Cubs Blank Bees

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail(Des Moines, IA)  —  The Bees managed just two hits in a 6-0 loss to the I-Cubs in Des Moines.Griffin Canning got chased in the fifth inning to take the loss.The Bees fell to 57-and-52.  The series continues in Des Moines tonight. August 2, 2018 /Sports News – Local Cubs Blank Bees Tags: Baseball/PCL/Salt Lake Bees Written by Robert Lovelllast_img

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REPUBLISHED EDITORIAL: WITHDRAW THE DECISION TO FIRE DIRECTOR OF BURETTE PARK

first_imgEDITORIAL: COMMISSIONERS SHOULD WITHDRAW THE DECISION TO FIRE DIRECTOR OF BURETTE PARKCommissioner Shoulders Should Had Recused Himself From Vote Because of Conflict Of InterestThis week we posted many comments concerning the misguided decision to fire the hardworking and qualified Director of Burdette Park.County Commissioner Ben Shoulders (D) appeared to have cut a backroom deal in order to repay his campaign manager for a job well done.  We consider this to be an act of political patronage at its best. During the campaign, Mr. Shoulders pledged that if elected he would be extremely objective and transparent. The voters signed off on his campaign pledge and elected him to the District 1 County Commissioner seat. We’re disappointed to report that it didn’t take to long for Mr. Shoulders to break his campaign pledge to the people of this community to be open and transparent.District 3 County Commissioner Cheryl Musgrave’s participation in the firing of the qualified and hard working 28 year old Burdette Parks Director took many by surprise. We consider her decision to support Mr. Shoulders desire to fire Burdette Park Director Jacob Murphy was without cause.   Also many people feel that the hiring of Ben Shoulders campaign manager to replace Mr. Murphy was an unacceptable act of “political patronage.”   For what we are hearing this may have caused her some serious political problems with the general public in the future.What’s disappointing is that the decision to fire Mr. Murphy was done in private.  Commissioner’s Shoulders and Musgrave never took the time to discuss this matter with all the members of the Burdette Park Advisory Board in order to get their input concerning Mr. Murphy’s overall job performance. They never directly discussed their desire to terminate Mr. Murphy employment with all members of the Vanderburgh County Council.  They didn’t alert the media or the public about the firing of Jacob Murphy and the hiring of Pat Tuley and his wife until after the fact.   Most importantly they didn’t  put this issue on the official County Commission agenda for public discussion.Pat and Z Tuley have served in different elected and appointed position for many years. Both have serve well in the public sector during the last 25 years. Both have received handsome compersations for the work they did for the taxpayers of Vanderburgh County. However, it looks like it may be time for them to find employment elsewhere other than Burdette Park.  With their political and business connections we expect that they will have little trouble doing so.We hope that Commissioners Ben Shoulders and Cheryl Musgrave will not only publicly apology to the taxpayers of Vanderburgh County for their bad misjudgment in this matter but they should also rescind the firing of 28 years old Jacob Murphy as the Burdette Parks Director because it’s the right thing to do.Its time to put this situation behind us and focus on the important issues that will help our county to become even more progressive in the future!FOOTNOTE: Todays “Readers Poll”  question is: Should County Commissioners Shoulders and Musgrave withdraw their decision to fire the Director of Burdette Park?FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Mr. Mature America Pageant Seeks Contestants

