Bindi Irwin & Alexa PenaVega Embrace Their Inner Roxie & Velma

first_img Related Shows from $49.50 Chicago View Comments Bindi Irwin and Broadway alum Alexa PenaVega showed off their best Fosse-esque moves on week nine of Dancing With the Stars. PenaVega was (spoiler) eliminated at the end of the November 9 episode, but not before donning a Velma wig to perform a sparkly, flashy rendition of Chicago’s “All That Jazz” and “Hot Honey Rag” opposite Irwin’s Roxie and alongside their seasoned partners Derek Hough and Mark Ballas. Take a look below to see how they did! Wait a minute; is this all one big audition for the Weisslers?! If so, just remember: you saw it here first.last_img

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Suffolk Confirms First Female Police Commissioner

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Geraldine Hart, the FBI’s former Long Island office leader, officially became the Suffolk County Police Department’s first female commissioner after county legislators unanimously confirmed her historic appointment as top cop on Tuesday.After lawmakers on both sides of the aisle praised her, Hart was confirmed by a vote of 18-0. Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone chose her after his administration’s search of more than 100 candidates that applied for the position.“It is essential that we represent the population that we police,” Hart told the panel when asked how she will how more diverse officers. “It is a process that is slowly evolving…but it is a program that I would like to look into as far as mentoring to see what we can do once those officers are in the department, how we can get them hooked up with somebody who can show them the lay of the land.”With nearly 2,500 sworn members, the department is the 11th largest in the nation.Hart replaces Timothy Sini, the former police commissioner who was elected Suffolk County District Attorney last fall.She takes over shortly after the department was rocked by scandal. Former Suffolk Police Chief James Burke is serving federal prison time after pleading guilty to beating a handcuffed inmate and trying to cover it up.Her appointment also comes as the department is in the midst of a crackdown on the increasingly violent MS-13 street gang that has drawn national headlines for its crimes on LI and while Suffolk detectives are investigating the largest unsolved murder case in the department’s history after the discovery of 10 sets of human remains on Ocean Parkway nearly seven years ago.last_img read more

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System for global pandemic vaccine development challenged

