‘Treasure Life’s Journey’ at 2016 Rose Parade Aboard the 13th Annual Donate Life Float

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Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News ‘Treasure Life’s Journey’ at 2016 Rose Parade Aboard the 13th Annual Donate Life Float Gift of Life Celebrated by Organ Donors and Recipients—Walking, Riding and Honored In Memoriam with Brilliant ‘Floragraph’ Images From STAFF REPORTS Published on Thursday, December 10, 2015 | 6:08 pm EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Make a comment Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Top of the News center_img Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Herbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyBohemian Summer: How To Wear The Boho Trend RightHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week More Cool Stuff Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News Community News The 13th annual Donate Life float in the January 1, 2016 Rose Parade teaches us all to “Treasure Life’s Journey,” the theme of this year’s float. The float will feature 52 men and 44 women whose own journeys have been touched by the incredible gift of organ donation and transplantation.The float will feature:• 24 riders, who are organ and tissue recipients (or, in a few cases, are family members representing loved ones who were transplant recipients)• 12 walkers, ordinary men and women who made the remarkable but increasingly widespread choice of donating a kidney to a family member or even a stranger• and 60 “floragraphs,” portraits made from flowers depicting deceased donors whose legacies are celebrated by their loved ones.“The act of organ and tissue donation weaves together a tapestry of donors and recipients, of hope and remembrance, and beloved family and friends who live on through the most miraculous of gifts,” said Tom Mone, Chairman of the Donate Life float committee and CEO of OneLegacy, the nonprofit organ, eye and tissue recovery organization serving the greater Los Angeles area. “The riders, walkers and floragraph honorees who will accompany the 13th annual Donate Life float each have an amazing story to tell. With over 123,000 people waiting on the national transplant list today, we hope that these honorees will inspire millions more to register as organ donors.”The 96 honorees hail from across the country, including men and women of every age, race and origin.The following are but three of the dozens of stories of connection, hope, and the gift of life:Float rider Miguel Santos of Lancaster, New York, was able to see his first-born son because of a donated cornea he received from an unknown donor less than three months before his son’s birth in December of 1993. A consumer advocate and church deacon, Miguel has dedicated years to helping others decide to donate life—and recently received a second tissue donation to repair his gums after complications from diabetes.Fact: Over 40,000 patients have their sight restored every year through cornea transplants.Walker Nichole Piatt of Granada Hills, CA made the decision to donate in the middle of profound family upheaval. She had just given birth to her daughter when her mother died—less than one year after her sister was diagnosed with stage four renal failure. After recovering from childbirth and mourning the loss of her mother, she gave one of her kidneys to her sister—and gave her daughter a healthy aunt.Fact: Eighty percent of people on the national transplant waiting list need kidneys. It is medically impossible to meet this need with kidneys from the very rare opportunity of deceased donation, making living donations even more crucial. More than 6,000 lives are saved each year by living kidney and liver donors.Floragraph honoree Major Kelley Chase was born in Taos, NM and lived in Oklahoma City, OK. A veteran of the United States Air Force, an Oklahoma City police officer, and a husband and father or two, Major Chase decided early on to become an organ donor, signing up for the registry and noting his decision in his will. Through his organ and tissue donation, six lives were saved, and the man whose chest holds Kelley’s beating heart, float rider Ralph Howell of Edmond, OK, has become “Grandpa Ralph” to Kelley’s children.Fact: An organ donor can save the lives of up to eight people by donating their heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, pancreas and small intestines, and enhance the lives of up to 50 people by donating their corneas, skin, bones, heart valves and more.Other honorees include Brice Fabing (floragraph), who made the decision to be a donor only months before he died, providing lifesaving transplants to Jim Stavis (rider), whose rare blood type makes him an especially unlikely triple transplant survivor; father and daughter Ommy and Oceana Irizarry (floragraph), who were killed by a plane crash, whose wife and mother called donating their tissue in the wake of tragedy “the easiest decision I had to make”; and Carmen Tarleton (rider), who lost her sight, her lips and the ability to breathe through her nose when her husband brutally attacked her with industrial strength lye, and became the first successful recipient of a full face transplant from a less-than-complete match. She has also become a friend to her donor’s daughter Marinda.The Donate Life Float began on New Year’s Day 2004, prompted by lung recipient Gary Foxen (Orange, CA), as a way to show gratitude to the donors who made life-saving transplants like his possible, and to inspire others to become organ, eye, and tissue donors. Today 40 million Rose Parade viewers see the float from the stands in Pasadena, CA and on TV across the world.Additionally, throughout November and December events are held in cities and towns around the country to put the finishing touches on floragraph portraits and to present dedicated roses to donor families and community partners that play a role in making donation possible. The float will be available to view by members of the media by appointment while final decoration takes place from December 26 through December 31, and during the judging on December 31, 2015. Following the Rose Parade, the float will be on display at Post Parade: A Showcase of Floats, Victory Park at 2575 Paloma St, Pasadena, from January 1-3, 2016.For information on the Donate Life float and all of the riders, walkers, and floragraph honorees, please visit www.donatelifefloat.org.All Donate Life float sponsors encourage parade viewers to join the nation’s more than 117 million registered donors so that everyone whose life depends on a transplant may receive one. Registrations can be made through state registries, links to which can be found at www.DonateLifeAmerica.org. Further information about the Donate Life float, decorating, and facts about donation and transplantation can be found at www.donatelifefloat.org.The theme of the 2016 Rose Parade is “Find Your Adventure.” The Donate Life float, “Treasure Life’s Journey” depicts a caravan scene at a desert oasis. The float celebrates the journey of life and the legacy of adventures by donors and recipients.The 127th Rose Parade presented by Honda will take place Friday, January 1, 2016, at 8:00 a.m. (PST) featuring majestic floral floats. For additional information on the Tournament of Roses please visit the official website at www.tournamentofroses.com.last_img read more

