Australian Prime Minister: ‘No Public Funding’ for Adani’s Proposed Mega-Mine

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享From the Times of India:There is no public funding for Adani’s 21.7 billion dollars coal mine project, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has said as he sought to assure a protester dressed in a fish costume that he took climate change “as seriously as you.”Turnbull made these remarks during an election campaign in South Australia.An environmental protester dressed as the clown fish from animated movie ‘Finding Nemo’ asked him to commit to no public funding for Indian mining giant Adani’s controversial project.“There’s no public funding in Adani’s coal mine,” Turnbull said. He told the protester that he took climate change “as seriously as you.”Adani’s plan to build one of the world’s biggest coal mines in Australia has been hampered time and again. A federal court in August last year had revoked the original approval due to environmental concerns.In October last year, the project got a new lease of life after the Australian government gave its re-approval. Reacting to Turnbull’s remark, Director of energy finance studies at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) Tim Buckley said, “With the permanent decline in seaborne thermal coal markets causing a meltdown in the Australian thermal coal industry, it is hard to imagine a more inopportune moment to attempt to open a multi-billion dollar new mine.”Full article: No public funding in Adani’s coal mine: Australia PM Australian Prime Minister: ‘No Public Funding’ for Adani’s Proposed Mega-Minelast_img read more

Read more →

On the Blogs: ‘Powering the Next Billion Consumers Will Look Very Different Than Powering the First’

first_imgOn the Blogs: ‘Powering the Next Billion Consumers Will Look Very Different Than Powering the First’ FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg New Energy Finance:More than a billion people worldwide live without reliable access to electricity. Providing them with power will require hundreds of billions of dollars of investment, vast deployment of technology, and adaptable business and financial market strategies. Much of the job can be done with power generation systems that are not connected to a central grid, and with largely fuel-free technology.That is, the new grids need not be the enormous, centralized kind that exist in the developed world. If power can be generated where it is consumed — with a solar system connected to home appliances, for example — it can closely follow electricity demand growth. Where does much of that growth come from? Leisure activity.Bloomberg New Energy Finance’s Frontier Power Service tracks the products, services and business models involved in powering the next billion consumers. Last year, our analysts surveyed 26 manufacturers, distributors and pay-as-you-go solar companies to find out what appliances they offer alongside their electricity-generation systems. Televisions and radios were the most significant, and no item seemed to be involved mainly in a business.But to dismiss those items as things used purely for leisure activities is to discount both their importance for human development and their adaptability to commercial uses. Hair clippers, after all, can be used to start a hair salon; a refrigerator can be a building block for a new restaurant. And as an appliance allows people to earn, it also allows them to consume more, offering more opportunities for service providers.This leisure-pull effect isn’t new. In his book “The Shock of the Old,” historian David Edgerton recalls what happened on American farms almost a century ago:‘In 1920 roughly half of all midwestern farms had cars, well over that had telephones, while less than 10 per cent had tractors, running water, or electric lights; for 1930 80 percent had cars, 60 per cent had telephones, and 15-20 percent had electric lights and running water.’In this context, farmers could use cars and radios for leisure purposes before they had electric lights or running water, which require centralized utilities. Today, a billion new consumers may be able to produce and use energy in the same place. Certain types of demand (for electricity to smelt aluminum, say) will still require always-on power in bulk, but for residential and even some commercial demand, distributed systems may scale up faster than centralized grids can extend their service.A final thought: Lack of connection to a centralized grid is a feature of distributed technologies, not a bug. Appliances with no physical wire to a centralized system have an inherent appeal to people with fewer resources, even in the developed world. In its latest wireless substitution study, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that “The second 6 months of 2016 was the first time that a majority of American homes had only wireless telephones.” A deeper look at the data, however, shows that for poor Americans, this majority wireless-only moment happened six years ago. And for the non-poor, it’s still not here:Powering the next billion consumers will look very different than powering the first billion. We should not be surprised if the path ahead runs through leisure activities.More: The way to power the next billion consumerslast_img read more

