Compassion drives northern New England Episcopalians into the public square

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI January 24, 2017 at 5:41 pm It was wonderful to read this article and your plans to get active in policy change for Maine’s people. I have done this before on others behalf. It is one of the most important things we can do to help others. Because I had been affected by the policy in place, I did not want others to suffer like I had. I did make a difference with my bringing the issue to my local legislator. She went with me to Augusta and I read a letter I had written. It was extremely powerful for me. I hope you take witnesses to share their own experiences of being poor, hungry or opreseed etc. They need to be there with you in with their own voices. This adds passion that you cannot get across to the legislation with just a speech. The legislators need to go see the poverty and hunger. They won’t and don’t. Bring it to them with people, pictures and other types of visuals. I hope I have helped with my little expounding! As you can tell, I am still charged from my visit to Augusta and that was 20 years ago!!! Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Heidi ShottPosted Dec 14, 2016 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Deborah J. Ripley says: Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (1) Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Advocacy Peace & Justice Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tags Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Hampshire Bishop Robert Hirschfeld and the Rev. Calvin Sanborn of Maine share their perspectives on the theological basis for advocacy in the public sphere and what that might look like at the both the diocesan and parish level. Photo: Heidi Shott[Episcopal News Service] Since the first days of his episcopate in 2008, Diocese of Maine Bishop Stephen Lane hasn’t shied away from raising a prophetic voice in the public square. As a church leader, he has spoken publicly in newspapers and at the state legislature in support of marriage equality, common sense gun laws, state budgets that ensure protections for vulnerable families, and against hate speech and intolerance.In late 2014, however, questions like, “How do we engage Episcopalians in our congregations to get involved in advocacy?” and “How do we determine which issues to direct our focus?” led Diocesan Council to create a Public Policy Steering Group. Among the members invited to serve was John Hennessy, a parishioner at St. Luke’s Cathedral in Portland. Hennessy spent 20 years at the State House in Augusta as a lobbyist for progressive causes, and had recently returned to private consulting after five years as the policy director for Maine AARP.During its first and only conference call, members of the steering group decided to create a statewide network modeled on the Church’s Episcopal Public Policy Network to teach Maine Episcopalians how to advocate with local, state and national policymakers about gospel issues of poverty, homelessness, hunger, and justice for the incarcerated, immigrants and all those at the margins.Although a statewide public policy network resonated, volunteer members of the steering group and diocesan staff were already stretched too thin to make it happen. Then a chance call to the Rev. Chuck Wynder, the Episcopal Church’s officer for social justice and advocacy engagement, made all the difference. A grant program to support statewide public policy networks was included in the 2013-15 triennial budget. Since funds were still available, Wynder encouraged Hennessy to write a grant application. Suddenly, the creation of the Maine Episcopal Network for Justice seemed more like a reality.By November 2015, with assurances of a one-year grant of $30,000 and an $8,000 commitment from the Diocese of Maine, it hired Hennessy as the network’s part-time director.“Maine has developed an innovative approach for advocacy and engagement and demonstrated a collaborative spirit that can serve as a replicable model for dioceses in other states,” said Wynder. “As The Episcopal Church works to enhance our network of Episcopal statewide public policy networks, I look forward to drawing on their successes and lessons learned.”