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New ‘Fire on the Beach’ Burns Bright on Asbury Avenue

first_imgNAMED FOR A BOOK ABOUT THE LIFE SAVING SERVICEEven the restaurant’s name comes from left of center.Charles Coburn said he chose it, in part, after reading “Fire on the Beach,” a 2001 book about the only all-black unit in the U.S. Life Saving Service, which performed dangerous rescues in the surf along the East Coast, and eventually became part of the U.S. Coast Guard. And the restaurant’s distinctive logo, a colorful fish, is based on a drawing by the late Grateful Dead leader Jerry Garcia.Charles Coburn calls Fire on the Beach a “farm-to-fork” restaurant, and he boasts “80 percent of my menu comes from within a hundred miles of here.”Baked goods come from Wards Pastry, nearby on Asbury Avenue. Fire on the Beach uses coffee beans roasted by Crescent Moon Coffee in Mullica Hill, Gloucester County. And Coburn buys seasonal vegetables from Blue Moon Acres in Pennington, Mercer County. (The Coburns grown some of their own ingredients, such as basil and kale, in three aeroponic Tower Gardens in the restaurant’s dining room.)Judith Coburn, a breast-cancer survivor who teaches chemistry and physics at Atlantic County Institute of Technology when she’s not at the restaurant, said there’s a benefit to using locally sourced ingredients.“It’s recycling money,” she said. “If you put money in your neighbor’s pocket, they’re going to put it back in yours.”Charles Coburn hopes that sense of community will carry Fire on the Beach beyond Labor Day and through the lean winter months. Except for a three-week vacation in January, Coburn plans to keep the restaurant open year-round.He’s planning a series of private tasting events during the fall and winter to benefit local charities such as Cape-Atlantic C.A.T.S. (Citizens Altering the Strays), an Ocean City-based organization that helps find homes for roughly 400 stray cats and kittens from the area each year. Local artists have offered to donate pieces of their work to be auctioned off during the events, Coburn said.And this fall, Fire on the Beach will start hosting regular open-mike nights featuring area musicians.Asked if he sees any similarities between being a rock ’n’ roll drummer and running a restaurant, Coburn said: “You have an audience. It’s a performance. For me, it’s performance art. The actual making of (the food), the stories behind it, the entertainment value.“I’ve been on stage since I was in second grade. I see no reason to get off now.” Since opening in April, Fire on the Beach has earned a reputation for original cuisine cooked with ingredients from local farms.By Tim Zatzariny Jr. For OCNJ DailyCharles Coburn does not need to tell you his life story.It’s on the menu at his new Ocean City restaurant, Fire on the Beach.“I can walk you through all of my menus and I can tell you a story about how each item came to be,’ said Coburn, 57, during a recent interview at the restaurant on Asbury Avenue.For example, in the mid-1970s, Coburn had a girlfriend who worked at the Taylor Pork Roll stand on the Boardwalk, “So I ate a lot of pork roll.”The Jersey Devil (Taylor pork roll, cheddar, poached eggs and Dijon Hollandaise on an open-faced, fresh-baked biscuit) from Fire on the Beach’s breakfast menu, is Coburn’s tribute to that long-ago summer.Charles and Judith Coburn are the owners and operators of the new Fire on the Beach restaurant on the 900 block of Asbury Avenue in Ocean City, NJ.And the PBBJ French Toast (stuffed with peanut butter and bananas, and covered with warm, house-made fruit preserves) honors a family member.