Read more →

U.S. Banks Aren’t Seen as ‘Stupid’ Enough to Invest in Trump’s Coal Program

first_imgU.S. Banks Aren’t Seen as ‘Stupid’ Enough to Invest in Trump’s Coal Program FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Global Trade Review:Obama’s flagship policy was intended to restrict carbon dioxide emissions and has been under attack from the Republican Party since it came into being in 2014.Now, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Scott Pruitt, has signed an order to scrap the plan, in a bid to boost the country’s coal industry. But experts say that banks that have moved away from coal financing are unlikely to use this as an excuse to go back.“I think they’ll give it consideration but at the end of the day I would be very skeptical that the rollback will have any long-term implications. The reality is the average wind or solar project is costing US$20 per MWh. Could you build a new coal plant for that price? No, it would cost you about US$50 per MWh for gas even,” Tim Buckley, director of energy finance studies at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, tells GTR.He adds: “I can’t see why any US bank is going to turn on a dime and support the Trump plan knowing he might be gone in three years. He’s gone, and you won’t even have built the plant, you’re left with a 40-year stranded asset. It would be stupid.”Over the last few years, a number of large banks have restricted their financing for the coal industry. Deutsche Bank earlier this year committed to ending financing of new coal mining and new coal-fired power plant construction. ING made a similar pledge, but much earlier. The likes of JP Morgan and the Bank of America Merrill Lynch made less sweeping commitments, but pledged to limit their credit exposure to coal.Only ING responded to GTR’s request for fresh comment around whether the stance of the US government would shape their internal policy on coal. The bank says that on the contrary, it expects to accelerate its withdrawal from the sector.“What we can do is adopt a core policy, but we can’t do it all by ourselves, we need government support as well. That’s why we’ve been for years calling for a strong climate accord. We have called for a price for carbon, an end to fossil fuel subsidy and for energy efficiency. We need that as a bank to enable us to incorporate risks into our risk models. We need to price carbon to incorporate carbon pricing into our risk models. We need companies to disclose their carbon footprints to understand the indirect effect we have on society through that carbon footprint,” says the bank’s head of business ethics, Arnaud Cohen Stuart.“Governments can have an important role to increase our leverage on the global agenda. There is a need for a strong accord and we support that. But at the same time we have to take our own responsibility. Regardless of what COP23 will look like, we feel that we don’t need to finance new thermal coal and we intend to accelerate decreasing our exposure,” he adds.Trump’s bullish support of the US coal industry led to a 58% rise in coal exports over the first quarter of this year. This was also facilitated by a decline in coal production in China, which led to greater demand for US coal.However, the boom is likely to be short term and anomalous in the long-term decline of coal. More countries are weaning themselves off burning carbon, while others, such as India, are consuming more of their own product at the expense of imports. The US fossil fuel industry, which funded and supported the Trump campaign vociferously, may be content with the short-term improvement but is acceptant of coal’s fate.In a recent presentation for shareholders, the largest private sector coal company in the world, Peabody Energy, said that it expects 10GW of coal-fired plant retirements per year going forward.“There’s huge scope for the utilisation rate of remaining coal-fired plants to go up to the extent power demand is there, but when you continue to see plant closures, your industry is in terminal decline. Demand has been flat for decades. You’re still seeing 20GW of renewables being built, a net 10GW of gas being built each year. Once you build renewables, there’s a zero margin cost of supply. It will always win the fight,” Buckley says.More: Trump scraps Obama’s climate legacy, but banks unlikely to followlast_img read more

Read more →

Massachusetts, Rhode Island Bet Big on Offshore Wind

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享CommonWealth:The Baker administration placed a bold bet on the economic and environmental benefits of offshore wind Wednesday, selecting one company to build an 800-megawatt wind farm off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard and working with Rhode Island to procure another 400 megawatts at another location in the same area.State officials said they hope the two procurements will kickstart a regional industry with the potential to generate thousands of jobs across southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island and introduce a huge chunk of renewable, emission-free electricity into the region’s power grid. The 800-megawatt procurement, at full capacity, would represent nearly 6 percent of the state’s electricity load, state officials said.Judith Judson, the commissioner of the Department of Energy Resources, which oversaw a procurement process that was carried out by the state’s utilities, said the state should realize long-term benefits by hosting the largest offshore wind project in the United States.Vineyard Wind, a partnership between Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners and Avangrid Renewables, a subsidiary of a utility holding company, won the 800-megawatt contract from Massachusetts. Deepwater Wind, which built the nation’s first commercial offshore wind farm off of Block Island (30 megawatts), won the 400-megawatt procurement from Rhode Island.Lars Pedersen, the CEO of Vineyard Wind, said his project will use New Bedford as its main staging area for construction, which is expected to start in 2019 and be completed in 2021. The wind farm’s transmission line will connect to Barnstable on Cape Cod and, once the turbines are turning, the operations and maintenance for the project will be handled out of Martha’s Vineyard. Pedersen estimated the 800 megawatt project will yield 2,000 job years of employment, the equivalent of 2,000 people working one year. But he said the total value of the project will be realized over time as the industry expands. “We think that these projects are the beginning of an industry,” he said.More: Baker Makes Bold Bet on Offshore Wind Massachusetts, Rhode Island Bet Big on Offshore Windlast_img read more

