Carbon dynamics of the Weddell Gyre, Southern Ocean

first_imgThe accumulation of carbon within the Weddell Gyre, and its exchanges across the gyre boundaries are investigated with three recent full-depth oceanographic sections enclosing this climatically-important region. The combination of carbon measurements with ocean circulation transport estimates from a box inverse analysis reveal that deep water transports associated with Warm Deep Water (WDW) and Weddell Sea Deep Water dominate the gyre’s carbon budget, while a dual-cell vertical overturning circulation leads to both upwelling and the delivery of large quantities of carbon to the deep ocean. Historical sea surface pCO2 observations, interpolated using a neural network technique, confirm the net summertime sink of 0.044 to 0.058 ± 0.010 Pg C yr-1 derived from the inversion. However, a wintertime outgassing signal similar in size results in a statistically insignificant annual air-to-sea CO2 flux of 0.002 ± 0.007 Pg C yr-1 (mean 1998-2011) to 0.012 ± 0.024 Pg C yr-1 (mean 2008-2010) to be diagnosed for the Weddell Gyre. A surface layer carbon balance, independently derived from in situ biogeochemical measurements reveals that freshwater inputs and biological drawdown decrease surface ocean inorganic carbon levels more than they are increased by WDW entrainment, resulting in an estimated annual carbon sink of 0.033 ± 0.021 Pg C yr-1. Although relatively less efficient for carbon uptake than the global oceans, the summertime Weddell Gyre suppresses the winter outgassing signal, while its biological pump and deep water formation act as key conduits for transporting natural and anthropogenic carbon to the deep ocean where they can reside for long timescales.last_img read more

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Police crack down on local clubs

first_imgPublic safety concernsFollowing a hearing on 18 March regarding Imperial’s licence, Oxford City Council licensing sub-committee decreed that there were significant concerns over “public safety and crime and disorder at the premises”, and that the licence would be suspended for six weeks after the appeal period was up. As a result of the hearing Mushab Ahmatov, the premises supervisor was removed from his position.From 1 April to 8 December 2007 there were 16 violent incidents at Imperial, and a further nine incidents requiring a police presence. Police also referred to another incident where between 15 and 20 men were involved in a fight on 16 February, but no bouncers got involved. “Steady drip of assaults and thefts”Richard Brown, Oxford’s City Centre Police Inspector, was present at the meeting as a representative of Thames Valley Police. He explained that the decision to review Imperial’s licence had been taken following a number of incidents since the beginning of this year. He said, “There were a number of violent disturbances both inside and outside the building. We were also concerned about the state of the premises itself, in particular the electrical safety.”Brown stressed that the licence suspension had been a last resort. He added, “We had had several meetings with the owners of the club and they hadn’t addressed the issues we raised.“The premises really came to our attention back in August and all the way through the autumn. There was a steady drip of assaults and thefts. Management did not seem to have a grip on controlling these incidents.”Tony Cope, the Police Licensing Officer, said that the police had actually asked for the revocation of the licence, but that suspension had been decided as the appropriate course of action during the hearing.Cope said, “There have been reports of underage drinking, drugs, and fights. Basically everything you don’t want in a nightclub.“We carried out a licensing check on 18 December and realized that there were a number of breaches to their licence. We gave them two months in which to address these breaches but there was no evidence that they had done anything about them.He added, “If Imperial does open again, then we will be monitoring it very carefully, and any further breaches will almost certainly result in revocation of their licence.” Eight clubs positive for Class AThe land is on a ten year lease from Christ Church, and a new lease holder, Mr McClure, has leased this for five years from the previous owners.McClure said, “Imperial has had problems with underage drinking and with violence outside the nightclub; the police also found evidence of Class-A drugs in the toilets.” In early February a high reading of cocaine was found after bathrooms were swabbed during a routine licensing check. Police have forced Imperial to close after suspending its licence in a clampdown on nighttime crime.In addition, the Bridge has been served with a licence review notice, following reports of violence and evidence of Class-A drugs on the premises of both clubs. Glass-free BridgeFollowing the decision to suspend Imperial’s licence, the Bridge nightclub has been given a licence review notice, imposing certain conditions on the way it operates. The nightclub faces a hearing on 29 April.Phil Davidson, owner of the Bridge said, “There have been a few incidents at the Bridge and we are working with the police to ensure that this number is reduced. Our main concern is to create an environment where, if trouble does start, it cannot turn into anything more.”As a result of the Council’s action both clubs are set to bring in sweeping changes.Davidson said that they were making the Bridge a glass-free zone. He said, “We are replacing all our glasses with polycarbonate ones and will be decanting all our bottles into these.”Imperial will be following suit and will also be introducing searches on entry when it reopens. Whilst these searches will technically be voluntary, anyone who refuses to be searched will not be admitted.A hearing is due to take place on 29 April but could be cancelled if the club resolves the concerns raised by the police. Inspector Brown said : “The owners of the Bridge are co-operating with the police and I am fairly certain that this will not result in the closure of the Bridge.”Louise Randall, OUSU Vice President (Welfare), said, “I welcome the news that the licences of such clubs are being monitored.“Students should be able to feel confident that the club nights they go to will be safe and fun. Sadly, if club owners are not willing to make the effort to provide these themselves, then sanctions on licences are necessary.” The drug traces were however not the reason for the suspension. McClure added, “this is run-of-the-mill stuff for nightclubs, it is nothing out of the ordinary, the police also found evidence of Class-A drugs in eight other clubs in Oxford.”Scott Grant, the Environmental Health Officer, said that a “huge list of problems” were found at another inspection that took place in December.Despite these problems, McClure is optimistic. He stated, “We hope to build Imperial into a thriving business, where people can have fun in a safe environment.” The club plans to have over-21s only nights on weekends and bring into place more stringent identification and search restrictions.last_img read more