first_imgMr. Mature America 2019 Jack Merritt, crowned by 2018 title holder Bill Quain, is rescheduled for September. (Photo courtesy City of Ocean City) Entries are open for contestants in the Mr. Mature America Pageant on April 18.Mr. Mature celebrates the achievements of men 55 years and older. The pageant, now in its seventh year, mixes talent, good looks and self-deprecating humor.The Ocean City Music Pier crowd is raucous and appreciative as the contestants ham it up on stage, competing in talent, poise and interview segments.All Mr. Mature America contestants are expected to pick a community service cause or nonprofit organization they would represent as Mr. Mature America.A people’s choice program will be implemented in which contestants can collect donations through a voting board in front of the Ocean City Music Pier from April 1 to April 18. A portion of the proceeds will go towards Mr. Mature America 2020’s service cause. The new people’s choice competition will make up 5 percent of the overall score.If you have what it takes to be the world’s next “Mr. Mature” (or if you can talk somebody into it), complete the online entry form available at www.ocnj.us/mrmature or call Michael Hartman at 609-525-9284 for more information. Deadline for sign-ups is March 15.“Brady Bunch” star Barry Williams, now 65, serves as host for this year’s Mr. Mature America Pageant. (Photo courtesy of Distractify.com)The event is the first and only pageant of its kind in the United States. Barry Williams, who starred as America’s most reliable big brother in the 1970s sitcom “The Brady Bunch,” will be host of this year’s show. The historic Flanders Hotel returns as a founding sponsor this year.Tickets for the show ($25 to $30) are on sale now and available at oceancityvacation.com/boxoffice, by calling 609-399-6111, or in-person at the City Hall Welcome Center or the Roy Gillian Welcome Center on the Route 52 causeway.The Mr. Mature Pageant takes place on the evening of the Doo Dah Parade on April 18 to cap off a day filled with humor and nostalgia. Registration also is open for any individuals, groups or businesses who want to participate in the Doo Dah Parade at noon that day. Joining the parade is a great way to bring awareness to your business or cause before the summer season. Sign up at www.ocnj.us/Doo-Dah-Parade.The Doo Dah Parade was first held in Ocean City in 1986 as an event to herald the end of income tax season. It featured unusual entries like beach chair drill teams and fan clubs of legendary comedians.The parade begins on Asbury Avenue at Sixth Street, proceeds to 12th Street and turns east to the Boardwalk. It finishes on the Boardwalk at Sixth Street. For more than a decade, the parade has been anchored by a legion of dogs from the Basset Hound Rescue League.last_img read more

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UPDATE: Missing Elkhart woman has been found

first_img By Tommie Lee – June 10, 2020 0 1238 UPDATE: Missing Elkhart woman has been found Twitter Google+ UPDATE: Alexis Lopez has been found, according to Elkhart City Police.ORIGINAL STORY: Police in Elkhart are looking for a missing 21 year-old woman.The EPD says 21 year-old Alexis Lopez has brown hair and eyes, and is about 5 feet tall and 135 pounds.She was last seen June 6 in the area of 600 West Boulevard in Elkhart. Alexis was wearing a white shirt, gray shorts, blue knee-high socks, red and black shoes and a black fanny pack.Her family says she has a possible medical issue and they are concerned for her welfare. WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Google+ Facebook WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Previous articleNew sentence for convicted kidnapperNext articleIndiana in Phase Four of Back On Track plan Tommie Leelast_img read more

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Spiritual weeding

first_img 14After picking and delivering vegetables from the Harvard Divinity School garden, Robin Lutjohann tacks up a menu outside Faith Kitchen at Faith Lutheran Church. 11Bean plants and sunflowers frame Harvard Divinity School students Jim Robinson (left) and Seanan Fong. 10Sunflowers add color to an already vibrant place. 7Green beans grow in the Harvard Divinity School Garden located behind the Dean’s House. 5In the shed, Lily Oster keeps seed records. 9First-year Harvard Divinity School student Mitul Daiyan collects arugula in her shawl. 6Last year’s garlic bulbs are stored and dried. 12Au naturel! Jim Robinson lets his bare feet out in the Harvard Divinity School garden. Also pictured is Jennifer Wenz. Tucked away along a row of trees behind Harvard Divinity School (HDS) Dean David Hempton’s house, the HDS garden came to flourish in 2009. The brainchild of EcoDiv, a green-minded HDS student group, and the Green Team, made up of HDS staffers, the garden took shape with a grant from the Office for Sustainability.With the help of Leslie MacPherson Artinian, a department administrator at HDS and the garden’s staff liaison, student Lily Oster recently took charge of the garden’s operations. Together with a group of HDS students, they follow the work ethic that “weeding is a form of spirituality,” and hold this in mind while performing the dirty work the garden requires — planting, composting, watering, and, yes, weeding.Each week some of the harvested vegetables are artistically plated by MacPherson Artinian and set out at community tea, a weekly social hour held in the Braun Room at HDS. And every other week, student Robin Lutjohann pedals vegetables by bike from the garden to Cambridge’s Faith Kitchen, where he prepares a hearty and healthy meal for the homeless.— Photographs and text by Rose Lincolncenter_img 8Harvard Divinity School student Hillary Collins-Gilpatrick lends a hand harvesting cherry tomatoes. 2Lily Oster found other Divinity School garden helpers through email and by word of mouth. 4Harvard Divinity School student Lily Oster laid out the garden plan on paper before any planting began. 1Harvard Divinity School student and garden intern Lily Oster worked hard this summer but the job wasn’t without its sweet rewards. 13Leslie MacPherson Artinian, a department administrator in the Office of Ministry Studies, delivers a vegetable platter to the weekly HDS community tea. 15The church and Faith Kitchen are on Broadway in Cambridge. Robin Lutjohann, also a vicar at the church, helps prepare and serve free meals to the guests using bounty from the Harvard Divinity School garden. 3Lily Oster, Harvard Divinity School student, carefully straddles the boards of a raised bed to give the garden a cool drink of water.last_img read more