Read more →

Major Indian manufacturer turns to renewable generation

first_imgMajor Indian manufacturer turns to renewable generation FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享APN News:Wienerberger India’s robotic plant producing over 70,000 large format hollow blocks each day for the fast-growing construction industry has moved to sustainable electricity sources including wind and solar energy.Initially, Wienerberger India’s state-of-the-art factory, located in Kunigal, 70 kms from Bangalore, was dependent solely on conventional energy sources for its electricity requirement. This meant operating heavy duty robotics and other machinery capable of manufacturing a mammoth count of nearly 480 tons of clay blocks per day, 365 days a year, with minimum manual intervention, would need significant energy. In order to reduce dependence on the usual electricity sources, Wienerberger India was always on the lookout for alternative and renewable energy sources that would further its efforts for creating a sustainable roadmap in large-scale manufacturing. Since 2017, the factory was successful in sourcing over 90% of its electricity requirement from solar & wind farms.Adds Monnanda Appaiah, Managing Director, Wienerberger India, “Heavy duty automation and use of technology has made Wienerberger, by far, one of the largest clay block producers in South East Asia. With hi-tech robotics aiding the production process of over 70,000 large format blocks which is equivalent to 630,000 regular bricks per day, it is very obvious that the need for electricity is very substantial. And we are happy to state today that we have successfully managed to channel over 92% of Wienerberger’s electricity needs today from solar and wind energy.”Wienerberger, with a rich heritage spanning two centuries, is a formidable name in the international building manufacturing market. With 200 years of experience & specialization in producing clay-based building material, the company also pioneered [using] green technology in its production methodology. A firm sustainability roadmap is imprinted in the very ethos of the company’s working blueprint.By conscious implementation of processes that not only recycles used energy but also reduce dependence on conventional sources of electricity, the company’s efforts towards adopting greener energy sources like wind & solar, has helped Wienerberger India to successfully set benchmarks for the building manufacturing industry across the country and the world at large.More: Wienerberger India moves to wind and solar energylast_img read more

Read more →

Indonesia considering closing 3,400MW Suralaya coal plant

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Jakarta Post:The government is considering to shut down the aging Suralaya coal-fired power plant (PLTU) in Cilegon, Banten, and replace it with green energy, as Indonesia chases its long-delayed commitments to cut carbon-dioxide emissions.The Energy and Mineral Resources (ESDM) Ministry’s freshly appointed renewables director general, Dadan Kusdiana, said on Nov. 16 that his office was conducting an internal study to replace Suralaya with a battery-equipped solar farm (PLTS). Adding batteries to a solar farm makes it more expensive but enables it to provide 24-hour electricity from the sun, which is otherwise an intermittent energy source.“[Suralaya] is already 35-years-old. We are looking at whether it should be demolished and replaced with a new utility-scale solar farm, with batteries, so there’ll be no intermittency issue,” he told lawmakers at a public hearing in Jakarta.The 3,400-megawatt Suralaya plant comprises seven units that began operations between 1984 and 1997. The plant, owned by PT Indonesia Power, a subsidiary of state-owned electricity giant PLN, is one of the biggest coal plants in Southeast Asia.Suralaya is also the biggest among 5,655MW worth of other coal plants over 20-years-old that the energy ministry is planning to replace with green plants in chasing Indonesia’s renewable energy targets.Furthermore, the coal plant retirement plan also aligned with energy minister Arifin Tasrif’s policy of focusing on solar photovoltaic (PV) over other green energy sources, said Dadan. The country’s renewables power production is currently dominated by hydropower and geothermal. [Norman Harsono]More: Ministry mulls retiring giant Suralaya coal plant, replacing it with solar farm Indonesia considering closing 3,400MW Suralaya coal plantlast_img read more