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Stellar Communities Program Now Accepting Letters Of Intent

first_imgthe Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairsannounced that submissions are open for communities to submit letters of intent for the  Stellar Communities Program. Beginning in January 2018, the program evolved into to a regional partnership design which emphasizes collaboration in planning efforts between neighboring towns, cities and counties.“I want to encourage all communities and counties to apply and especially those with past Stellar Designees and Finalists,” said Jodi Golden, Executive Director of OCRA. “We received positive feedback from the 2018 finalists that the regional approach allowed for more collaborative possibilities and growth opportunities and we’re excited to continue that in 2019.”Overseen by Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch, the Stellar Communities Program is a multi-year, multi-million dollar investment initiative led by OCRA. This program works with communities in developing regional development plans, promoting local and regional partnerships and increasing economic development.The letter of intent submission process is completed through an online grant management system.  All regions must submit the required documentation in order to be considered. Letters of Intent are due by April 5, 2019 at 4:00 p.m. ET. A demonstration video is available to help familiarize applicants with the program.Eligible participants include local units of government that are a county, city or an incorporated town that participate in the Indiana Community Development Block Grant program. Those that are considered a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development recognized entitlement community are not eligible.This collaborative effort brings together mentorships and partnerships to advance comprehensive solutions to regional and local challenges throughout rural Indiana. All participating communities must commit at least four years to the project.Golden said to reach out to the agency to help provide assistance with the program.The Stellar Communities Program dedicated program manager, Michael Sinnet, is also available for consultation and assistance. An informational video on the overall program will be available on Jan. 30.  Click here for more information.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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“IS IT TRUE” December 6, 2019

