Basketball registration ends Fri.

first_imgBookstore Basketball, the world’s largest outdoor five-on-five basketball tournament, is just around the corner, and the tournament’s organizers are hoping to break their own record by garnering even more teams to play than last year’s 650.Registration for the open and women’s tournaments ends Friday at 5 p.m., but the main goal of the tournament’s executive staff is to raise money and awareness for Jumpball, a basketball camp that provides free instruction and lunch to children in and around Kingston, Jamaica.“The more teams that participate, the more funding we get for the camp,” tournament organizer Jack Goonan, a junior, said. “We want to give kids the chance to play because they have limited funds and opportunities to do so.”Tournament organizer Kelly Flynn, a junior, said Bookstore Basketball funds the entire camp by itself. Last year’s tournament raised $12,000 for the Kingston camp and its satellite locations, making the camp completely free for its participants and providing equipment and personnel for the camp, she said.One of the camp’s coaches is from the Notre Dame community and two of the tournament’s commissioners travel to the camp every summer.“It’s a good charity and a good time, and you get to see where all the money goes to,” Goonan said.Goonan encouraged freshmen to sign up for the tournament since their participation is traditionally low.“Freshmen should sign up because it’s a long running Notre Dame tradition,” Goonan said. “If they sign up now, they can have four years of funny moments on the courts.”Although attracting more participation from the freshman class is a perennial concern, a more serious, time-consuming issue is the submission of inappropriate team names each year.“Every year, we have to sit and go through every single team name and approve them,” Flynn said. “Then, the Student Activities Office reviews and approves that list.”Flynn noted that many teams try to be as funny as possible in creating team names, but what is funny for college students is not always appropriate for such a highly publicized, University-sponsored event.The championship title is up for grabs because last year’s open winners, Hallelujah Holla Back, will not be competing this year, sophomore team member Dayne Crist said.“I can’t play this year because I’m recovering from ACL repair surgery, and [teammate] Joe Fauria transferred to UCLA,” said Crist, a quarterback on the Irish football team. “[Team member] Jonas Gray can’t play because of a new rule restricting football players from playing basketball.”Women’s tournament champions Four Girls and a Guy will be back to defend their title, under a new name with an additional teammate, said senior Molly McCarthy, a member of last year’s team who also helped organize the tournament.She said the team’s victory last year was especially meaningful because her father and teammate Jane Fleming’s father made a surprise appearance at the final game.“The victory with our dads watching is definitely one of my favorite college memories, but I expect nothing less than a great tournament this year,” McCarthy said. “It’ll be hard work to get back to the championship, but we look forward to every game.”The executive staff said they are enthusiastic about the tournament beginning.“We’ve been working on this since December, so it’s been a long process,” Flynn said. “We’re excited to see how many teams will come out.”This year’s open tournament will start on March 27 and end April 25. Any student, staff or faculty member from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross is invited to participate.The large number of teams requires the open tournament to be spread out over the course of a month. Because the women’s tournament only attracts around 70 teams, it begins later than the open tournament.The semifinals and finals will take place the same weekend as the annual Blue-Gold Game, which is set for April 24.last_img read more

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SMEAC to host Earth Week events