Read more →

City of Seven Hills

first_imgRichmond, Virginia has been tapped by the Union Cycliste International (UCI), the international governing body of professional cycling, as the host city for the 2015 Road Cycling World Championships. This is the premiere road cycling event on the international scene, with 12 championship races spread over nine days of competition. Athletes compete for their country, just like in the Olympics, in three different disciplines: traditional Road Race, Individual Time Trial, and the relatively new Team Time Trial. World Champions are crowned in each discipline.The UCI stipulates the World Championships be held outside of Europe every five years, in an attempt to globalize cycling’s popularity. When members of the UCI asked U.S. Cycling to bid on the 2015 slot, Richmond was immediately the frontrunner U.S. city.“Richmond has a long history of pro cycling, and the popularity of cycling in general has exploded in the city over the last few years,” says Tim Miller, the executive director of Richmond 2015, the organization that spearheaded the bid to host the championships. “I’m excited to introduce the world to Richmond’s history. I’m hoping the course will highlight a lot of landmarks like the Civil War sites and Monument Avenue. I’m also excited about showcasing the hills we have in the city.”Richmond has earned the nickname “The City of Seven Hills,” because it was built on a significant slope that rises from the James River.“Most of the streets either go up or down,” Miller says. “It should make for an interesting course.”Richmond’s Pro Cycling HistoryRoad Cycling World Championships By the Numbers1983 – Tour of America, the first professional stage race in the U.S., had a stop in Richmond.1989-1990 – Tour de Trump came through Richmond. The tour was sponsored by Donald Trump, started in New York City and finished in Atlantic City as a way to showcase Trump’s hotels and casinos.1991-1996 – Tour DuPont: The Tour de Trump evolved into the Tour DuPont, one of the premier races in the world. Cyclists called it the “Fourth Grand Tour,” and the race hosted legends like Greg LeMond and a young Lance Armstrong. A legal battle killed the race.2003-2006 – Captech Classic: A nationally televised crit race through the heart of downtown Richmond.2007 – US Open of Cycling finished in Richmond, and included a cobblestone climb in Libby Hill Park.Richmond ClassicsMiller and US Cycling are hard at work on developing the course for the race, which they’ll keep under wraps for now. But here are Richmond mainstays that Miller says all roadies should tackle before the pros descend on the city:Main StreetA lot of rides are on the east side of town, and there’s no way to really avoid this hill coming back into town. It can be brutal.Taylor’s HillThis 300-meter cobblestone climb was part of the Tour DuPont.Monument AvenueThis 3.5-mile straight away is one of the few flat roads in Richmond, but it has some cobblestone portions that featured prominently in the Tour DuPont.last_img read more