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Aldatu Biosciences wins Deans’ Health and Sciences Challenge

first_img Read Full Story In this year’s Deans’ Health and Life Sciences Challenge, Aldatu Biosciences, a venture created by Harvard students and researchers, took home the Bertarelli Foundation Grand Prize and $40,000 in award money.Sponsored by deans from across the university and hosted at the Harvard innovation lab (i-lab), the challenge called for undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral and clinical fellows from across Harvard’s Schools to identify technologies that can be realized as implementable solutions to transform quality of care and life for populations around the world.“This challenge is a small measure of us trying to see if we can catalyze this university and all of its amazing resources to come together and find answers to the many challenges that lie in this field,” said Nitin Nohria, dean of the Harvard Business School (HBS) and co-chair of the challenge. “The forty-two entries of this challenge demonstrate that people can convert these problems into opportunities.”Aldatu Biosciences is commercializing technology that enables cost-effective, accurate, and efficient diagnosis of patients infected by drug-resistant strains of HIV.Two other student-led teams were named runners-up and were each awarded $5000 to help grow their ventures: FlowLight is creating a medical device that monitors post-surgery blood flow to improve patient care and lower personal time and cost; Disease Diagnostic Group is building a diagnostic device that can easily and accurately identify patients infected with malaria.last_img read more

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John Benjamin Hickey & More Board Dada Woof Papa Hot Off-B’way

first_img Related Shows View Comments Dada Woof Papa Hot Tony winner John Benjamin Hickey, Patrick Breen and more will star in the previously announced Dada Woof Papa Hot off-Broadway. Helmed by On the Twentieth Century’s director Scott Ellis, the new play by Peter Parnell will begin previews on October 15 and officially open on November 9 at Lincoln Center’s Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater.Joining Hickey (The Normal Heart) and Breen (The Normal Heart) in the cast will be Tammy Blanchard (How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying), Alex Hurt (Cat on a Hot Tin Roof), Kellie Overbey (On the Twentieth Century), John Pankow (Equivocation) and Stephen Plunkett (War Horse).Alan (Hickey) and Rob (Breen) are an older married couple with a three-year-old daughter and a life they fought for decades to be allowed to lead. But in the course of one school year, Alan, Rob and their friends struggle with what it means to be married with children at this head-spinning cultural moment. By turns comic and serious, Dada Woof Papa Hot asks the question: are the challenges of gay dads the same as those of straight ones, or is there something fundamentally different about being a gay parent?The production will feature sets by John Lee Beatty, costumes by Jennifer von Mayrhauser, lighting by Peter Kaczorowski, and original music and sound by John Gromada. Star Files John Benjamin Hickey Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 3, 2016last_img read more