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Environmental Action Coalition (SMEAC) will be hosting a series of events and projects celebrating Earth Week, beginning today, in honor of environmental activism.“We have been planning Earth Week for quite a few months now and have worked really hard to put together some great events and activities,” SMEAC board member Ellen Huelsmann said. “Our goal is to make the environment fun and I’m really looking forward to all the great stuff we have planned.”The week’s events begin tonight at 5 p.m. with kickball and tie-dying on Library Green. “It’s a way for us to get people outside and enjoying the warm weather,” SMEAC head of public relations Jamie Thordsen said.Participants are allowed to bring their own items to tie-dye.“People have brought socks, jackets and even sports bras,” she said. On Tuesday, students can sign a pledge to care for a plant from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Center, and on Wednesday, SMEAC will organize the annual “Weight your Waste” event, which measures how much food students waste in the dining hall.“We simply take all the food and liquids left on the trays when students go to place them on the tray belt and put them in big containers,” Thordsen said.The highlight for SMEAC during the week will be Thursday’s Earth Day Student Panel. They have planned for each member to speak on a topic related to raise awareness about the environment.Huelsmann, who will be talking about “The Importance of Biodiversity,” will be one of nine speakers on the panel. Topics that will be discussed include “Business Going Green,” “Your Carbon Footprint” and “Go Green by Eating Green.”“This panel is simply [about] the importance of environment and how we all have a responsibility as members of this planet to protect and preserve it in any way we can,” Huelsmann said.On Friday, SMEAC is organizing an invasive species clean up in the Saint Mary’s Nature Area to help eradicate garlic mustard plants.SMEAC will also be teaming up with the dining hall staff to help limit environmental impact. Trays and straws will be unavailable all week in order to limit waste, and students can bring water bottles with them into the dining hall.“We really want the students to be able to participate in our celebration of the Earth and we are hoping that they get a lot out of everything we have planned,” Huelsmann said.last_img read more

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Thrown into a new job’

first_imgYears before he was appointed Vice President for Student Affairs, Fr. Tom Doyle operated under a different title at Notre Dame — student body president. “I remember I was just a kid from a small town in Washington state. After I was elected, I was worried I was not presidential enough. I talk slow and I have sort of folksy ways about me,” Doyle said. “I remember for the first couple of months trying to be what I thought was presidential but it was so hard for me because I was not good at it. I was not good at not being myself.” Doyle served as student body president during his senior year at Notre Dame from 1988 to 1989, and his experience as an undergraduate leader stuck with him as he returned to campus to work for the University. “Whenever you are thrown into a new job or new profession, there is not a platonic form of student body president or leader or priest. That role needs to become part of who you are. Coming back here to Notre Dame, I assumed a new role and have to constantly remind myself that I have to be the best version of me I can be,” Doyle said. Dealing with the administration as a student prepared Doyle to be an administrator himself. “I found that the administrators really cared a lot about students,” Doyle said. “As I think about myself now, I hope I am as good at understanding and navigating for students as an administrator as my administrators were for me.” Doyle said he also learned how to handle criticism during his time as student body president. “It is not such a terrible thing to have people critique or disagree or take issue with what you are doing or the way you are doing it,” he said. “You have to be convicted that you are following the values that you think are important to you and the promises you have made.” Doyle began his career in student government as the president of Grace Hall during his junior year. Michael Paese, a friend of Doyle’s, suggested the two run for student body president and vice president despite their limited student government experience. “We were outsiders. We were not student government insiders,” Doyle said. “We did not know how everything ran. But we kept talking about it.” Despite his misgivings, Doyle and Paese turned their conversations into a campaign. During the weeks leading up to their election, the team campaigned by knocking on the door to every room in every residence hall. Doyle said he and Paese saw the 1988 presidential election between Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush as an important part of their own term. The team led a voter registration and education drive, which registered over 2,000 students to vote, and held debates on election issues. “It was our insight that Notre Dame is the premier Catholic university in the country,” he said. “Notre Dame and Notre Dame students should be at the forefront of issues that affect our country.” Doyle said many of the same issues mattered students during his term are still important for the current student body. Current student body president Catherine Soler and vice president Andrew Bell focused on community relations after a spike in student arrests and tensions with South Bend police at the beginning of the year, and problems between students and police plagued Doyle’s administration as well. “One of the things that we had to deal with in the fall was police and student issues as well. The issue was that they were using dogs to break up the parties,” Doyle said. “I only wish that we were as effective as this year’s student government at being a good broker and convoy between the South Bend police and the student body. These issues will come up again and again.” Doyle said the current officers deserved praise for smoothing tensions between campus and its neighbors in South Bend. “Especially with a lot of the off-campus issues, the reason that we have found a bit of a détente with law enforcement has to do with Catherine and Andrew and how they have been leaders among their peers,” Doyle said. Doyle dealt with practical problems on campus as well as larger issues in the community. His administration set up the first campus 24-hour space outside the dorms, rented more portable toilets for football tailgaters and surveyed students on the University’s alcohol policy. An editorial printed in the April 4, 1989, issue of The Observer said Doyle and Paese were “a tough act to follow.” Doyle said his position was taxing, but his year with Paese taught him the value of working with a trustworthy partner. “If you are going to do anything that is going to be stretching or challenging, make sure you do it with somebody whose deepest values align with yours,” Doyle said. Doyle and Paese built their success on a friendship that remains after almost 25 years. “[Paese] was a smart, articulate, fast-talking Italian from the East Coast, and I was a much slower, simple, nice guy from a little town in Washington state,” Doyle said. “In a lot of ways we could not have been more different from each other, but together we made a pretty good team.” Despite the lessons Doyle learned during his term, he joked that the immediate rewards of his election were not what he expected. “As student body president, I thought my social life would improve,” he said. “Being elected was not worth it for the social life.”last_img read more