Read more →

The Floodgates Are Open

first_imgThe sirens ring out. Signal lights flash on top of signs that read “water levels may rise without warning.” In a matter of minutes, the dam opens, and a river that has been dormant for the majority of the year springs to life again.Even though many of the streams in the Southeast have been dewatered for hydroelectric power, American Whitewater (AW) and a number of other river preservation groups have worked to secure recreational releases on the best of these rivers. Paddlers, anglers, hikers, and swimmers can once again enjoy their beauty and carve into their currents. It isn’t surprising that some of the best whitewater festivals in the country occur with Appalachian rivers as their focal points.No paddler’s calendar would be complete without Gauley Fest in Summersville, W.Va. Over 5,000 boaters flock to the Gauley River and Summersville High School fairgrounds. This event injects over $1 million into the local economy in one weekend. The days are filled with class V whitewater, and the nights sometimes enter the misadventure and debauchery categories.One year, I traveled up to Gauley Fest with some non-boaters. One girl had never even seen moving water in her life, but in my youthful optimism, I promised to take her down the class V Upper Gauley in a two-person kayak. She must have weighed all of 110 pounds soaking wet, so how hard could it be, right?This poor girl had no idea what she had gotten herself into. Before she knew it, she was being pummeled by massive waves and holes of rapids like Initiation, Pillow Rock, Iron Ring, and Sweets Falls. She was in the front of the boat with her paddle flailing helplessly, while I guided us from the back. Every time a wall of whitewater hit us, she would absorb the entire impact of our momentum and be plastered back on the boat. She seemed to enjoy the adventure, but I don’t think she’s been on whitewater again since.Gauley Fest evenings are nothing short of legendary. Industry companies host kegs, boat giveaways, sumo wrestling, karaoke, and various other attractions to bring people to their respective booths, and things unravel quickly due to the fact that everyone is camping only feet away. One year, someone made the mistake of bringing boxing gloves. It started off in good fun, with friendly jousting and nobody getting too serious, but before long the big guys of the party had been alerted to the developing single-elimination boxing tournament, and things went south. Several knockouts occurred, and the shenanigans were eventually shut down. Another time, one of the paddling companies announced that it was going to be giving away a free kayak to the person who could catch a greased pig. I myself have fond (albeit hazy) memories of somehow getting into an unlocked Porsche 911 Turbo S late at night, and pretending that I was Mario Andretti in the parked supercar.Beyond Gauley Fest, there are other events in the community that epitomize the outdoor community’s camaraderie. One is a biathlon race in Asheville called Jerry’s Baddle (Bike + Paddle). I participated in the first Baddle in 2006. After an adrenaline and endorphin-fueled day of intense racing in gorgeous weather, competitors gathered afterward to meet the guy whom we had been racing for all day: Jerry Beckwith. Jerry was an avid kayaker and biker who had been combatting ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. He couldn’t speak, but his smile radiated the happiness and appreciation that he had towards everyone for showing up to support him.  As Jerry’s wife read the words of his letter, there wasn’t a dry eye in the crowd. Jerry reflected on the beauties and subtleties of his home river, the Green. And the many memories that he had with great friends there. His letter concluded: “I feel like the luckiest man on Earth. Certainly not because my body is slowly being imprisoned by ALS, but because I am blessed to have a huge number of the truest, most loyal, and compassionate friends anyone could hope for.”Jerry’s words were very powerful to me in that moment, but they also defined the exceptional group of people that I had managed to surround myself with both at the event that day and in my life. These communities are comprised of passionate, generous, fun-loving individuals who truly “suck the marrow out of life.” I smiled through the tears and realized that if I was in the same situation as him, I could say the same thing.Jerry’s fight with ALS ended two weeks after that very first race in 2006, but the event lives on. Once a year in late April, paddlers and bikers converge on Saluda, N.C. and push their own limits to honor a lost friend. These festival-forged friendships are the reason that the Southern Appalachians are home to one of the best outdoor communities in the world.If you are a paddler, make it a point to be there when those sirens go off, and the rivers come back to life. •Best Paddling FestivalsTallulah FestivalApril 13-15, 2013     Tallulah Falls, GA.NOC Demo Days & ShootoutApril 2013     Bryson City, NCJerry’s BaddleApril 2013     Saluda, NCjerrysbaddle.orgCheat FestMay 5, 2012     Albright, W.Va.cheat.orgDominion RiverRock FestivalMay 18-20, 2012     Richmond, VA.dominionriverrock.comPotomac FestTBA (usually around June 25)     Great Falls, MD.potomacfest.comGauley FestSeptember 14-16, 2012     Summersville, W.VA.americanwhitewater.orgNOC Guest Appreciation FestivalSeptember 28-30, 2012Bryson City, N.C.noc.com For a full listing of festivals, click here!last_img read more