first_img IS IT TRUE the Evansville City Council voted 8 to 1 to approve a $395 million budget for 2019? …that the 2019 budget was a 7% increase over the 2018 budget?  …we find it very interesting that a couple of our city officials are claiming that they held the line on spending for this year?IS IT TRUE when one is invited to a free lunch what does he order to drink?  …he orders two (2) pricey double cappuccinos on the house? … it’s now been alleged that this person has done this several times before? …we bet when he pays for his own lunch he orders water with lemon?IS IT TRUE in 1998 the Teamsters Local 215 established a Taft-Hartley Scholarship Fund? …the Trustees of the fund are Chuck Whobrey and Rick Voyles as employee Trustees and two Employer Trustees? ..since 1998 the fund has awarded over $3 Million Dollars in Scholarships to sons and daughters of Teamsters members whose employers contribute to the fund? …we look forward to publishing what worthy students will be awarded this scholarship for this year? …the CCO gives five (5) cheers to the Teamsters  Local 215 for establishing the Taft-Hartley Scholarship Fund?IS IT TRUE that our “Readers Poll” is non-scientific but trendy?Today’s “Readers Poll” question is: Would you purchase a Sunday printed edition of the City-County Observer for one buck?We are pleased to provide obituaries from area funeral homes at no cost.  We are also pleased to announce that we are now providing news from all the area High Schools.  Please scroll down the paper and you shall see a listing of them.If you would like to advertise on the CCO please contact us at City-County [email protected]:  Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer or our advertisers.We understand that sometimes people don’t always agree and discussions may become a little heated.  The use of offensive language, insults against commenters will not be tolerated and will be removed from our site.Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer or our advertisersFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare We hope that today’s “IS IT TRUE” will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way?IS IT TRUE earlier this week the consultants hired to design a new edition to the Vanderburgh County jail surprised those in attendance when they recommended that the County build an 89.1 million dollar,764-bed addition?  …we are told that several members of the Vanderburgh County Council are glad that there are four (4) other design options to choose from?  ..we are pleased that County Councilman Joe Kiefer insisted that public hearings be held at a later date to discuss this issue?  …we predict that this is definitely a developing story?IS IT TRUE that Evansville has one of the most charismatic and hard-working Mayors in years?  …Mr. Winnecke is also very personable and likable? …we wish that he would put more focus on budgetary issues and stop going along with every capital project that comes along?  …that Mayor Winnecke has a lot of talented people surrounding him and he should start seeking their advice before he agrees to invest money on any future big-ticket capital project?IS IT TRUE we have just been told that the old Evansville Courier and Press building has been sold and the new owners are moving in as we speak?IS IT TRUE for over a month we have predicted that the Evansville Park Commission will vote to shut down Wesselman Park Par 3 Golf course?  …on Wednesday the Evansville Park Commission followed through with our prediction?  …we now told that the dilapidated baseball fields located next to the Wesselman Par 3 Golf course may be the next public sporting facilities to be closed by the Evansville Park Commission?  …by doing so this will make way for Mayor Winnecke’s multi-million dollar “Robert’s Park” development?IS IT TRUE we are told that many people are serving on important City of Evansville  Boards and Commissions without pay?  …we wonder if anyone can tell us how much is the stipend that members of the Evansville Parks Board are receiving each year? …is the figure $1,500 or $3,000 or $5,000 yearly?IS IT TRUE we been told that it looks like the current attorney for the Evansville City Council will retain his position by a 6-3 margin? …could this be a good indication that legal skills are more important than a political party affiliation?IS IT TRUE that several people in the know are saying when the former two-term Evansville Mayor Jonathan Wienzaapfel couldn’t convince a Democratic-controlled City Council (7 to 2) to hire him as their legal adviser that it may cause him some problems when he runs for a Statewide office?IS IT TRUE we don’t believe the rumor that State Representative Ryan Hatfield bullied a newly elected City Council member when he was lobbying for their support for the Evansville City Council attorney position? …there a big difference between being overzealous in making a point or bullying someone?IS IT TRUE we are told that many people are wondering what would have happened if Democrat Chris Lockyear would have applied for the Evansville City Council attorney position?IS IT TRUE that Evansville has one of the most charismatic and hard-working Mayors in years?  …Mr. Winnecke is also very personable and likable? …we wish that he would put more focus on budgetary issues and stop going along with every capital project that comes along?  …that Mayor Winnecke has a lot of talented people surrounding him and he should start seeking their advice before he agrees to invest money on any future big-ticket capital project?IS IT TRUE we are hearing that there has been some quiet discussion concerning making some adjustments in the makeup of the CVC Board Of Directors? …some people feel that a couple of current board members have become a little nonresponsive towards the people that appoint them to this board?IS IT TRUE one of the best-known secrets in Vanderburgh County is the non-commissioned analysis that current Evansville City Controller and former Mayor Russ Lloyd, Jr. recently did concerning the outcome of the 2019 City election? …we are now told that some people feel that his analysis was somewhat interesting, a tad boring, and somewhat presumptuous? …we are also told by numerous sources that his analysis of the City Council Ward 1 winner could be considered somewhat out of line?IS IT TRUE that several supporters of the Fifth (5) Ward conservative City Councilman Justin Eplers are highly disappointed in him?  …the reason why they are upset with him is that he didn’t ask the hard questions when city funds were being transferred to one account to another during Monday’s night City Council meeting?  …we would like to point out to Mr. Elpers that transferring taxpayer money from one account to another isn’t the way to proper way to balance the city budget? …the proper way to balance a budget is to make needed cuts?IS IT TRUE starting on January 1, 2020, the State Board Of Accounts (SBOA) will give Governmental entities six (6) months to find a remedy to correct the problems of overdrawn city accounts? IS IT TRUE we are told that the practice of not posting unrecorded accounts payable in a timely manner will come to an end on January 1, 2020??  …starting on January 1, 2020, Finra and the SEC will require cities with populations greater than 100k to submit the year-end financial report to the State Board of Accounts by using the accrual method of accounting?IS IT TRUE that the Honorable Vanderburgh County Circuit Court Judge for Vanderburgh County David D. Kiely is doing an outstanding job as the Circuit Court Judge for Vanderburgh County?last_img read more