first_imgFeb 6, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Indonesia, the country that has seen more human deaths from avian influenza H5N1 than any other, has ceased sharing viruses isolated from its patients with international health authorities, challenging the global system for flu-strain identification and vaccine development.The World Health Organization (WHO) has not received any viral isolates from Indonesia since the end of 2006, Dr. David Heymann, the agency’s acting assistant director-general for communicable diseases, said in a telephone briefing this morning.”We have been in discussions with the Ministry of Health since November of last year,” he said. “We will continue to work with them and with all countries to ensure this virus will remain somehow a public good.”Indonesia is also preparing to sign on Wednesday an agreement giving a single vaccine manufacturer rights to its isolates, Heymann said—though by the end of the day Tuesday, it remained unclear whether the agreement with Baxter International would block health authorities and other manufacturers from accessing the samples, or solely guarantee Indonesia’s right to purchase vaccines made from its viruses.The episode highlights the fragile and increasingly contentious system by which flu viruses—from both seasonal flu and novel strains such as avian influenza H5N1—are identified and shared around the world.Under that system, designed by the WHO with the agreement of its 193 member states, flu viruses are isolated in a country and analyzed to increasing levels of sophistication by a national lab, regional lab, and 1 of 4 WHO Influenza Collaborating Centers in Tokyo, Melbourne, London, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.Gene sequences from the analyses are used to identify emerging strains of flu—to track the evolution of the disease and, crucially for Tuesday’s news, to provide the basis for flu vaccines made by pharmaceutical companies.For about 50 years, the system has operated on goodwill, with its costs borne by the WHO membership and no compensation offered for viral contributions. There have been signs in recent months, though, that the agreement is breaking down.China last year refused for a time to share flu virus samples internationally, complaining that credit for discoveries was going to Western scientists at the top of the network’s pyramid rather than to the Chinese researchers who originated them.And last month, developing-world members of the WHO’s 34-country Executive Board complained at the board’s annual meeting that the system routes viral isolates, and the vaccines that result from them, away from the developing countries that lack the capacity to manufacture them but are likely to need them the most.”The pandemic will definitely occur in developing countries, not developed countries. But we are sending our virus (samples) to the rich countries to produce antivirals and vaccines. And when pandemic occurs, they survive and we die,” Suwit Wibulpolprasert of Thailand said in remarks carried by Reuters.”We are not opposing the sharing of information and virus, but on the condition that every country will have equal opportunity to get access to vaccine and anti-virals if such a pandemic occurs.”He was supported by Sameer Khalfan of Bahrain, who said: “There should be a fixed percentage of the vaccine produced for the pandemic strain for each region, proportionate to the population of each region, to ensure equitable and fair access.”At the end of the meeting, the board passed a resolution—to be sent to the full membership for a vote during May’s World Health Assembly—that pointedly said: “No national influenza centre laboratory, Global Influenza Surveillance Collaborating Centre or H5 Reference Laboratory should charge fees or sell influenza viruses or strains or in any way seek to profit from participation in the WHO Global Influenza Surveillance Network. . . . No national, influenza centre laboratory, Global Influenza Surveillance Collaborating Centre or H5 Reference Laboratory should impose agreements or administrative procedures that may inhibit the proper functioning of the WHO Global Influenza Surveillance Network, including in particular the timely sharing of material and information.”Indonesia is a WHO member state but does not belong to the executive board.In the teleconference Tuesday, Heymann said the virus-sharing relationship has broken down over twin concerns of intellectual property rights and vaccine access.”Their major concern is that the virus strain they have put into the WHO network . . . has been used by several manufacturers to develop vaccines,” he said. “Indonesia feels they must be getting some compensation for the use of their viruses in production and marketing of these vaccines.”In addition to intellectual property rights, Heymann said, the dispute hinges on the mismatch between where vaccine seed strains originate and where the vaccines that result from them are sold. Most vaccine manufacturers are in the industrialized world, whose countries are also the major markets for seasonal vaccine. If a pandemic strain arises and a vaccine can be developed against it, developing countries that also want to purchase it could find themselves at the end of a long queue.”Developing countries . . . would like to have their own stockpiles, or would like to have some benefit from the viruses that they have given, seeing that there is not great access to vaccines in the world,” Heymann said.Indonesia is due Wednesday to sign a memorandum of understanding with vaccine manufacturer Baxter International. How much that memo could alter the relationship with the global flu-identification effort is unclear.”We anticipate the MOU will then modify the way in which Indonesia participates in the network for sharing of novel influenza viruses,” Heymann said. But Baxter told the Financial Times and Canadian Press today that the agreement would not block the sharing of Indonesian viral samples with others.Whatever the memo’s content, the issue of developing countries’ desire to exert some self-protective control over flu-virus identification is unlikely to go away—as Heymann acknowledged Tuesday.”The solution to this certainly comes from a round table at which many people are seated; that round table has to include pharmaceutical companies developing vaccines, it has to include countries that are having human infections, it has to have countries in whose interest it is to have those viruses and it has to have international organizations,” he said. “We have begun those discussions with the pharmaceutical industry, with the governments, and we are gradually trying to come to a paradigm that will work.”last_img read more

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Unipension cites equity returns for schemes’ strong 2013

first_imgPetersen said Unipension produced one of the very best returns in the pensions industry for its scheme members over the last five years, both compared with traditional with-profits products and unit link pensions that had the same risk profile.He said the international economy was improving, and companies were tending to recognise that better times were on their way.“The optimism has rubbed off on the stock market in 2013, and this is why we have seen these price rises,” he said.However, while progress had been made in the world economy in 2013, there are still big challenges in the US and Western Europe in the form of high unemployment and low investment, Unipension said.Petersen said one of the most interesting topics in 2014 would be how the rollback of US expansionary fiscal policy will be received in the financial markets.“The US has pumped an almost unimaginable amount into circulation to stimulate the economy, and when the flow of cash stops as planned in 2014, the markets will have to deal with the new situation,” he said.On top of this, there are still problems in Southern European economies, which could well flare up again in 2014, he warned.But overall, he said the world economy was in better shape than a year ago. Denmark’s Unipension produced 2013 investment returns of between 8.3% and 9% for the three professional pension schemes it runs, and said returns were driven in particular by strong equities performance.The Architects’ Pension Fund returned 8.4%, the Pension Fund for Danish MAs, MSCs and PhDs (MP Pension) produced 8.3% and the Pension Fund for Agricultural Academics and Vets ended the year with a 9% return, Unipension reported in preliminary figures for last year.The 2013 returns are lower than investment profits the pensions administrator produced the year before, which were between 12.8% and 13.3% for the three pension funds.Niels Erik Petersen, head of investment at Unipension, said: “The return in 2013 was especially driven by shares, which have performed very well.”last_img read more