“My father swore by the fact that he could eat a peanut-butter sandwich for breakfast, lunch and dinner and never miss any other food,” Coburn recalled with a laugh.The Pleasantville High School graduate takes pride in bucking typical shore fare such as pizza and fries, in favor of an offbeat menu built on ingredients sourced mostly from area farms and dairies.__________Fire on the Beach949 Asbury Ave., Ocean City(609) 840-6822fireonthebeachnj.comHours: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)Dinner reservations accepted__________The burgers at Fire on the Beach are made with a house blend of beef ground especially for the restaurant, Coburn said. And the seafood items on the menu’s “Gallery Bites” small-plates section, such as sake-poached scallops and buttermilk oysters, come from local purveyors.Coburn admits that trying something different in a town steeped in tradition is a big risk, but one he says is paying off since Fire on the Beach opened April 17.“Now, you can’t even come here to dinner unless you have reservations,” he said of the 58-seat restaurant he runs with his wife of four years, Judith.The focus at Fire on the Beach, he said, is on an overall experience, not just stuffing one’s face.“Dining involves ambience. It involves the artwork, the music, the temperature, the color of the walls what your server’s wearing, how they treat you,” he said. “It involves how the food is presented. It involves a story behind everything.”The dining room at Fire on the Beach doubles as an art gallery — its walls covered with paintings and photographs by local artists. All the artwork is for sale.Charles Coburn, a self-proclaimed “foodie,” has spent most of his adult life in the culinary industry, as a well-traveled consultant, chef and restaurant owner (he’s worked everywhere from Florida to the island of Dominica in the Caribbean.) That is, when he wasn’t behind a drum kit. Coburn spent decades keeping the beat in area rock bands, and he hasn’t lost the look: granny-glasses, mustache, soul patch.Nor has he lost his sense of showmanship. As a group of diners left the restaurant on a recent morning, Coburn shouted after them, ““Come back a couple hundred more times this week, huh?”Charles Coburn was working in the kitchen at the Princeton in Avalon last year when he learned through a co-worker that the building at 949 Asbury Ave. was available (the spot formerly housed Sunrise Café, which relocated to 12th Street and Asbury Avenue earlier this year.)The Coburns, who live in Egg Harbor Township, decided they’d try to make Ocean City a “culinary destination,” even though it’s a dry town, Charles Coburn said.The challenge he said, was to create “a whole concept so different that you could justify driving from Vineland, from Hammonton, from Cape May, making it a point to come here.”And he’s willing to go out of his way for the right ingredients. Coburn buys organic, made-to-order grits, oatmeal, grains and flour directly from Anson Mills in South Carolina. Irish oatmeal (slow-cooked steel cut oats, apples, cinnamon, lavender, butter and sweet cream) is the runaway customer favorite on the breakfast menu at Fire on the Beach, Coburn said.last_img read more