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Audra McDonald Talks Us Through All Her Exciting Projects

first_imgAudra McDonald: Broadway royalty, film star, humanitarian. The six-time Tony winner recently spoke with Broadway.com about sharing the stage with her husband Will Swenson in A Moon for the Misbegotten at Williamstown Theatre Festival, but that’s just one of a multitude of projects she’s currently got in the works. Her latest film, Ricki and the Flash, premieres this week; she recently reprised her Tony-winning turn as Billie Holiday for HBO’s upcoming Lady Day; the list goes on. Take a look below as Mama Broadway herself sounds off on some of her exciting ventures.On joining the Covenant House Board of Directors“I’m so moved by the work I’ve seen, and now I have seen it first hand. I’ve met a lot of the kids and spent time with them. And the people who run the Covenant Houses—those are the true angels. Believe me, I’m getting much more out of it than they’re getting from me. I’m the one who has changed.”Contribute to McDonald’s fundraising efforts for the Covenant House’s Sleep Out: Broadway Edition here. Incentives include joining her for hot chocolate and TV theme song covers with Swenson.On those The Wiz Live! casting rumors“What did Abraham Lincoln say? Don’t believe everything you read on the internet?”NBC’s live telecast, featuring Queen Latifah, Mary J. Blige and Stephanie Mills, will air on December 3. Nothing regarding McDonald’s involvement is confirmed, though that’s not stopping us from imagining her “A Rested Body Is A Rested Mind.” On working with George C. Wolfe on Shuffle Along…“It’s exciting to be working with him for the first time ever, which seems weird since we’ve known each other for as long as we have. But more than that, I’m excited to be working on a new musical. I love the evolution and creativity that goes into it.”Shuffle Along, Or, The Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed will begin performances on March 14, 2016 at the Music Box Theatre. The show tracks the history of the 1921 musical Shuffle Along, which defied expectations and ran for 504 performances.On filming Beauty and the Beast“Bill Condon is creating something quite beautiful. It’s a pretty stellar cast. It was like Disney dreams come true.”And on what she’ll look like as the Wardrobe“I am not at liberty to say! But it’s cool. I can say that. It’s really, really cool.”The live action adaptation is set to premiere on March 17, 2017. In addition to McDonald as Garderobe, the cast includes Emma Watson as Belle, Dan Stevens as the Beast and Emma Thompson as Mrs. Potts. View Commentslast_img read more

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Come for the Winter, Stay for the Summer