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Off-campus issues addressed

first_imgCampus Life Council (CLC) discussed the creation of an off-campus administrator, a role that would provide students with a source of support and information regarding off-campus issues such as police incidents, lease issues and neighbor conflicts at its meeting Monday. Student body president Catherine Soler said recent off-campus arrests have highlighted the need for a response from student government and the administration. “This weekend, and on Thursday, there were incidents and more arrests,” she said. “We’ll be meeting with administrators to talk about a plan going forward.” Chief of staff Nick Ruof said while some resources do exist, they are too decentralized to be effective. “There’s no real support system in case you have [leasing] or police incidents … Right now, student government is sort of fulfilling that role,” he said. “Other organizations or groups fulfilling the needs of off-campus students are spread around campus.” Fr. Tom Gaughan, Stanford Hall rector, said since many students cite ‘du Lac’ as their reason for leaving campus, they may respond poorly to the creation of such a position. “There could be a section of the off-campus population that would sort of be insulted,” he said. “What they moved away from was to be away from ‘mom’.” Parliamentarian Ben Noe said despite the physical move, students are still connected to the University. “Even if students are moving off campus, they’re not separate, ‘du Lac’ still applies to students,” he said. “If we’re going to hold them accountable shouldn’t they also have support?” Sr. Carrine Etheridge, rector of Farley Hall, brought up the need for students to consider trends in police activity when making decision about socializing off campus. “I wish our students would get savvy. The police, the [Indiana State] Excise Police, they know our schedule,” she said. “They know when there’s going to be parties. Learn from that.” Student body vice president Andrew Bell elaborated on the need for proactive as well as reactive measures. “A lot of our time last semester was spent getting information out,” he said. “It’s about taking that proactive role in addition to taking those calls Monday morning asking for help.” Lt. Col. Jon Crist, Faculty Senate representative, said there is a danger the position could become a “complaint line.” “I think it would be just an umbrella of resources, less of a complaint line,” Soler said. “There’s just a lot of things that are gray and I think if one person were in charge of it all, that would be very beneficial.”last_img read more

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Students lead RecSports fitness classes for their peers