“MENJ was created, in part, to address the growing interest of people across the diocese to actively and meaningfully engage in the public square. One of the many benefits of reaching out to people is helping them realize they are not alone,” said Hennessy. “Helping connect people who share a similar point of view on an issue has been very exciting. Conversely, hosting discussions with people who approach their position from differing places and can maintain civil discourse has been very rewarding too.”Over the last year, Hennessy has visited more than a dozen Maine congregations, hosted an over-subscribed training session at St. Luke’s Cathedral, conducted workshops at diocesan training events, advocated with legislators in Augusta, and supported the work of two statewide referendums: one to raise the minimum wage for Maine workers, which passed in November; and one to close background-check loopholes in gun laws, which did not.MENJ also partnered with the diocesan Compensation Committee to develop a resolution that passed at Maine’s Convention in October to raise the minimum wage for lay employees, including church child care workers, to $12 an hour in 2017. The intent is to continue to raise the minimum each year until it reaches the Living Wage standard of $15 an hour in 2020.“We’re excited about several upcoming events in the coming year,” said Hennessy. “We will join with interfaith, ecumenical, and community partners to host a two-day Advocacy Days session in March. The first day we will offer training and the second participants will visit the State House to meet with their legislators. Because we have several congregations with groups of young people interested in social justice issues, we will do church-based training for them this winter so they will only miss one day of school.” A plan to take a group of young people to Washington, D.C. to meet with members of Maine’s congressional delegation is also in the works.Hennessy made clear that Maine Episcopalians never envisioned doing this work alone. Because the dioceses of northern England share many common concerns, Lane tested the interest of the bishops of New Hampshire, Vermont, and the New England Lutheran Synod about becoming partners. The response was enthusiastic by both bishops and their staffs.New Hampshire’s new Missioner for Community Engagement Laura Simoes signed on from the start, “Advocacy work, done by our parishes, has the power to change laws, change minds, and change us as individuals. The Episcopal Church of New Hampshire has energy and vitality. We are now growing our agency and gaining experience, to influence policy for the benefit of our communities. We welcome the chance to share in this work with our friends in Maine.”On Dec. 3, Bishop Robert Hirschfeld of New Hampshire and the Rev. Calvin Sanborn, rector of St. George’s, York Harbor, Maine, gathered with about 50 other Episcopalians at St. Thomas’, Dover, New Hampshire, to discuss the theological basis for advocacy in the public square. “Advocacy: Speaking Our Faith” was the first training co-hosted by MENJ and the Diocese of New Hampshire. (Click here for videos from “Advocacy: Speaking Our Faith.”)Hirschfeld recounted the passage in Matthew where Jesus feeds the multitudes: “Jesus says he has compassion for the crowds. The Greek word is splagchnizomai, the same word from which we get the word spleen. Jesus feels compassion in his guts. It is an incarnate word; it moves one physically. It’s not an intellectual exercise. Compassion is something we experience suddenly when we recognize we have gone to the deepest level of humanity with somebody who is in need, somebody who is not like us. It’s out of that abundant compassion that Jesus is impelled to act, that we are impelled to act.“We believe this church is not just a town meeting with hymns…but that we are actually the Body of Christ, and that we are God’s hands and feet in the world.”With the first joint training session concluded, Hennessy expressed confidence that the concept of faith-rooted organizing and advocacy will spread across the church. “Our first event in New Hampshire demonstrated we can use a shared approach to discussing the role of advocacy in the church which is rooted firmly in theological doctrines across a spectrum of issues. We look forward to including our friends in Vermont in the months ahead and will work with the Office of Social Justice on a conference for all Episcopalians in Province 1 to be held later this spring.”Lane also expressed his confidence in the network as an exemplar to the wider church. “We believe this model offers the possibility of renewed participation by Episcopalians in the public square and enhances our relationships with other Christians as we seek to ‘seek and serve Christ in every person, loving our neighbors and ourselves’” he said.“It’s work not only to change the world, but work that can change us, breaking open our hearts and inviting us into the compassion of Jesus.”– Heidi Shott is canon for communication and advocacy for the Episcopal Diocese of Maine. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Compassion drives northern New England Episcopalians into the public square Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

