to have all of these in place, as they all play a role in your overall IT security program.  It’s important to keep these services in place and not allow a lapse in service.  D3.DC.Th.B.2 – Firewall rules are audited or verified at least quarterly. (FFIEC Information Security Booklet, page 82) Amazingly, this is an often overlooked, but important activity in your IT Security program.  Conditions change often and so too will your need to review your firewall rules to make sure they are still valid and will protect your system from unwanted consequences.  The hackers are getting smarter and smarter, and you really need to audit your firewall rules on a regular basis.  As indicated here, the FFIEC CSAT recommends a minimum of quarterly.  D3.DC.Th.B.4 – E-mail protection mechanisms are used to filter for common cyber threats (e.g., attached malware or malicious links). (FFIEC Information Security Booklet, page 39) This is perhaps one of the most effective ways of preventing your employees and vendors who share your system, from opening up email attachments or clicking on links.  This takes the antivirus/antimalware protection to the next level.  The idea here is to isolate and scan anytime an attachment is opened or a link clicked inside an email.  There are ways to prevent employees from doing this altogether but the difficulty often outweighs the benefit.  Again, it depends a lot on the organization and the risk appetite involved.  There are many organization who block the use of thumb drives on their devices as well.If you have achieved all of the maturity levels listed in this article, you have probably reached the Baseline level.  That may or may not be appropriate for your organization.  It’s up to your executive group to determine what level of maturity you want to achieve.  And remember, it’s an ongoing process.  If you haven’t yet achieved Baseline Maturity, then you are at risk of possibly being out of compliance.   61SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Robert Yowell Robert is a pragmatic leader, strategic planner, and resourceful management professional with distinguished career designing solutions to meet company goals and objectives in a variety of technical services and customer … Web: https://www.tracesecurity.com Detailslast_img read more

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CDC: Resistance makes 2 older flu drugs ineffective

first_imgJan 14, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The dominant strain of influenza virus in the United States has unexpectedly turned highly resistant to the two older antiviral flu drugs in use, prompting federal health officials today to advise physicians to stop using them for the rest of this season.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that clinicians should stop prescribing amantadine and rimantadine, known as adamantanes, and substitute one of the two neuraminidase inhibitors—oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza). Oseltamivir and zanamivir are newer and more costly than amantadine and rimantadine, and many countries are stockpiling oseltamivir for possible use if the H5N1 avian flu virus evolves into a pandemic strain of flu.The CDC tested 120 influenza A(H3N2) virus isolates from around the nation and found that 109 of them, or 91%, were resistant to amantadine and rimantadine. That compares with 11% last year and only 1.9% the year before, the agency said.”What this means is that clinicians should not use amantadine or rimantadine to treat influenza because the drugs will not be effective,” CDC Director Dr. Julie Gerberding said at an unusual Saturday press teleconference today.”We don’t think this is going to affect a large number of patients, because not many patients typically are treated with these drugs,” Gerberding said.She explained that oseltamivir and zanamivir have increasingly been replacing amantadine and rimantadine, though she couldn’t give any figures. The newer drugs are effective against both A and B types of flu, whereas the older drugs work only for type A, and the newer drugs also may have fewer side effects, she said.Gerberding said the supply of oseltamivir for treating seasonal flu should be adequate even though the limited production capacity of Roche, the manufacturer, has hampered countries’ efforts to stockpile it in case of a pandemic.”We understand there’s a bottleneck of production that’s limiting our ability to build a stockpile, but . . . we’ve not experienced any shortages for treating patients,” she said. “The amount of Tamiflu in our stockpile far exceeds the amount of antivirals that have ever been used to treat influenza.”Gerberding said the CDC expects that oseltamivir and zanamivir will remain effective for treating flu “for the foreseeable future.” All H3 and H1 viruses tested have been susceptible to them, the agency said.Patients who are currently being treated with amantadine or rimantadine should be switched to one of the newer drugs immediately, she said.Using a new, high-throughput test for viral resistance, CDC scientists first noted the high frequency of resistance yesterday, Gerberding. But they wanted to confirm the findings further before making an announcement.”We just didn’t feel it was responsible to wait 3 more days to get through the [holiday] weekend,” she said in explaining the decision to announce the news today.”We don’t know what accounts for this unexpected increase in resistance,” Gerberding said. She said it could result from a spontaneous mutation or it could relate to overuse of amantadine and rimantadine in countries where the drugs don’t require a prescription.Resistance to the drugs has been increasing globally in recent years, she said, adding, “There is certainly a trend in the direction of increasing resistance, but I don’t think we were expecting it to be so dramatic so soon this year.”A CDC advisory for clinicians says that a single point mutation at any of five amino acid positions on the flu virus’s M2 protein can confer resistance to both amantadine and rimantadine. The mutation does not decrease the virus’s transmissibility.Gerberding said there is no evidence that the increased resistance makes H3N2 viruses more virulent.She stressed that the resistance finding pertains only to “good old, garden-variety seasonal flu” and is unrelated to avian flu or a potential flu pandemic.However, the CDC has been monitoring H5N1 avian flu viruses as they have become available, she said. “Some are susceptible to these drugs and some are resistant to these drugs,” she said. “I think the lesson here is that flu constantly evolves and you’re always one mutation away from increased resistance.”Countries have not stockpiled amantadine or rimantadine for use in a flu pandemic, because many of the H5N1 virus samples from Asia have been resistant to them. However, in recent months some H5N1 strains have been reported to be susceptible to the two drugs.Seasonal flu activity is beginning to increase around the country, with 18 states reporting either widespread or regional activity, the CDC said in a news release today.”This year over 80 million doses of vaccine have been distributed but remaining supplies vary from state to state so individuals may have to check with more than one provider to receive vaccine,” the agency said. “Also, CDC will have available 3.5 million doses from its stockpile to sell through manufacturers as soon as possible. In addition there are doses of vaccine presently available for sale by manufacturers and distributors.”See also:CDC information on antiviral drugs for influenzahttp://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/treatment/last_img read more