first_imgBetween schoolwork, socializing and extracurricular activities, many Notre Dame students turn to fitness classes to incorporate personal fitness into their busy schedules. But some students take that commitment to fitness even further by working as RecSports student fitness instructors. Senior Caitlin Kinser channels her interest in dance by teaching Zumba, a dance-based fitness program that involves routines set to international music. After attending her first Zumba classes with a friend two summers ago, Kinser continued pursuing her interest in the program through a RecSports class the following fall and became a licensed instructor that October. For Kinser, the decision to become a student instructor instead of a class participant was an easy one. “I said to myself, ‘Okay, I could either pay to take the class or I could get paid to work out and do something that I love,’” Kinser said. “It’s a win-win situation.” Kinser said student fitness instructors are responsible for creating unique routines and workouts for each class meeting and are free to choose accompanying music for the classes. As a member of the Zumba Instructor Network (ZIN), Kinser said she receives CDs and DVDs with suggested songs and choreography. Although the provided material would simplify Kinser’s role as a Zumba instructor, she said she prefers to choreograph most of her own material set to her favorite music, even if it requires more time and effort to do so. “I really enjoy [choreographing classes], but at the same time, it’s the hardest and most time-consuming part,” Kinser said. “My classes are one hour, but it may take me all day to make up new routines.” Senior Allie Hamman decided to become an indoor cycling instructor after her own instructor of two years encouraged her to pursue the opportunity through RecSports. To qualify for the position, Hamman took a grueling indoor cycling instruction course that involved six hours of biking and a written exam. She is now completing her second year as a RecSports instructor. Although indoor cycling is essentially an individual sport, Hamman said her role as an instructor has allowed her to encourage class participation in common fitness goals. “Normally, working out is more of a personal thing and instructing’s more about projecting what you want people to do,” Hamman said. Both Kinser and Hamman said they faced some initial difficulties leading their first few classes. “Having the microphone on definitely took some getting used to. I think that was the hardest thing,” Kinser said. “Because I did a lot of dance in high school, I’m used to learning and doing choreography, but when you’re dancing you don’t have to tell people what’s coming next, you just do it.” However, Kinser said those challenges gradually disappeared as she became accustomed to teaching her classes. “After teaching for about a month, I got comfortable with it and started being able to have fun when I was teaching, so now I’ve kind of got my own style,” Kinser said.   Though developing class workouts can be challenging, Hamman said she tries to motivate her students by providing them with fresh, interesting workouts each week. “You never want someone to come to a class and think, ‘I could have done this on my own. Why am I here?’” she said. “You want to be pushing them further than they would normally push themselves, which I think is the goal of having a fitness instructor.” Whatever the difficulties of their respective positions, Kinser and Hamman agreed the rewards of seeing students improve outweigh the challenges of their jobs. “There were people that I could see a physical difference in, and that’s really rewarding, because ultimately you want to see your students succeed and you want to see them getting fitness results,” Kinser said. It’s always rewarding to see people doing something I enjoy and knowing that they are feeling the enjoyment that I am trying to project,” Hamman said. Students can visit recsports.nd.edu for more information on student-instructed fitness courses and other RecSports fitness programs.last_img read more

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Farley revives fundraiser calendar

first_imgAlthough Notre Dame has no shortage of long-held traditions, Farley Hall intends on renewing one long forgotten. Farley’s Finest are bringing back the Men of ND calendar, a former hall fundraiser, to benefit the Sex Offense Services Rape Crisis Center of St. Joseph County. Kelsie Corriston, Farley Hall secretary, said the idea to reinstitute the calendar came from former rector Sr. Carrine Etheridge in 2011, although organizers were given few details. “We didn’t have any old copies or information to go on initially, so we revamped it ourselves,” she said. “It’s been an awesome learning process.” The search for student-models was an extensive process, Corriston said. “We tried to get the word out as much as possible,” she said. “We created a Facebook event, emailed clubs, talked to hall councils and wrote a letter to The Observer.” Students either applied themselves or were nominated by friends, Corriston said. After reviewing the submissions, 20 men were brought in for interviews. “We chose students based on their involvement on campus and the uniqueness of their stories,” she said. “We tried our best to represent the diversity of Notre Dame given our applicant pool.” Corriston and her co-organizers used the interviews to seek out students from dynamic backgrounds. “From the engineer who spends time modifying toys for disabled children to an Eagle Scout whose dream is to fight hunger … we were really impressed by each man’s engagement in service, dedication to academics and love for the University,” she said. “It was cool to discover so many different experiences that were still quintessentially Notre Dame.” 12 models were selected from the group interviewed, but the decisions did not end there. Corriston said the committee gave thorough consideration to determining which student best represented each month. “We tried to match months to their activities,” she said. “Mr. October is one of the band majors, so we wanted to make sure he was [pictured for] a month during football season.” Initial reactions to the calendar were mixed, but Corriston said the charitable cause swayed many critics. “A lot of people initially think we’re doing something similar to a firemen’s calendar that objectifies men,” she said. “However, once they hear our intentions they think it’s an awesome idea,” she said.last_img read more