Read more →

Mountain Mama: Glamping at the Edisto River Treehouses

first_imgDear Mountain Mama: My in-laws are coming to visit and my wife and I would like to introduce them to the magic of overnight river trips. I’ve been looking into “glamping” options, but I can’t stand the idea of a flat screen tv, guides, or catered meals in the outdoors. I’d like to ease my parents into the backcountry without paying for high-end luxury. Any suggestions? Thanks, Happy CamperDear Happy Camper: Glamping, short for glamorous camping, allows people to experience the outdoors surrounded by creature comforts. Some say the concept started from safaris that catered to individuals with a lot of money who wanted to experience wildlife viewing while sleeping in beds with 1000-count sheets.What constitutes glamping differs depending on an individual’s perspective. Anything from a platform tent to a yurt to a treehouse falls under the definition of glamping. But there are less upscale options that include more amenities than camping.Imagine stopping halfway on a 23-mile canoe trip on an undeveloped river and spending the night in a treehouse. You’d enjoy more amenities than camping. There’d be futons to sleep on and a screened sleeping area that would allow the evening breeze to whisper you asleep. There’d be cooking utensils, an outdoor grill, and a dining deck. The treehouse would be off the grid and the river the only running water. There would be outhouses and oil candles, but nothing more extravagant.tree-house-camping2Owners Anne and Scott Kennedy built Edisto River Treehouses in the middle of a private wildlife refuge on an undammed river. Located midway between Charleston, Columbia, and Savannah, the treehouses are nestled along the river’s edge and accessible only by canoe.The meandering blackwater river allows a relaxing trip, the type of outing enjoyed by many generations. The river flows beneath under huge live oaks cloaked with Spanish moss. The current moves paddlers along at 2-4 knots, but basic canoe handling definitely helps with maneuvering around fallen trees. Abundant wildlife grace the shores, including wild turkey, beaver, kingfisher, great blue heron, and egrets.But don’t take my word for it. Men’s Journal named the treehouses in their “Top 50 Vacation Destinations” and Outside Magazine called it the “Favorite off-the-beaten-path Adventure in South Carolina.”Enjoy! Mountain Mamalast_img read more

Read more →

Trail Mix: The Story of J.P. Harris

first_imgOver the many years that I have been contributing pieces to Blue Ridge Outdoors, I have had the pleasure of chatting with a wide variety of incredible musicians. From the iconic to the unknown, this blog has brought me into contact with a dizzying array of colorful characters.None, perhaps, has been more colorful than J.P. Harris.J.P’s story is nothing if not interesting; now in his early thirties, he’s been on his own since the age of fourteen. He’s traveled the country by foot and freight train, worked as a lumberjack, carpenter, luthier, and laborer. He’s grown more cubic feet of beard than he can ever count, covered his body in tattoos, and cut I’ll Keep Calling, his first record, in just three days.I first interviewed Harris a couple years ago, right around the time he released I’ll Keep Calling; our chat lasted for around two hours. Once I got J.P. rolling, I had to grab hold and hang on. Unabashed in his opinions and more than willing to share them, we rolled through a variety of topics, including iconic country songwriters, the state of country music, and more. J.P. pulled no punches; what I got was the real deal and perfectly honest. It was gold.J.P. is one of a handful of young artists out there making country music the way country music is supposed to sound. Take a listen to his latest record, Home Is Where The Hurt Is, cut with his band, The Tough Choices. You won’t find any hip grindin’ and backwards ball caps, no lifted trucks or homages to cut off denim jeans or dusty river roads. J.P. doesn’t churn out modern country fodder like those many “Nashville pop country jerk offs” – a term he coined but one that I have purloined, because I love it.Instead, Harris’s songs are a scuffed boot to the belly, the soundtrack for love and loss, heartache and pain, all backed by the moan of pedal steel and vintage Fender Telecaster. It’s old country.I recently chatted with J.P. and played a little word association game with him. I threw some words at him and he responded with the first thing that came to mind. As you can imagine, it was pretty entertaining…Blue Ridge Outdoors – Clean shaven faces.J.P. Harris – A lot of extra work in the morning.BRO – Wrapping up a record.J.P. – So much still left to do.BRO – Bad tattoos.J.P. – Good stories.BRO – Working with your hands.J.P. – Part of understanding what truth in work really is.BRO – Life on the rails.J.P. – Fun. Romantic. Dangerous. Everything you hope it would be.BRO – Bro-country.J.P. – Garbage truck.BRO – Country music.J.P. – Good for what ails you.J.P. Harris & The Tough Choices will be all over Virginia in early November. You can catch them at the Lyric Theater in Blacksburg on November 7, Wolf Hills Brewing Company in Abingdon on November 8, The Palisades in Eggleston on November 9, and at Balliceaux in Richmond on November 12.Also, be sure to take a listen to “Give a Little Lovin’,” the brand new track from J.P Harris & The Tough Choices, on this month’s Trail Mix.For more information on J.P., his band, more show dates, or how to get your hands on Home Is Where The Hurt Is, surf over to ilovehonkytonk.com.last_img read more

Read more →