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Wringing every last penny out of a collecting box

first_img  54 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Old charity collecting boxes don’t die, they just go on sale on eBay.An old RNIB Sooty Collecting box has been sold on online auction site eBay.co.uk. It went for £16.50. Not a huge sum of course, but it does demonstrate that charities could make their old collecting boxes generate one last donation. In this case the interest was not so much in the charity as the children’s character: the purchaser was a collector of Sooty and Sweep material. Advertisement Tagged with: Community fundraising Digital Giving/Philanthropy Recruitment / people Trading Wringing every last penny out of a collecting boxcenter_img Of course, selling collecting boxes with charity logos on to the highest bidder could be a fraudster’s dream. So perhaps this income stream is only relevant for the truly old or collectable collecting tins or devices. Still, izzy, whizzy, let’s get busy turning those old collecting tins into cash.Presumably someone somewhere collects collecting tins? If so, do let UK Fundraising know. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 17 August 2003 | Newslast_img read more

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Support for Funding Advice Network

first_imgThere will now be a feasibility study with over 42 networks expected to take part as well as a wide range of third sector organisations.The survey is avialable on fit4funding’s website. Support for Funding Advice Network AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The Finance Hub has commissioned a national partnership to carry out a feasibility study into setting up a Funding Advice National Network (FANN) in England. The partnership is led by fit4funding and includes Funding Information North East, South Yorkshire Funding Advice Bureau, Wiltshire CIB, NAVCA and the Institute of Fundraising.The case for a national network to support advisers came via a report by Sheffield Hallam University in 2006 for the Finance Hub. Research found a substantial level of activity through Funding Advisers Networks (FANs) across England. Most respondents were in favour of creating a national network. Advertisement  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 10 September 2007 | Newslast_img read more

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Concern about health of detained writer who has been on hunger strike for 28 days

first_img ChinaAsia – Pacific China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison ChinaAsia – Pacific Reporters Without Borders is worried about the health of detained cyber-dissident and human rights activist Yang Maodong (also known by the pseudonym of Guo Feixiong), who had been on hunger strike since 13 December.“Yang must be freed,” the press freedom organisation said. “His prison conditions are unacceptable and we reiterate our call for the release of detained journalists and cyber-dissidents before the Beijing Olympic Games. His state of health is disturbing and the way the authorities are hounding his family is outrageous. This is the second hunger strike he has staged in the past year.”Yang’s wife, Zhang Qing, wrote to the US president on 9 January asking him to raise her husband plight during his next meeting with Chinese leader Hu Jintao.After being allowed to visit Yang on 28 December, Zhang said: “He seemed a lot less well than before his transfer on 12 December. He has lost weight, he is pale, and he is determined to continue his hunger strike for 100 days.” Yang was beaten up by one of his fellow inmates on 18 December, five days after he was transferred to Meizhou prison in the eastern province of Guangdong.A writer and staunch human rights activist, Yang, 41, was arrested for “disturbing the peace” after organising a rally in the village of Taishi on 13 September 2006. The authorities claimed that he “personally led demonstrations by villagers with the aim of overthrowing the local officials.” He was sentenced in November 2007 to five years in prison and a fine of 40,000 yuan (4,000 euros). In order to begin collecting this sum, the authorities froze the couple’s bank account on 18 December and withdrew 7,260 yuan.More on this case Receive email alerts January 11, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Concern about health of detained writer who has been on hunger strike for 28 days News Organisation Help by sharing this information News China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figurescenter_img March 12, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on China News RSF_en June 2, 2021 Find out more April 27, 2021 Find out more to go further Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimeslast_img read more

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Police probe Derry shooting incident

first_img Google+ Homepage BannerNews Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Police probe Derry shooting incident Pinterest Facebook Facebook Google+ Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Twitter Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firecenter_img Pinterest Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By admin – April 30, 2015 WhatsApp Twitter Shots have been fired at a parked car in the Shantallow area of Derry.It happened in Drumleck Gardens shortly after midnight.No injuries have been reported, police are investigating. 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Previous articleHarkin claims government is “intimidating” LEADER groupsNext articleGAA Programme catch up – 29/04/15 admin last_img read more

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Troy students host special hunt