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Professor analyzes Aquinas’s view on God, good and evil

first_imgFr. Brian Davies, a distinguished professor of philosophy at Fordham University, has dedicated his academic career to studying and writing about the philosophy of religion, and has focused on the work of Thomas Aquinas. Fr. Davies explored the question of why, if God is all powerful and morally good, there is evil present in the world in a lecture held Tuesday night at Rice CommonsThe lecture focused on Aquinas’s rejection of the argument against the existence of God. According to Aquinas, God is not a morally good agent, despite popular belief.“Aquinas views that God should not be thought of as a moral agent in the first place, meaning that God should not be thought of as something either morally good or morally bad,” Davies said. “Aquinas maintains that we do not know what God is … God is strictly non-classifiable.”Virtues are to only be associated with human beings, not God, Davies said.“Aquinas thinks of virtues as what people need in order to flourish as human beings,” Davies said. “So he doesn’t think of God as having the cardinal virtues … Aquinas doesn’t think of God as being actually or possible virtuous.”According to Davies, Aquinas believes it is difficult to attribute goodness to specific things, especially God, because the idea of goodness is concept-dependent.“’Good’ does not signify some distinct property had by all good things,” Davies said. “For him, the meaning of good is noun-dependent. There are good all sorts of things, but what makes them good make them different from kind to kind — goodness is, in a sense, relative. Aquinas thinks that creaturely goodness must somehow reflect what God is.“Aquinas doesn’t think of God as containing creaturely goodness, but rather, goodness in creatures is a dim reflection of what exists simply and undivided-ly in God”.The same argument applies to the subject of evil, according to Davies. Like goodness, Aquinas does not view evil as something of substance.“Many things are generally in a bad way and he thinks that the sentence ‘evil exists’ makes sense,” he said. “On the other hand, he doesn’t think of evil as a substance. Since Aquinas thinks that victims of evil suffering certainly exist, he takes it for granted that God is causally accounted for their being victims of evil suffering. He does not think that the evil in evil suffered is any kind of substance — there is only evil suffered only inasmuch there is a lack of goodness, and Aquinas does not think a lack of goodness is something ‘create-able’.”Aquinas believed there is a problem in the world, but the problem stemmed from a lack of goodness and obligation, rather the existence of evil, Davies said.“Aquinas recognizes that there being something to be called the problem of evil, is rather a problem of why God has not created more goodness,” Davies said. “However, Aquinas does not believe that God has an obligation to create more goodness any more than God has an obligation to create at all.”Tags: Fordham University, Fr. Brian Davies, Theology, Thomas Aquinaslast_img read more

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Jenkins comments on DACA legislative deadlock

first_imgUniversity President Fr. John Jenkins commented in a press release Thursday on the failure of the United States Senate to advance immigration legislation that would have resolved the legal limbo surrounding Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) protections for undocumented immigrants brought to the country as children. This group, known as “Dreamers” faces uncertainty as an early March deadline for resolving their status fast approaches with no solution in sight.“I am deeply disappointed that the Senate failed to pass a bipartisan immigration bill that would have, at long last, protected Dreamers,” Jenkins said in the press release. “These young women and men have done nothing wrong and have known life only in the United States.”Jenkins expressed particular concern for the Dreamers at the University.“The Dreamers who are enrolled at Notre Dame are also poised to make lasting contributions to the United States,” he said in the statement.In the statement, Jenkins expressed hope for a legislative solution and emphasized that Notre Dame will continue to support its Dreamer population.“We pray that our leaders will end the cruel uncertainty for these talented and dedicated young people who have so much to offer our nation,” he said. “Regardless, Notre Dame will continue to support them financially, maintain their enrollment, provide expert legal assistance should that become necessary and do everything it can to support them.”Tags: DACA, DREAMERS, U.S. Senate, University President Father John Jenkinslast_img read more