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Young Veterans Still Alive

first_imgNewsSports Young Veterans Still Alive by: – August 25, 2011 Sharing is caring! Tweet 17 Views   no discussions Young Veterans. Photo credit: DAVA Technical Committee.Young Veterans put up a strong fight to ensure that they lived to fight another day. Facing eliminations from the playoffs, Young Veterans defeated Club Olympia in 4 sets to force a game 3 in the LIME/Dominica Amateur Volleyball Association National Volleyball League semifinals.Young Veterans started off strong, winning the first set 25 – 15 before dropping the second set 26-24.After a slow start in the third set, Young Veterans picked up the pace and won the third and forth sets 25-21 and 25-15 respectively. The series is now tied at 1-1.The deciding game 3 is set for Thursday 25th at 7:30pm at the Point Michel Hardcourt.DAVA Technical Committeecenter_img Share Share Sharelast_img read more

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Duterte bans another US senator backing De Lima

first_imgUnited States Sen. Edward Markey joins fellow Democratic senators Dick Durbin and Patrick Leahy, authors of the entry ban amendment, in the list of American lawmakers barred from entering the Philippines. AP “Yes [the ban is extended] to Markey,”Panelo said in a message to the media on Wednesday. Markey, Durbin and Leahy are three of the 11 sponsors of Senate Resolution 142 passed by the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee calling for the release of De Lima from detention. US President Donald Trump has signed into law the 2020 national budget, which includes the Department of State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Appropriations Bill 2020 where a clause banning Philippine officials who detained De Lima is included. Panelo saidMarkey was included in the ban for supporting the travel restriction againstofficials involved in the detention of De Lima. President Rodrigo Duterte earlier banned US Senators Richard Durbin and Patrick Leahy from entering the country for calling for de Lima’s freedom from detention.center_img Panelo has said the possible change invisa rules for Americans is the administration’s way of resisting attempts byforeigners to meddle in the Philippines’ processes./PN MANILA – American Sen. Edward Markey ofMassachusetts was added to the list of United States lawmakers who were barredfrom entering the Philippines for calling for the release of Sen. Leila de Lima. Curiously, however, the entry ban is not yet extended to eight other US senators who sponsored the resolution namely Marco Rubio, Marsha Blackburn, Chris Coons, Jeff Merkley, Tina Smith, Brian Schatz, Dianne Feinstein and Benjamin Cardin.    President Duterte retaliated by orderingan entry ban against Durbin and Leahy and threatening to require Americans tosecure visas before coming to the Philippines.last_img read more

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Tip leads to arrest in tri-state property theft ring

first_imgLawrenceburg, IN— A lengthy investigation by the Dearborn County Sheriff’s Office and the Special Crimes Unit has resulted in the arrest of Danny “Troy” Denison, 56, of Aurora in connection with a tri-state area theft ring.According to Prosecutor Lynn Deddens, in January, police received a tip that individuals from Dearborn County were involved in the thefts of equipment as well as golf carts from all over the Tristate area of Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio. On March 2, police executed a search warrant for the property, residence, and outbuildings of Danny “Troy” Denison located in Aurora. Detectives located and seized multiple allegedly stolen items including a golf cart and blacktop roller.During the follow-up investigation, the Sheriff’s Office and Special Crimes Unit Detectives located five other stolen golf carts in Dearborn and Ripley County with the assistance of the Dillsboro Police Department, Lawrenceburg Police Department, Aurora Police Department and Rising Sun Police Department. The golf carts are alleged to have been stolen from a business in Mt. Vernon, the Dearborn Country Club, and Shawnee Lookout Golf Course. The blacktop roller was allegedly stolen from a barn located on State Route 48 in Lawrenceburg.Danny “Troy” Denison was arrested and charged on allegations of Corrupt Business Influence and Theft.last_img read more