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In Short

first_imgCupcake Week on TVBritish Baker has secured Food Network as the official TV partner for National Cupcake Week. Established as the number one food channel in the US, it was launched in the UK in December 2009 and has become the fastest-growing food channel. Cupcake baker interviews and events surrounding our competition to find Britain’s cupcake champion will be broadcast during 13-19 September (Sky Channel 262).BSB Autumn eventThe British Society of Baking’s Autumn Conference will take place on 4-5 October at the Ardencote Manor Hotel, Warwick. Speakers include Ian Martin, bakery director at Asda; Ted Rich of Rich Products; Edward Garner of Kantar; Kevin Kingsland, occupational psychologist; CSM’s Roel Orsel; Archy Cunningham, of United Central Bakeries; and Tony Parsons. For a full programme send an email to: [email protected] Leaf ballotStaff at Maple Leaf Bakery’s site in Walsall were being balloted on a mandate for industrial action as BB went to press, following a breakdown in pay negotiations. A Maple Leaf spokesperson said the firm had met with the Bakers Food and Allied Workers’ Union on 19 July, and that balloting of its members would begin on 27 July for a week.Food price havocBanks have come under fire for risky and secretive gambling on coffee, cocoa and wheat, which is playing havoc with prices. Anti-poverty campaigning group, the World Development Movement, said banks’ dangerous speculation were causing a massive rise in food prices; cocoa prices have reached their highest levels for 33 years rising by 150% over 18 months.last_img read more

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Advice for scientists: ‘Be vocal’