first_imgLatest Stories Sponsored Content Troy students host special hunt The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Published 3:00 am Thursday, March 24, 2016 Toni Branson, pre-school teacher, said the children look forward to the Easter egg hunt each year and this year’s hunt was even more exciting.“In the past, the Easter egg hunt has been on the school grounds,” she said. “But having in here at Murphree Park has been a special treat. The Troy University students have done an outstanding job planning and preparing for the Easter egg hunt and the children love being at the park.” Branson said the having the university students in the classroom is a huge benefit for pre-schoolers.“Not only do the university students work with the children on motor development, they also incorporate academics into the program,” Branson said. By The Penny Hoarder Email the author Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits “They include counting games and games that teach shapes and colors. The children always look forward to ‘Miss Candi and the kids’ coming.”And “Miss Candi’s kids” look forward to their time at the ECC. “Being involved with the little kids reassures me in my career choice,” said Carly Parrish of Hoover. “I believe we are making a positive difference in the lives of these kids. The hugs and smiles make it all worthwhile. And, being here doing this. Wow! It warms your heart.”Bradley Crenshaw from Ariton was looking for a new direction in his life and took a turn toward physical education. “I’ll be qualified to teach K-12 but my preference will be the upper grades,” he said.“I’ve been surprised how much I have enjoyed working with this age group. It’s been a real learning experience working with them on specific skills to improve their motor develop. We’ve all benefited from this class.”center_img Print Article Students in the motor development class at Troy University hosted an Easter Egg hunt for three preschool classes and a self-contained special education class from Troy Elementary School on Wednesday. Dozens of children hunted hundreds of eggs at Murphree Park as part of the outing and activities. The Troy students partner to provide assistance to the elementary school.The Easter Bunny himself could not have provided more fun and excitement for 36 youngsters from the Hank Jones Early Childhood Center than Dr. Candice Shaughnessy’s Motor Development class at Troy University provided Wednesday.Shaughnessy’s students planned and supervised an Easter egg hunt for three pre-school classes and a self-contained special education class at Murphree Park. The university students are pursuing careers in heath education, physical education and human services. As a part of the motor development class in the Department of Kinesiology & Health Promotion, the students conduct a perceptual motor program at the ECC three days a week. They plan and organize events for the students, including the Easter egg hunt.Fifteen university students participated in the egg hunt by hiding 468 eggs for the children to hunt and find. Following the egg hunt, the students enjoyed a picnic lunch at the park. Open house for the Hank Jones Early Childhood Center is Sunday, April 10.Preschool Open house is from 4-5:30 p.m. and kindergarten is from 2-3:30 p.m. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration By Jaine Treadwell You Might Like Rock bids: Historic Pike Activities Building draws only one bidder The Pike County Commission sought sealed bids for the possible sale of the Rock Building in downtown Troy. The abandoned… read more Book Nook to reopen Troy falls to No. 13 Clemsonlast_img read more

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Cubs Blank Bees

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail(Des Moines, IA)  —  The Bees managed just two hits in a 6-0 loss to the I-Cubs in Des Moines.Griffin Canning got chased in the fifth inning to take the loss.The Bees fell to 57-and-52.  The series continues in Des Moines tonight. August 2, 2018 /Sports News – Local Cubs Blank Bees Tags: Baseball/PCL/Salt Lake Bees Written by Robert Lovelllast_img

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REPUBLISHED EDITORIAL: WITHDRAW THE DECISION TO FIRE DIRECTOR OF BURETTE PARK

first_imgEDITORIAL: COMMISSIONERS SHOULD WITHDRAW THE DECISION TO FIRE DIRECTOR OF BURETTE PARKCommissioner Shoulders Should Had Recused Himself From Vote Because of Conflict Of InterestThis week we posted many comments concerning the misguided decision to fire the hardworking and qualified Director of Burdette Park.County Commissioner Ben Shoulders (D) appeared to have cut a backroom deal in order to repay his campaign manager for a job well done.  We consider this to be an act of political patronage at its best. During the campaign, Mr. Shoulders pledged that if elected he would be extremely objective and transparent. The voters signed off on his campaign pledge and elected him to the District 1 County Commissioner seat. We’re disappointed to report that it didn’t take to long for Mr. Shoulders to break his campaign pledge to the people of this community to be open and transparent.District 3 County Commissioner Cheryl Musgrave’s participation in the firing of the qualified and hard working 28 year old Burdette Parks Director took many by surprise. We consider her decision to support Mr. Shoulders desire to fire Burdette Park Director Jacob Murphy was without cause.   Also many people feel that the hiring of Ben Shoulders campaign manager to replace Mr. Murphy was an unacceptable act of “political patronage.”   For what we are hearing this may have caused her some serious political problems with the general public in the future.What’s disappointing is that the decision to fire Mr. Murphy was done in private.  Commissioner’s Shoulders and Musgrave never took the time to discuss this matter with all the members of the Burdette Park Advisory Board in order to get their input concerning Mr. Murphy’s overall job performance. They never directly discussed their desire to terminate Mr. Murphy employment with all members of the Vanderburgh County Council.  They didn’t alert the media or the public about the firing of Jacob Murphy and the hiring of Pat Tuley and his wife until after the fact.   Most importantly they didn’t  put this issue on the official County Commission agenda for public discussion.Pat and Z Tuley have served in different elected and appointed position for many years. Both have serve well in the public sector during the last 25 years. Both have received handsome compersations for the work they did for the taxpayers of Vanderburgh County. However, it looks like it may be time for them to find employment elsewhere other than Burdette Park.  With their political and business connections we expect that they will have little trouble doing so.We hope that Commissioners Ben Shoulders and Cheryl Musgrave will not only publicly apology to the taxpayers of Vanderburgh County for their bad misjudgment in this matter but they should also rescind the firing of 28 years old Jacob Murphy as the Burdette Parks Director because it’s the right thing to do.Its time to put this situation behind us and focus on the important issues that will help our county to become even more progressive in the future!FOOTNOTE: Todays “Readers Poll”  question is: Should County Commissioners Shoulders and Musgrave withdraw their decision to fire the Director of Burdette Park?FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Mr. Mature America Pageant Seeks Contestants