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Munster reclaim top spot

first_img Tries from flanker Sean Dougall, Ireland wing Simon Zebo and centre James Downey were enough to move Munster back above provincial rivals Leinster as they registered their 13th league win of the campaign. The visitors had the edge in the forward battle and kicked astutely, while they also punished the home side’s mistakes at crucial moments. Davies, who had an off day with the boot, struck the upright with a long-range penalty, but with the clock ticking down to half-time, the Ospreys got the score they wanted through Wales squad member Ashley Beck. Beck had declared himself ‘not ready’ for Wales and their Six Nations clash with France as he continues his recovery from a hip problem. But there appeared nothing amiss with the classy centre as he shrugged off the challenge of Keatley before showing good pace and footwork to evade the cover and dive over for his fourth try of the season. Davies pulled the conversion attempt and was then short with a long-range penalty with the final kick of an entertaining half. Trailing 13-8 at the break, the Ospreys looked to pressurise Munster early in the second half, but were hit by a sucker punch five minutes after the restart. After a series of phases, the ball squirted out of a ruck 60 metres out. Ireland and British Lions wing Zebo collected, twisted out of the tackle and raced unopposed down the touchline for his side’s second try. As they attempted to haul themselves back into the contest, the Ospreys – who dominated second-half territory and possession – were denied a score after the television match official ruled hooker Scott Baldwin had made a double movement as he attempted to touch down. Davies found his range with a 68th-minute penalty to reduce the deficit to seven points, but moments later a break from replacement fly-half JJ Hanrahan put centre Downey away and he had enough strength and pace to touch down under the posts. Hanrahan’s conversion stretched the lead to 14 points, with the Ospreys’ misery compounded by Ryan Jones being sent to the sin bin late on. And despite Munster spending much of the second half on the back foot, their defence proved more than up to the task. Both teams went into the game shorn of Six Nations stars, with the Ospreys contingent watching from the stands following the win for Wales over France on Friday night. And they saw Munster take the lead after just five minutes. Opting against a kickable penalty at goal, the visitors instead went for a driving line-out and were rewarded when flanker Dougall touched down from powerful five-metre surge. Fly-half Ian Keatley converted from wide out. The Ospreys, fresh from their 75-7 hammering of Treviso a week earlier, looked threatening in attack with Fijian wing Aisea Natoga to the fore. But a strong Munster scrum allowed Keatley to extend his side’s advantage with a penalty after 16 minutes. The home side responded quickly with a successful kick from full-back Sam Davies, but Keatley restored Munster’s 10-point cushion with a fine strike from 40 metres. The home side were attempting to play with tempo, but were struggling to match Munster’s nous at the contact area. Munster returned to the top of the RaboDirect PRO12 table after seeing off the Ospreys 25-11 with a clinical display at Swansea’s Liberty Stadium. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Magpies to finalise coach shortlist

first_img Sources on Tyneside insist that no-one has yet been approached and certainly no offers have been made. However, it is understood that among the names which will be considered at this early stage are St Etienne’s Christophe Galtier, former Mainz boss Thomas Tuchel, Derby’s Steve McClaren, Bournemouth manager Eddie Howe and ex-England chief Glenn Hoddle. Galtier has already indicated that he will not walk out on his current employers this season, while Tuchel is currently taking a sabbatical and McClaren, who signed a new three-year deal last summer, has distanced himself from the vacancy. However, those details and possible resolutions will form part of the early discussions, and what is clear is that Charnley and Carr, who are being given free rein by owner Mike Ashley, will not appoint in haste. In the circumstances, Pardew’s assistant John Carver – he was criticised by some fans for fielding a weakened side for Saturday’s 1-0 FA Cup third-round defeat by Leicester, although later insisted it was as a result of injuries and fatigue – and first-team coach Steve Stone are likely to remain in charge for next weekend’s Barclays Premier League trip to Chelsea. The Magpies currently sit in 10th place in the table, with 27 points from their opening 20 fixtures, and the top-10 finish Ashley set as the minimum requirement for the season is now their only remaining objective. Press Association Sport understands managing director Lee Charnley and chief scout Graham Carr are drawing up a list of around 10 potential candidates to provide the basis for discussions early next week. That list will then be whittled down to the men the pair believe can fulfil the role of head coach at St James’ Park – and, perhaps more importantly, whether or not they are available, either immediately or at some point in the near future, and would work within the ‘continental’ model the club has adopted. Newcastle expect to complete the process of identifying potential replacements for Alan Pardew within the next 48 hours.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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South Florida’s throwback style a tactical challenge for Big East foes