first_imgU.S. scientists are bracing for a difficult time ahead, with an administration hostile to climate change science, dubious about environmental regulation, and seeking to dramatically slash some areas of the federal budget. They’re not alone, according to Carlos Moedas, the European Union’s commissioner for research, science, and innovation. Moedas, who visited campus this week, said scientists around the world are grappling with increased public skepticism, in part from the deluge of information — both accurate and inaccurate — we take in daily.  During his stay, Moedas spoke to students and delivered a public lecture, “Good Science for Good Politics,” in which he discussed an initiative to weave scientific advice into the work of the European Commission, which serves as the EU’s executive arm. The talk was organized by the Kennedy School’s Program on Science, Technology, and Society and co-sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.  Moedas also took time to sit down with the Gazette to discuss science in the post-truth age, the needs of policymakers, and the promise of digital technology in industry.GAZETTE: You’re here to talk about science and politics. How interconnected are those two subjects in the world today?MOEDAS: We live at a very difficult moment where people don’t believe anymore in facts and science. So it’s very important for a politician to be preaching the importance of scientific advice and the importance of evidence for policymaking. Somehow those two worlds got disconnected. You have to connect [them] back because if you want to do good policymaking, if you want to make good decisions, [they] have to be based on evidence, based on facts.GAZETTE: I’ve always thought of the idea of being in a “post-truth” era as being an American election construct. Is truth under attack as well in Europe?MOEDAS: I think it’s under attack everywhere in the world. The Oxford English Dictionary has chosen “post-truth” as the word for 2016. That’s something that scares me very much. So it’s a global phenomenon. People in the digital world are bombarded by information. People want it to be reliable and they want to trust it, but they don’t know where to go. We are all a bit lost in a world of information. It’s our responsibility to create hubs of trust, where people know where that independent information and independent facts are and where the truth is. More than ever, you need science to be the base of the decisions of politicians. That’s what we’re working on these days.GAZETTE: What do scientists not know about politics that they should?MOEDAS: That politics are not a rational process, because there are emotions [involved]. Scientists have to know where their limits are, and that they should not [become] issue advocates. They should be honest brokers of information and they should be the ones who give options to politicians. It’s very important to have scientists give a broad group of options that politicians then can choose [from, rather] than have scientists come to politicians to tell them that they should [do] this … and that they have no options. I think you always have options. ‘Merchants of Doubt’ co-author Oreskes makes case for science to speak up Bringing values, not just facts, to climate fight GAZETTE: What about issues like climate change — not just important on a global scale, but also pressing? You have an administration here in the U.S. that has indicated that it doesn’t want to make any movement on climate change. Consequently you have a March for Science planned for Washington this weekend. That seems to go against the honest broker paradigm that you outlined.MOEDAS: Look, I think that we live in a difficult moment worldwide. My role as a European politician is to create in Europe an environment where people believe in science, where science is valued, and where we have a system that is based on openness for science. We created this idea that our motto, or our vision, will be open innovation, open science, and openness to the world. That kind of became a political statement, but it was not a political statement to begin with.I’m a big believer that you can create more wealth and more jobs … when you attract talent from all over the world. … So I’m on the side of those who believe in openness. Science has been open for centuries. When Einstein wrote the general relativity paper, he was alone in his journey. Last year when [scientists] confirmed that gravitational waves were basically the proof that Einstein was right, that was a paper with 1,000 authors from all over the world.Today it’s impossible to do science in your own corner, in your own university, wherever you are. Harvard is one of the best in the world, but what I see here at the Kennedy School is a group of people from all over the world.GAZETTE: Is there a feeling among the European science community that over the next four years, possibly eight, they may need to push a little harder to lead the world on an issue like climate? Is there a feeling that American scientists may be having other problems — funding problems — to worry about?MOEDAS: We have an opportunity in Europe to be leaders in climate change actions and in everything related to the environment. If you [ask] me about European identity, what actually links all Europeans — very few things. We speak different languages and we are different countries and different people. But there’s one thing that links everybody. It’s that people are genuinely worried about the environment — in the street; it’s not just the specialists.For us it’s very important to keep the leadership in everything related to renewables, to storage of energy to … efficiency. We have the buy-in of the citizens and that’s fantastic. We hope that other countries follow. We have a very strong relationship with the United States, a relationship of scientists. [Scientists] come from Europe to the United States but also from the United States to Europe. I want that relationship to be alive, kicking.We are firm believers in Europe that we have to work quickly in terms of climate. That’s why we were so engaged in COP 21. So I hope that, of course, people in the United States help us on that.GAZETTE: What area of science do you feel has the most potential to transform people’s lives over the next 10 years?MOEDAS: What excites me the most is not an area of science, but this merger that you see between the physical world and the digital world. You have areas like food and energy, health and water, that will dramatically change from these mergers between the physical world and the digital world. We have to be very, very clear about the fact that for the future, everything related to research and innovation has a digital side to it.GAZETTE: Do you have a message for American scientists looking ahead to the future?MOEDAS: I don’t have a particular message to the American scientists. I have a message for all scientists. It’s they have to be more vocal about what they do. They have to fight harder, because I think times will be difficult for all of us in all parts of the world. Of course you see it in an American perspective. I see it in a European perspective. We’re having an election in France that will be very difficult this Sunday. We will have elections in other countries in Europe, we have fringes in society that don’t believe anymore in science, so scientists have to be more vocal than they were in the past. I think the March for Science is an excellent idea. I’ll be marching in Lisbon with the Portuguese scientists. It has to be a positive march. It’s a march about the fact that you need science to make decisions, you need science to create jobs, and you need science to fill people with the sense of purpose in life too. So my message is: Be vocal. Talk about it, tell your story. Politicians alone cannot help you.Interview was edited for length and clarity. Relatedlast_img read more

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Basketball registration ends Fri.