first_imgHow Bike Parks are Changing the Game at Ski ResortsDownhill resorts throughout the region are making major investments in bike parks, and that’s good news for skiers, bikers—and beer-drinkers.Winter is still in full swing when I arrive at Massanutten Resort in McGaheysville, Va. The snowguns blast at full-throttle, showering the parking lot in faint dustings of manmade powder.I find Bike Park & Snow Sports Rental Manager Jonathan Albert and Lead Bike Park Supervisor and Bike/Ski Patroller Scott Wooten in the rental shop. It’s surprisingly busy for a Tuesday morning, so we make our way to an empty table in the lodge overlooking the slopes.“Last Saturday was our busiest day this season,” says Albert. “Business is good.”Good, but not great. Record cold spells this past winter allowed many resorts in the region to run the guns earlier and build their base quicker, but there’s no denying that the ski season these days just isn’t what it used to be.According to the 2016-2017 National Ski Areas Association End of Season Report, resorts in every region except the Rocky Mountains are witnessing decreasing or plateauing numbers of skiers and snowboarders. Even the powder Shangri La that is the Pacific West saw erratic resort attendance, which directly coincides with fickle winters.Photo: Sean LeaderIt’s in part due to that unpredictability that, in July of 2016, Massanutten joined the budding ranks of Southeastern ski resorts offering lift-access biking in the summer. Unlike many resorts, which turn to ghost towns in the off-season, Massanutten is different in that it has a timeshare member base. Prior to 2016, summer business wasn’t dead by any means, but it wasn’t thriving either.Members could swim at the water park, play mini golf, or swing around in the Bungee Dome, but all of that seemed a little kitschy in the shadow of a perfectly aesthetic mountain. For decades the resort had already been building its status as a mountain bike destination—their signature downhill YEE-HAW! and cross-country HOO-HA! races were started 20 and 30 years ago respectively. The resort also maintains a unique partnership with the Shenandoah Valley Bicycle Coalition, which manages the resort’s 30-mile Western Slope trail system. Still, those trails are notoriously rooty, rocky, and technical. Hardly the type of trail an inexperienced timeshare owner would want to ride.In 2013, Massanutten got the nudge it needed when nearby Bryce Resort, also a timeshare resort, opened up its own bike park. Seeing their neighbor’s success was just the impetus Albert and Wooten needed to push a bike park agenda forward.Photo: Sean Leader“We already had the heads and beds,” says Wooten. “The people were already here. We call that low-hanging fruit. A huge majority of our summer clients have been coming for one week every summer for 20 years. If they get exposed to mountain biking one year, we can expect them to come back and bring friends and build that momentum and resort clientele.”That momentum has been fast and furious for Massanutten, which will open later this month for its third season. With the addition of the bike park came 30 new full- and part-time jobs. Summer weekends are always busy with lessons and clinics and races. And though the greater Shenandoah Valley cycling community has the reputation of being rock garden evangelists, the Massanutten Bike Park prides itself on offering plenty of beginner trails to complement the quality singletrack both on the Western Slope and in the adjoining George Washington and Jefferson National Forests.“What is special about a bike park is it lowers that barrier of entry into the sport to show that it’s something everybody can do,” says Wooten. “Mountain biking is not a friendly sport to get into. You have to be willing to dedicate your money and energy to getting good. It can be very unapproachable. But a bike park shows it’s not just for doctors and fitness freaks. It’s for anybody.”Beech MountainPhoto: Beech MountainPayoffs of the ParkIt’s a similar tune down at Beech Mountain Resort in Beech Mountain, N.C. In the early 2000s, the resort hosted a number of National Off-Road Bicycle Association (or NORBA, the predecessor to USA Cycling) races. Then again, in 2011 and 2012, it served as the venue for the USA Cycling Mountain Bike Gravity National Championships.But when the resort went to open up a proper bike park in 2013, it became clear that those courses were suited more for intermediate and advanced riders, not beginners.“What we were seeing is that existing infrastructure was really hurting Beech’s ability to exist as a public facility because they were so focused on being race tracks,” says Elevated Trail Design co-owner Andrew Mueller. “We made some major design changes to better accommodate a wider range of riders but also to just use more of the terrain so you can fit a maximum amount of trail experiences in a small area.”Photo: Andrew MuellerThe resulting eight-trail system is a smorgasbord of technically precise rock gardens and flowy machine-built butter. For Beech Mountain Ski Patrol Director Brad Blackwell, keeping the resort’s trails fresh isn’t just about catering to newcomers in the sport; it’s about staying relevant in an ever-changing industry.“People used to want to ride the most technical, gnarly trails, but now people don’t want to buy a $9,000 bike just so they can ride it at the bike park,” he says. “They want to buy one bike and be able to do everything on it.”