first_imgLouisville head coach Rick Pitino compares playing against South Florida to getting a root canal.The slow, deliberate style of play orchestrated by USF head coach Stan Heath frustrates and sometimes flusters opponents. It’s an unusual style in the modern Big East, and it has forced opposing coaches to game plan accordingly.“They control the tempo, they use the clock,” Pitino said in the Big East coaches teleconference Jan. 10. “They play an old school-style of play where they play possession basketball, and they have a point guard that can dominate those possessions.”Heath holds onto a coaching style the Big East’s traditional powers have largely abandoned. Ball and tempo control is a priority for the Bulls. Heath teaches his players hard-nosed defense to draw out opponents’ possessions, but when teams resist the temptation of quick shots, the lack of possessions can backfire.Though it is effective in spurts, Big East teams have figured out how to get over the “root canal” this season after struggling against it last year. Heath continues to stick to his strategy even as USF (10-7, 1-4 Big East) has stumbled to a slow start in the conference.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe key for opponents this season has been controlling the tempo.“You’ve got to understand that certain nights you have to play slow and you’ve got to be better at playing their game than they are,” Pitino said. “If you can speed them up and have your runs, then obviously you’re in control of your own destiny.”The Bulls attempt to control the ball to limit opponent scoring. Heath has held this mantra as a coach since his time coaching under Tom Izzo at Michigan State. He taught it in one season as head coach at Kent State and through a five-year stint as head coach at Arkansas. Since 2007 at USF, he has maintained his commitment to the style, teaching his players to resist another team’s tendency to quicken the game’s pace.“One thing that Louisville wants to do is to try to speed you up and get you to play a lot quicker and a lot faster than normally play,” Heath said in the Big East coaches teleconference before a Jan. 12 loss to Louisville. “We’ve got to make sure we do a good job of playing quick but not being in a hurry.”The Cardinals managed to force the Bulls into quick releases and USF shot a dismal 26.7 percent in the 64-38 loss.Heath’s coaching style usually translates to defensive success. USF led the Big East with 56.9 points allowed per game last season on its way to a respectable 22-win season.The Bulls’ scoring defense has faltered slightly this season, allowing 61.6 points per game. Still, Heath’s team managed to hold two of the conference’s highest-scoring teams, Syracuse and Louisville, to 55 and 64 points, respectively, this season. Its ugly style of defense and ball control is largely responsible for that.Where Heath’s team has struggled, though, is in its own ability to score.USF shoots more infrequently than most teams because of how long it holds the ball, and inconsistent shooting, turnovers and a lack of rebounding have limited South Florida’s opportunities even more. The struggles against Louisville were no aberration – USF ranks at the bottom of the Big East in scoring offense, averaging only 52.6 points per game.The Bulls simply haven’t been able to pull ahead early in the game, which limits their opportunities to control the pace.“They’re a dangerous team when you get behind them,” Villanova head coach Jay Wright said after a Jan. 9 win against USF. “Once you get behind them, it’s almost impossible.”Big East teams have been able to rack up early leads in games against the Bulls. With its measured, clock-consuming game plan, South Florida has difficulty keeping up once it falls behind. The Bulls are usually incapable of scoring in the spurts necessary to come back in Big East competition.Heath’s coaching style likely won’t set any trends in 2013. It’s a traditional, gritty approach to basketball, one that can either infuriate or elate the Bulls’ opponents, depending on how USF shoots that particular day.On Saturday, the Bulls overcame poor shooting early to come back from an eight-point halftime deficit to beat Georgetown 61-58. The game, which featured a gritty USF defensive stand, defined why Heath’s coaching style could still work.“I don’t care if we shot one percent,” Heath said with a laugh in a postgame press conference Saturday. “We won, that’s all that matters.” Comments Published on January 23, 2013 at 12:02 am Contact Jacob: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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