first_imgBookstore Basketball, the world’s largest outdoor five-on-five basketball tournament, is just around the corner, and the tournament’s organizers are hoping to break their own record by garnering even more teams to play than last year’s 650.Registration for the open and women’s tournaments ends Friday at 5 p.m., but the main goal of the tournament’s executive staff is to raise money and awareness for Jumpball, a basketball camp that provides free instruction and lunch to children in and around Kingston, Jamaica.“The more teams that participate, the more funding we get for the camp,” tournament organizer Jack Goonan, a junior, said. “We want to give kids the chance to play because they have limited funds and opportunities to do so.”Tournament organizer Kelly Flynn, a junior, said Bookstore Basketball funds the entire camp by itself. Last year’s tournament raised $12,000 for the Kingston camp and its satellite locations, making the camp completely free for its participants and providing equipment and personnel for the camp, she said.One of the camp’s coaches is from the Notre Dame community and two of the tournament’s commissioners travel to the camp every summer.“It’s a good charity and a good time, and you get to see where all the money goes to,” Goonan said.Goonan encouraged freshmen to sign up for the tournament since their participation is traditionally low.“Freshmen should sign up because it’s a long running Notre Dame tradition,” Goonan said. “If they sign up now, they can have four years of funny moments on the courts.”Although attracting more participation from the freshman class is a perennial concern, a more serious, time-consuming issue is the submission of inappropriate team names each year.“Every year, we have to sit and go through every single team name and approve them,” Flynn said. “Then, the Student Activities Office reviews and approves that list.”Flynn noted that many teams try to be as funny as possible in creating team names, but what is funny for college students is not always appropriate for such a highly publicized, University-sponsored event.The championship title is up for grabs because last year’s open winners, Hallelujah Holla Back, will not be competing this year, sophomore team member Dayne Crist said.“I can’t play this year because I’m recovering from ACL repair surgery, and [teammate] Joe Fauria transferred to UCLA,” said Crist, a quarterback on the Irish football team. “[Team member] Jonas Gray can’t play because of a new rule restricting football players from playing basketball.”Women’s tournament champions Four Girls and a Guy will be back to defend their title, under a new name with an additional teammate, said senior Molly McCarthy, a member of last year’s team who also helped organize the tournament.She said the team’s victory last year was especially meaningful because her father and teammate Jane Fleming’s father made a surprise appearance at the final game.“The victory with our dads watching is definitely one of my favorite college memories, but I expect nothing less than a great tournament this year,” McCarthy said. “It’ll be hard work to get back to the championship, but we look forward to every game.”The executive staff said they are enthusiastic about the tournament beginning.“We’ve been working on this since December, so it’s been a long process,” Flynn said. “We’re excited to see how many teams will come out.”This year’s open tournament will start on March 27 and end April 25. Any student, staff or faculty member from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross is invited to participate.The large number of teams requires the open tournament to be spread out over the course of a month. Because the women’s tournament only attracts around 70 teams, it begins later than the open tournament.The semifinals and finals will take place the same weekend as the annual Blue-Gold Game, which is set for April 24.last_img read more

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Students, alumni reflect on history of Notre Dame vs. USC rivalry

first_imgAs the Notre Dame vs. University of Southern California (USC) football game approaches, students and alumni prepare to witness once again the long-standing and celebrated rivalry between the two schools.One of the most widely-known rivalries in college football, the Notre Dame vs. USC faceoff began in 1926 and has occurred every year since, with the exception of 1943-1945 during World War II.How the rivalry actually began is a source of debate. Some cite a rumor that Bonnie Rockne, wife of Irish head coach Knute Rockne, was swayed by Marion Wilson, wife of USC athletic director Gywnn Wilson. Wilson’s argument, the rumor goes, was that a Notre Dame vs. USC rivalry would mean traveling to sunny and warm California for a bi-annual game during the frigid South Bend winter.Others claim the rivalry began because of the financial needs of the teams, as well as the friendship between Knute and Trojans head coach Howard Jones.Although there have been many famous games in this storied rivalry, the 1988 faceoff — wherein Notre Dame was ranked first in the nation and USC was ranked second with both teams carrying undefeated records — is remembered as one of the most nail biting yet.David Sauve (’90) attended the game at USC with a group of Notre Dame students.“For a period of about 20 years, the winners of the Notre Dame vs. USC game was likely playing for the national championship,” Sauve said. “So for that particular game there was still a lot of energy. … That entire aura around that game was spectacular because of that noteworthy status of both of those teams.”Sauve said he sat on the Notre Dame side with other students, and with some USC alumni and fans in front of him.“[The USC alumni] were all very kind and courteous to us because they knew we were students and treated us very well during the game,” Sauve said.He said he remembers the moment he knew Notre Dame would win the game. It happened after the first play, he said, when Notre Dame player Raghib “Rocket” Ismail caught the football, even after quarterback Tony Rice slipped while throwing it.“You knew as a Notre Dame fan when you saw that play that we were going to be fine because they weren’t afraid to be aggressive and take the tact to USC,” Sauve said. “We were ecstatic. We knew, since that was the last game of the year, that wherever Notre Dame ended up they would be playing for the national championship.”This year, the USC game will take place at 7:30 p.m. at Notre Dame Stadium. Community members are preparing with anticipation for the faceoff.Sophomore Reynold Hamar, a board member of the Notre Dame California Student Club, has helped organize an alumni reception party for Notre Dame students and alumni from California visiting the University for this weekend’s game.“I’ve been counting down the days, especially knowing friends that go to USC,” Hamar said. “It’s such a fun day and so great for our school. The way it brings people together and the whole campus together, I think it’s incredible.”Originally from Southern California, Hamar said he is familiar with the long-standing rivalry between the two schools.“Growing up 45 minutes from USC campus, I grew up hating Notre Dame and cheering against it,” Hamar said. “It’s interesting because I feel like, for me, Notre Dame and USC practically don’t make sense to be rivals. They are not geographically related … but in a lot of ways that is what makes the rivalry. Midwest vs. California. City vs. rural. … Football is the perfect catalyst for that. …  It is definitely one of the best rivalries in college football.”Tags: Bonnie Rockne, football rivalry, Gywnn Wilson, Knute Rockne, Marion Wilson, Notre Dame versus University of Southern California, rivalrylast_img read more