“They’re the same technical trail you might ride in Pisgah, but you’re not going to pedal to the top.” – Neko MulallyThe booming bike culture here feels organic, not forced—trails designed by riders for riders, the Skybar at the top and brewery at the bottom, the High Country setting and verdant forests. On a busy weekend, with a couple hundred riders threading the mountain and car racks stacked with bikes in the parking lots, the scene could almost be plucked from a little corner of Whistler. Except it’s not British Columbia. It’s uniquely Southeastern, and it’s this, says World Cup rider Neko Mulally that makes Beech what it is.“The cool thing about most of the Southeast bike parks is they’re not just making a 10-foot wide jogging path down the mountain,” he says. “They’re the same technical trail you might ride in Pisgah, but you’re not going to pedal to the top. Beech can be pretty rocky and they do a good job of working with what the mountain has and following the natural way of the terrain. By leaving that stuff intact and not building over it or getting rid of it, you keep the character of the mountain.”Beech Mountain Trail DesignPhoto: Andrew MuellerBack in 2016, Mulally started the Downhill Southeast race series to showcase some of these venues and to give downhill competitors like himself a chance to get some races in before heading to the international stage. The four-part series takes place both at resort bike parks and shuttle bike parks. This year, Beech Mountain and Massanutten will both be venues as will Windrock Bike Park near Oliver Springs, Tenn., which Mulally and his business partner Sean Leader took over in 2016.As a competitor and event organizer, Mulally says the resort model is the unicorn of downhill race venues due in large part to the amenities that are already in place: ample flat parking, lift access, electricity at the top and bottom of the hill, hotels, restaurants. He believes resorts all throughout the Southeast have a real opportunity to tap into a market that’s not only on the rise—Sports Marketing Surveys, Inc., found that mountain biking rose in popularity by 16% between 2010 and 2015—but also a lifelong sport.“If we do a good job with these races, then people will have a good taste of that venue and will want to come back and check it out another time. It’s not just a flash in the pan. Some resorts put in a zip line or a mountain coaster, but mountain biking is much more sustainable. It’s something people get into and, it’s the same with skiing, it doesn’t get old. You want to keep riding. It’s not just a once-and-done sort of activity.”Southeast Downhill SeriesPhoto: Sean LeaderPay to PlaySo why aren’t more Southeastern resorts adopting the summertime bike park model? For starters, the initial investment is big. Like, big-big.“I’ll just say it’s in the hundreds,” says Bryce Park’s Director of Mountain Operations. “That includes everything from tools to rental bikes to staff to trail building. That’s everything, all in.”But even if the resort has deep pockets, it takes an army to make a bike park great. Philip Duncan out of Slaty Fork, W.Va., was one of the primary instigators for Snowshoe Bike Park in West Virginia. For years, Duncan worked primarily as a graphic designer and marketer for the resort, but when he started getting wind of what Whistler was up to, he knew Snowshoe had to hop on board.Fortunately for Duncan, the General Manager at the time was from Whistler and he embraced the idea with open arms. In 2004, Snowshoe became the first in the Southeast to open up a resort bike park. But even with Intrawest financially backing Duncan’s initiative, the early years were absolutely a labor of love.“Me and Dave Huber and a handful of other people were super stoked and we were the driving force,” he says. “Some summers we weren’t even riding that much because we were building trail. You have to have passion in your employees to convince the powers-that-be that this is a good thing. That’s the only way we were able to do it.”Photo: WintergreenNow that the mountain biking scene is no longer in its infancy, which it arguably still was back in the early 2000s, there are numbers to support the love. In 2017, the Outdoor Industry Association found that cyclists spend over $96 billion in gear and trip-related expenses. All of that revenue contributes to nearly 850,000 jobs and generates over $6 billion in state and local taxes.Interestingly, skiers and snowboarders nationwide only spend $73 billion annually, which creates less than 700,000 jobs and $5 billion in state and local taxes. Currently, bike park visits account for less than 3% of annual resort visits in the country, according to MTBparks.com, but with over 45 million Americans identifying as cyclists, that number has room to grow.Here in the Southeast, where a mild climate dominates two-thirds of the year, it’s not hard to envision bike parks overtaking skiing in the future. But for now, says Derek Clifton at Bryce, winter is king.“We’ve never had a bad year. We’ve doubled our bike park business almost every year since we started. It just gets bigger and bigger and bigger. It won’t ever surpass the winter season, but it is the second highest revenue maker on our mountain, and it is totally 100% worth it.”last_img read more