first_imgMr. Mature America 2019 Jack Merritt, crowned by 2018 title holder Bill Quain, is rescheduled for September. (Photo courtesy City of Ocean City) Entries are open for contestants in the Mr. Mature America Pageant on April 18.Mr. Mature celebrates the achievements of men 55 years and older. The pageant, now in its seventh year, mixes talent, good looks and self-deprecating humor.The Ocean City Music Pier crowd is raucous and appreciative as the contestants ham it up on stage, competing in talent, poise and interview segments.All Mr. Mature America contestants are expected to pick a community service cause or nonprofit organization they would represent as Mr. Mature America.A people’s choice program will be implemented in which contestants can collect donations through a voting board in front of the Ocean City Music Pier from April 1 to April 18. A portion of the proceeds will go towards Mr. Mature America 2020’s service cause. The new people’s choice competition will make up 5 percent of the overall score.If you have what it takes to be the world’s next “Mr. Mature” (or if you can talk somebody into it), complete the online entry form available at www.ocnj.us/mrmature or call Michael Hartman at 609-525-9284 for more information. Deadline for sign-ups is March 15.“Brady Bunch” star Barry Williams, now 65, serves as host for this year’s Mr. Mature America Pageant. (Photo courtesy of Distractify.com)The event is the first and only pageant of its kind in the United States. Barry Williams, who starred as America’s most reliable big brother in the 1970s sitcom “The Brady Bunch,” will be host of this year’s show. The historic Flanders Hotel returns as a founding sponsor this year.Tickets for the show ($25 to $30) are on sale now and available at oceancityvacation.com/boxoffice, by calling 609-399-6111, or in-person at the City Hall Welcome Center or the Roy Gillian Welcome Center on the Route 52 causeway.The Mr. Mature Pageant takes place on the evening of the Doo Dah Parade on April 18 to cap off a day filled with humor and nostalgia. Registration also is open for any individuals, groups or businesses who want to participate in the Doo Dah Parade at noon that day. Joining the parade is a great way to bring awareness to your business or cause before the summer season. Sign up at www.ocnj.us/Doo-Dah-Parade.The Doo Dah Parade was first held in Ocean City in 1986 as an event to herald the end of income tax season. It featured unusual entries like beach chair drill teams and fan clubs of legendary comedians.The parade begins on Asbury Avenue at Sixth Street, proceeds to 12th Street and turns east to the Boardwalk. It finishes on the Boardwalk at Sixth Street. For more than a decade, the parade has been anchored by a legion of dogs from the Basset Hound Rescue League.last_img read more

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UPDATE: Missing Elkhart woman has been found

first_img By Tommie Lee – June 10, 2020 0 1238 UPDATE: Missing Elkhart woman has been found Twitter Google+ UPDATE: Alexis Lopez has been found, according to Elkhart City Police.ORIGINAL STORY: Police in Elkhart are looking for a missing 21 year-old woman.The EPD says 21 year-old Alexis Lopez has brown hair and eyes, and is about 5 feet tall and 135 pounds.She was last seen June 6 in the area of 600 West Boulevard in Elkhart. Alexis was wearing a white shirt, gray shorts, blue knee-high socks, red and black shoes and a black fanny pack.Her family says she has a possible medical issue and they are concerned for her welfare. WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Google+ Facebook WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Previous articleNew sentence for convicted kidnapperNext articleIndiana in Phase Four of Back On Track plan Tommie Leelast_img read more

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