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Groundbreaking today for $15 million Champlain College welcome center

first_imgA groundbreaking ceremony will be held today for Champlain College’s renovation of historic Perry Hall. The $15 million student “Welcome Center” is one of Vermont’s largest, non-transportation construction projects. President David F Finney said the project is important to both the college and Burlington, especially during the current economic conditions. When completed, Perry Hall will house the admissions, financial aid, student accounts and advising and registration departments.“This will greatly enhance the ability to serve our students better and show off one of Burlington’s historic architectural gems restored to its former glory,” Finney said. “A project of this scope, expected to take 14 to 16 months, will employ a large number of local workers, it will help to stimulate the local economy and perhaps most importantly, when finished will provide a great first impression of Champlain College and Burlington to visiting prospective students and their families.”Perry Hall, built in 1859 by lawyer and diplomat Edward Phelps, is one of only 11 houses in the South Willard Street Historic District that predates the Civil War.Work on restoring the 150-year-old Italianate-style brick home with elements of Greek Revival is expected to be completed in August 2010. “Now is also a good time for this project because construction costs are significantly lower than even a year ago at this time. We want it to be finished in time to welcome the incoming class of 2014,” Finney added.  “Champlain College enrollment numbers for 2010 look strong, so we are comfortable that our budget will be balanced in 2010. The Board of Trustees unanimously expressed confidence in the college’s ability to take on this project at this time,” said David Provost, Champlain’s senior vice president for finance.An addition to the west side of the historic building will include: an elevator, stairs, offices, restrooms and a presentation and conference room. The original structure’s open staircase, ornate historic details and ground floor rooms will be preserved and used for reception and conference spaces. Perry Hall’s former library space will house a collection of documents, photos and historic artifacts related to the Burlington Hill Section District.Original owner Edward Phelps, who served in the administrations of Presidents Cleveland and Fillmore, sold the home to local financier John J. Flynn in 1913. Flynn, the founder of Chittenden Bank and many other ventures throughout Vermont, was one of the largest landowners in Burlington at the time. His wife, Nellie, had a lifelong interest in native flora of Vermont, published the “Flora of Burlington” in 1911. Her extensive collection of 22,700 specimens is now part of a permanent collection of state flora at Goddard College. The Flynn name adorns Burlington’s famous theater, as well as Flynn Avenue. Upon his death in 1940, Flynn bequeathed the house to the City of Burlington to serve as a home for older men. However, faced with high operating costs for the home, the city sold it to Gilbert Brewer, who in turn sold the home to Dr. and Mrs. Martin Cannon in 1955. The Cannon family lived in the home until 2004 when Champlain College purchased it and renamed it Perry Hall in honor of the newly retired Champlain President Roger H. Perry. It has since remained vacant, but was maintained by the College during the planning and permit process leading toward final approval of the Perry Hall Restoration Project.The project includes plans to restore the front and rear lawns and create a new promenade walkway. Champlain College has granted an easement to the City of Burlington to maintain the west lawn of Perry Hall as open space available for public use. Formal gardens around the building will be planted in the spirit of Nellie Flynn’s native species studies. An innovative wetland garden will be created at the lower edge of the west lawn to absorb stormwater runoff.The plan also calls for energy-efficient climate control systems, including a geothermal pump from Perry Hall’s deep wells. The ultimate goal, Finney said, is to earn certification from The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. LEED recognizes performance in five key areas of human and environmental health: sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality. Engleberth Construction of Colchester will be the construction manager of the project.This past year, Champlain College completed the renovation of Aiken Hall, a circa 1885 brick manor house on campus using state-of-the-art preservation and restoration techniques emphasizing sustainability and reducing the impact on the environment.“We are thrilled to be moving ahead on this project to create a new administration and welcome center at the heart of the campus. It is a treasure from the past that we expect will be a landmark destination for many generations to come. I think our neighbors and visitors to Champlain will be pleased with the results when it opens next year,” Champlain College Trustee James Crook said.Champlain College, founded in 1878, offers “Education in Three Dimensions” – a distinctive educational approach to professionally focused majors, developing life skills and leadership based on critical and creative thinking. It has nearly 2,000 campus-based undergraduate students on campus and is ranked in the top tier of Best Baccalaureate Colleges in the North by 2009 America’s Best Colleges, published by U.S. News & World Report. To learn more about Champlain College, visit www.champlain.edu(link is external).         The groundbreaking ceremony will be held Thursday, May 28 from 4 to 5 pm at Perry Hall, 251 South Willard Street, Burlington.last_img read more