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Children raised in meth labs

first_imgNZ Herald 2 June 2013Police have found children living in a P lab with drugs and two loaded rifles inside the house – yet Child Youth and Family had “no care and protection concerns” for the youngsters.The lab was one of nearly 800 police raided from 2006-2010. In total police found 384 kids in 199 labs. But convictions for neglect or abuse of the children were obtained for only 19 labs.Police photos show drug gear stored in children’s lunch boxes, kids’ fizzy drink bottles and in a suitcase under a 12-year-old’s bed.CYF will not say what has happened to the children, rescued between 2006 and 2010, but some were returned to the care of bailed P cooks.Lawyer Chloe Barker, who uncovered the cases, said new targeted child welfare laws were needed.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10887922last_img read more

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Taylor through to semi-finals

first_img Ochigava, whom Taylor defeated to win Olympic gold at London 2012, failed to weigh in at the allotted time reportedly due to injury. Taylor will now meet Jinhua Yin in the 60kg semi-finals on Sunday as she bids to continue to path towards five straight golds. Ireland’s Katie Taylor guaranteed her fifth consecutive world medal with a walkover against Russian rival Sofya Ochigava at the women’s World Boxing Championships in Jeju City, South Korea. Press Associationlast_img

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Angry Pearson lays into Latics

first_img Pearson was initially bowled over on the touchline by McArthur after a tackle by Marc Albrighton, resulting in what was initially a friendly exchange between the Foxes boss and Palace midfielder. Pearson even playfully grabbed McArthur around the throat before helping him to his feet, only to then prevent him from returning to the pitch by grabbing hold of his shirt. Leicester manager Nigel Pearson has launched a critical attack on Wigan and former manager Uwe Rosler following a bizarre altercation with former transfer target James McArthur during his side’s 1-0 home defeat to Crystal Palace. Joe Ledley’s 55th-minute header was enough to give Crystal Palace a 1-0 win at the King Power Stadium, the club’s fifth victory in six matches since Alan Pardew took charge. The rock-bottom Foxes, meanwhile, are now on a run of three straight defeats, and with Arsenal, Everton and Manchester City up next there is every chance it could be six come their next home game against another relegation rival in Hull on March 14. Pearson, though, is doing his best to remain defiant as he said: “For myself as a manager that is bottom of the league what I cannot do is hide from the facts. “We are where we are, but so far we have not been beaten where we’ve been absolutely rolled over. “We’ve been competitive, but what we haven’t found are answers to days like this, a tight game which we shouldn’t lose. “Instead we’ve been beaten by a side who set themselves out to be difficult to play against, but you can’t underestimate the fact they have some decent players. “It’s a frustration, but what we mustn’t do – the club, players and management – is get downbeat by how people want to write us off after a result like this.” City should at least have taken a point as they had the chances, but either found Julian Speroni in fine form or wasted the opportunities that were presented. The closest they came was when David Nugent rattled the angle of bar and post with a header in the first half. Pearson added: “We had enough chances to get something from the game, but the big issue we have at the moment is our inability to take the chances when they come along. “That is the ultimate difference between the Premier League and the Championship. “All I can do is keep working with the players to turn it around, and we have good players here. “You would have targeted this game beforehand as something we needed to get something from, we’ve not done that and the gap is bigger, but there is still an awful long way to go.” By contrast, opposite number Pardew has turned Palace around, with his club now six points clear of the relegation zone. Pardew lost inspirational centre-back Scott Dann at the break after a clash of heads late in the first half with City skipper Wes Morgan. As it transpired, that proved to be a key moment for Pardew who added: “Scott has a large golf-ball-sized lump on his head from a clash with Morgan. “He wasn’t quite right at half time. I don’t think he was concussed, but he felt a little bit uncomfortable. “That actually turned out to be significant for us because (Brede) Hangeland came on and I thought he was our best player. “He was calm, great defensively, won everything and contributed to the goal, so kind of indirectly it worked for us.” Press Association Asked why he refused to let go of McArthur, who almost joined City last summer only for the club’s two bids of £5million and £7million to be rejected by Wigan, Pearson replied: “Because he said something to me.” Asked to elaborate, Pearson added: “I don’t have to reveal anything do I? I’m more than capable of looking after myself. “Listen, I’ve a lot of respect for the lad, he’s a good player. You know what happened in the summer in terms of him coming here. “I’m as disappointed as he was with how things panned out, but it was nothing to do with either myself or the player. “That’s the other football club that were involved who take absolute responsibility for anything that wasn’t quite right. “There was a certain manager (Rosler) who opened his trap when he should have kept his mouth shut. “But there’s no problem with the player. He’s a good player and a likeable lad.” The incident aside, Pearson i s adamant there are no long faces inside the club despite suffering a damaging defeat in their bid to beat relegation. last_img read more

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