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Get Sassie! brings out edible sugar glues

first_imgGet Sassie! has developed a new range of edible sugar glue products to help both professional and home bakers decorate cakes and biscuits.The 100% edible range includes SassieSap, an edible glue that can be applied up to 12 hours in advance to assemble gingerbread houses.The SassieStick edible glue stick is suitable for securing sweets, liquorice or other decorations to gingerbread house exteriors or Christmas cookies or biscuits.The SassieShot is a sugar melting gun with two temperature settings, incorporating a no-drip nozzle, as well as a comfortable grip handle to make cake decorating easier.Amy Adams, president and co-founder of Get Sassie!, said: “Our products give bakers the tools they need to turn their visions into beautiful, edible realities.”last_img

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Warriors’ Klay Thompson finally honored for his defense

first_imgKlay Thompson, lauded for his defense throughout his eight-year NBA career, was finally honored for it Wednesday by landing on the All-Defensive team for the first time.The Warriors’ five-time All-Star guard was voted onto the All-Defensive second team, where he was joined by teammate Draymond Green, who made the prestigious team for the fifth time in his career.Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo, Jazz center Rudy Gobert and Thunder forward Paul George, the three finalists for the NBA …last_img

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The People Tracking Every Touch Pass And Tackle in the World Cup

With each click and drag of a mouse, young soccer fanatics are creating the building blocks of the advanced stats that are changing how the sport is played, watched and analyzed.Opta and Prozone are among the companies that have taken soccer stats far beyond goals and saves, into the realm of pass completion percentage, defensive touches, percentage of aerial balls won, tackle percentage and goals scored above expectation. Cameras alone can’t process all these stats. So companies employ people — mostly young, mostly male, most logging matches in their spare time as a second job — to watch matches and document every event.Their work has helped develop stats that capture the value of players who don’t score many goals, but who set them up with pinpoint passing and hustle. Teams use advanced stats to decide which players to buy and put on the pitch. And fans, whether they like it or not, read and hear more numbers than ever before about this sport that for so long bucked the sports-analytics trend.On a Sunday last month, Opta1Opta Sports provides soccer stats to ESPN, which owns FiveThirtyEight. Opta also provides stats for other sports, including cricket, rugby and motor sports. Last year, Opta was bought for 40 million pounds ($67 million) by Perform Group. let me watch as the loggers at its South London headquarters tracked the last 10 matches of England’s Premier League season. I stood among rows of young men at computer monitors as they scrutinized games, sometimes rewinding on one monitor to check a tough call while keeping track of the live feed on another. I tried to stay out of the way while their supervisor leapt away from watching his favorite team’s match to confirm every goal was attributed correctly. And I watched as Opta’s media team processed the raw numbers — 1,600 to 2,000 events per game — into TV-ready factoids, which they heard commentators repeat to TV audiences moments later.In soccer stats, as in so many other numbers-gathering endeavors, big data sets are built piece by piece by human collectors with human imperfections, moods and preferences. Throughout the year, 350 part-time analysts working in London and a half-dozen other Opta branches in Europe and North and South America record every pass, header and goal while watching live or recorded video of more than 14,000 matches around the world. The London operation I watched will be logging each of the World Cup’s 64 matches.Opta says software, standards and oversight can help it harness the best of human judgment while curbing any potential downsides. It sees the people behind its stats as a selling point. I wasn’t the first to be invited to watch. Many prospective customers visit during matches, said Aidan Cooney, chief executive of Opta. “Frankly, that sells the business.”The business is providing stats to professional clubs, to national teams, to leagues — as the official data provider for the top divisions in England, Spain and Germany — and to the media.A Tebow jersey and a Yankees capMy day at Opta was an unusually busy one: Every Premier League club was playing its last match of the season. The finale wasn’t as exciting as 2012’s: Manchester City was all but assured of edging Liverpool for the title, and most Champions League and Europa League slots had been sewn up. The