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Students, alumni reflect on history of Notre Dame vs. USC rivalry

first_imgAs the Notre Dame vs. University of Southern California (USC) football game approaches, students and alumni prepare to witness once again the long-standing and celebrated rivalry between the two schools.One of the most widely-known rivalries in college football, the Notre Dame vs. USC faceoff began in 1926 and has occurred every year since, with the exception of 1943-1945 during World War II.How the rivalry actually began is a source of debate. Some cite a rumor that Bonnie Rockne, wife of Irish head coach Knute Rockne, was swayed by Marion Wilson, wife of USC athletic director Gywnn Wilson. Wilson’s argument, the rumor goes, was that a Notre Dame vs. USC rivalry would mean traveling to sunny and warm California for a bi-annual game during the frigid South Bend winter.Others claim the rivalry began because of the financial needs of the teams, as well as the friendship between Knute and Trojans head coach Howard Jones.Although there have been many famous games in this storied rivalry, the 1988 faceoff — wherein Notre Dame was ranked first in the nation and USC was ranked second with both teams carrying undefeated records — is remembered as one of the most nail biting yet.David Sauve (’90) attended the game at USC with a group of Notre Dame students.“For a period of about 20 years, the winners of the Notre Dame vs. USC game was likely playing for the national championship,” Sauve said. “So for that particular game there was still a lot of energy. … That entire aura around that game was spectacular because of that noteworthy status of both of those teams.”Sauve said he sat on the Notre Dame side with other students, and with some USC alumni and fans in front of him.“[The USC alumni] were all very kind and courteous to us because they knew we were students and treated us very well during the game,” Sauve said.He said he remembers the moment he knew Notre Dame would win the game. It happened after the first play, he said, when Notre Dame player Raghib “Rocket” Ismail caught the football, even after quarterback Tony Rice slipped while throwing it.“You knew as a Notre Dame fan when you saw that play that we were going to be fine because they weren’t afraid to be aggressive and take the tact to USC,” Sauve said. “We were ecstatic. We knew, since that was the last game of the year, that wherever Notre Dame ended up they would be playing for the national championship.”This year, the USC game will take place at 7:30 p.m. at Notre Dame Stadium. Community members are preparing with anticipation for the faceoff.Sophomore Reynold Hamar, a board member of the Notre Dame California Student Club, has helped organize an alumni reception party for Notre Dame students and alumni from California visiting the University for this weekend’s game.“I’ve been counting down the days, especially knowing friends that go to USC,” Hamar said. “It’s such a fun day and so great for our school. The way it brings people together and the whole campus together, I think it’s incredible.”Originally from Southern California, Hamar said he is familiar with the long-standing rivalry between the two schools.“Growing up 45 minutes from USC campus, I grew up hating Notre Dame and cheering against it,” Hamar said. “It’s interesting because I feel like, for me, Notre Dame and USC practically don’t make sense to be rivals. They are not geographically related … but in a lot of ways that is what makes the rivalry. Midwest vs. California. City vs. rural. … Football is the perfect catalyst for that. …  It is definitely one of the best rivalries in college football.”Tags: Bonnie Rockne, football rivalry, Gywnn Wilson, Knute Rockne, Marion Wilson, Notre Dame versus University of Southern California, rivalrylast_img read more

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Mainly Dry Weather For Foreseeable Future

first_imgJAMESTOWN – High Pressure begins to build in today and will last for much of the upcoming week with lots of sunshine.For today, partly cloudy with a stray shower or thunderstorm possible. Highs near 80.Tonight, mainly clear with lows in the upper-50’s.The period for Monday through Thursday will be mainly dry with lots of sunshine. A slight chance for a rain shower or thunderstorm is possible each day. Temperatures will range in the lower to mid-80’s during this period. As of now, all-be-it early Independence day is looking dry. There will be a system close by that may provide for some showers or storms. Highs in the mid to upper-80’s.WNYNewsNow is a proud Ambassador for the NOAA Weather-Ready Nation program.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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