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Calvert County, Maryland: Fishing Southern Maryland

first_imgSurrounded by water on three sides, Calvert County, Marylandhas more than 140 miles of coast and waterway for fishing. For dinner with a view of the Chesapeake Bay, stop by the Rod ‘N’ Reel Restaurant for some of the best seafood on the bay. Overlooking the Patuxent River, The Pier offers fresh recipes and live music. Sample the flavors of Calvert County in the tasting rooms of the five wineries and six microbreweries in the area. Explore the shore You will find spot, croaker, and blue fish in the Patuxent River to the west. Launch your boat from Hallowing Point Boat Ramp or fish from the pier at Kings Landing Park. Solomons Boat Rental can meet your boat and equipment needs for a day on the water.  One fishing trip to Calvert County will have you coming back again and again. To the east, navigate the waters of the Chesapeake Bay for rockfish, white perch, Spanish mackerel, and more. Access fishing in the bay from one of several local parks and beaches, including the North Beach Pier, Breezy Point Beach, and Flag Ponds Nature Park. Hire one of several local fishing charters in the area for the best experience on the Chesapeake. These boat captains know the best spots, techniques, and bait around. Make your reservations in advance for your group from the “Charter Fishing Capital of Maryland.” Further your experience on the water with an excursion from Solomons Island Heritage Tours or Patuxent River Heritage Tours. See the lighthouses that helped guide boats into the harbor or try your hand at crab potting for the day. These professionals have a cruise for you. Captain George at Tyler’s Tackle Shop and Crab House can answer all your questions about fishing in Calvert County. Stock up on bait, tackle, and live or steamed blue crabs while you are there. Whether you want to spend the day fishing the bay or kayaking the river, Bunky’s Charter Boats can get you outfitted for the day. center_img Take the kids to the Chesapeake Beach Water Park for a day of water slides and wave pools or immerse yourself in the nature of the bald cypress forests at Battle Creek Cypress Swamp Sanctuary before heading into town for the night.   Unwind on one of Calvert’s many pristine beaches. Scan the shoreline of Calvert Cliffs State Park for megalodon shark’s teeth from prehistoric times. More than 600 species of fossils from 10 to 20 million years ago have been identified at this site. Hike through the marked trails for a closer look at more than 1,000 acres of designated wild land. Visit the Calvert Marine Museum for regional paleontology, estuarine life of the tidal Patuxent River and maritime history of the Chesapeake Bay. Whether you are looking for days filled with casting linesor exploring the town, choose Calvert County for your next bayside adventure. Maryland.Be Open For It. Walk along the boardwalk at North Beach’s public beach or rent a paddle board to float in the water. This waterside town has all that you need for a day of fun, including ice cream parlors, restaurants, boutique shops, and views of the bay. last_img read more

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