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September 15, 2005 News and Notes

first_imgSeptember 15, 2005 News and Notes September 15, 2005 News & Notes News and Notes David J. Akins of Dean Mead in Orlando was recently elected to the board of directors of the Central Florida Estate Planning Council. Howard D. Rosen of Donlevy-Rosen & Rosen presented “The Use of Offshore Trusts in Asset Protection Planning” at a combined program for the Nebraska, Wyoming, and South Dakota bar associations. Patricia Donlevy-Rosen presented, “Ethical Considerations in Asset Protection Planning.” Additionally, both presented a full-day program “An A to Z Guide to the Fundamentals of Asset Protection in Florida” in Miami and West Palm Beach for the National Business Institute. Howard Caplan of Jacksonville was appointed to a two-year term as a director of Florida Legal Services, Inc. Kimberly Bonder Rezanka of Dean Mead in the Melbourne office was elected president-elect of the Brevard County Bar Association for 2005-2006. Sylvia H. Walbolt and Gary L. Sasso of Carlton Fields in Tampa spoke at the 20th Annual Federal Practice & Advocacy Seminar in New Orleans. Walbolt participated in a panel concerning briefing for trial and appellate lawyers. Sasso spoke on the preservation of error in civil cases. Rafael E. Suarez-Rivas of the City of Miami Office of the City Attorney presented “Purchasing and Ethics” at the State and Local Contracting and Procurement Law Seminar in Ft. Lauderdale. Robert R. May of the Queretaro, Mexico, offices of May, Cruz Consultores has been appointed to the editorial board of the daily newspaper A.M. in Queretaro. Melanie Emmons Damian of Damian & Valori lectured at the ABA’s Annual Meeting in Chicago on “Employment Law Issues/Traps for the Unwary: The 5 Hottest Topics Facing In-House Corporate Counsel.” Martha H. Chumbler and Michael P. Donaldson of Carlton Fields in Tallahassee were speakers at the 2005 spring meeting of the ABA section of State and Local Government Law in Anchorage, Alaska. They spoke on ethical issues in government representation in a program titled “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Part II.” Kelly Overstreet Johnson of Broad and Cassel in Tallahassee was elected to the executive council of the National Conference of Bar Presidents at the annual meeting of the ABA. Lisa S. Walsh of Gonzalez & Walsh in Miami was recently installed as secretary of the Florida Association for Women Lawyers, Miami-Dade Chapter. Geralyn Passaro of Stephens, Lynn, Klein, LaCava, Hoffman & Puya in Ft. Lauderdale spoke to the Federation of Defense and Corporate Counsel at its annual meeting in San Diego on the topic “Claims of Exploitation of the Elderly in the Sale of Financial Products.” Kimberly A. Cook of Abadin Jaramillo Cook & Heffernan in Miami was recently appointed to the Kristi House Board of Directors. Joel Levine was selected as one of eight nationwide arbitrators for a special FCC/American Arbitration Association Arbitration Panel to handle retransmission consent and regional sports network cable programming disputes. Thomas A. Dye of Carlton Fields in West Palm Beach spoke at the ABA’s Annual Meeting in Chicago on the topic “Breakthroughs in Negotiation Strategy: What Every Business Litigator Needs To Know.” John W. Robinson IV of Fowler White Boggs Banker was selected to participate in the Leadership Florida 2005-2006 program. Michael T. Haire with Fisher, Rushmer, Werrenrath, Dickson, Talley & Dunlap spoke on the subjects of important statutes and cases for contractors; consequences of non-compliance for contractors and architects; and Chapter 558, Florida’s new residential construction claims statute at the Lorman seminar “Building Codes in Florida.” Cathy R. LeBeau of Fowler White Boggs Banker in Tampa was elected co-chair of the Hillsborough County Bar Association’s Health Law Committee. Anthony J. Fantauzzi III Fowler White Boggs Banker in Tampa was elected co-chair of the Hillsborough County Bar Association’s Law Week Committee. Karen Meyer Buesing of Zinober & McCrea was the recipient of the “2005 Chairman’s Award” from Leadership Florida. Stephen C. Sawicki of Orlando was named as the Distinguished Fellow for 2005 by The American College of Civil Trial Mediators. Ramon Abadin was elected chair of the Judicial Nominating Commission of Florida, Third District Court of Appeal. Additionally, Gerald A. Wald was elected vice-chair. Scott B. Smith of Lytal, Reiter, Clark, Fountain & Williams was elected chair of the Young Lawyers section of the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers for 2005-2006. H.T. Smith of Miami was appointed director of trial advocacy programs at Florida International University College of Law. Edward M. Ricci of Ricci & Leopold in Palm Beach Gardens joined the National Crime Victim Bar Association. Berger Singerman in Ft. Lauderdale received the “Business of the Year Award” from the South Florida Business Journal. J. Bert Grandoff of Allen Dell in Tampa spoke at the AIA Florida 2005 Convention on Marco Island. Grandoff spoke on “Mold Defects by Design.”last_img read more

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