biggest suspense was whether Tottenham would finish in sixth or seventh in the league.That was the case, anyway, for Paul Pettitt, 31, who is the assistant manager of data collection and a Tottenham Hotspur supporter. He spent the two hours between kickoff and final whistle alternately tracking Tottenham’s match against Aston Villa — when Tottenham took an early lead, he said he wanted a 25-goal win to contend for fifth place on goal differential — and jumping out of his chair to check on calls in other games, such as whether an early Swansea goal was a deflection. All logged events scrolled down a screen at his station, and when an important one came up, he conferred with the analyst who entered it.This is when soccer’s rare stoppages of play are so valuable for analysts. A lengthy goal celebration allows loggers to rewind and rewatch goals and other major events, often while Pettitt looks on.But most of the work is logging routine passes. Opta’s analysts log each one by dragging and clicking a mouse at the spot where the pass was received, then keying in the player who received it. Their monitors have an image of a soccer pitch in the background with video of the live match superimposed on top.Confusingly, to my eyes, the broadcast image hardly ever corresponded to the image on the field. So loggers had to drag the mouse to a spot that had nothing to do with the ball’s location in the video rectangle. None of the loggers I watched got stuck on this point: After all, this was the 38th and last match of the season.Each of the 10 matches had a pair of analysts assigned to it, plus a checker. Each analyst had his own monitor and tracked only one team’s touches. Sometimes the analysts conferred over calls — “Is it a tackle?” was a question in the fourth minute of the Liverpool match. (It wasn’t.)Until eight years ago, Opta didn’t even produce the live numbers that are now such a staple of TV broadcasts. Pettitt started at Opta in 2001, fortunately just as the company was phasing out pen-and-paper logging. He wasn’t lucky enough to miss the VCR era. “My elbow started aching after a while” from all the rewinding, he recalled.The more unusual a team’s formation, the harder it is to log its matches. A well-organized side like Barcelona can be easy to log, Khalid Hussain, U.K. training manager for Opta, said. Today he particularly enjoys challenging matches.At his peak, Hussain was logging 10 to 15 matches a week during each Premier League season. His primary assignment was Arsenal, and he also worked four nights a week covering matches around the world. He once logged six matches in a day. “Then I went home at the end, in a pretty bad state,” he said.All this meticulous work changed how Hussain, now 33, watches soccer. He became “very passionate” about Arsenal, to the point where he’d enjoy watching a Gunners match against Stoke more than Real Madrid versus Barcelona, a minority opinion in global soccer. When he clicked a name at one end of the pitch and then entered the same name at the other end seconds later, he came to appreciate the players who covered a lot of territory more than the flashy dribblers.And he learned that his previous pet stat of possession time doesn’t mean much. “Working here burst that bubble,” Hussain said. “It doesn’t matter how much ball you’ve got. You’ve still got to do something with it.”Hussain is mainly a supervisor now, though he pitches in as an analyst when needed. On this day, he logged Cagliari for its 1-0 loss to Chievo.2Opta didn’t make available for an interview any of its more junior analysts who were working the Premier League matches. Like other pinch-hitters who aren’t familiar with their assigned clubs’ players and formations, Hussain watched DVDs of recent Cagliari matches to prepare.The loggers Hussain supervises generally are between 18 and 24 years old and male. (“We’ve got two girls in Leeds, and one girl in Germany,” he said.) They love sports. They enter an office fantasy NFL league. They go home and play video games. They day I watched, none wore soccer apparel but I spotted a Tim Tebow jersey and a Yankees cap.It helps to be nuts about soccer, to appreciate “a job where they get to come in and watch football,” as Pettitt put it.There is occasionally cheering in the analysts’ box. “As much as you can try to control them, if Liverpool score a goal while Man City are down a goal, you might hear a yelp from our Liverpool fan, and probably some censored words as well,” Pettitt said.Candidates are tested for their understanding of soccer and their hand-eye coordination when using the Opta logging software. They have to type quickly with their left hands, without looking at the keyboard. Certified soccer coaches sometimes don’t have the required hand-eye coordination; the avid PlayStation players often do. “We give them five-hour tests, and pick out the ones who are best,” Hussain said.At that stage, successful applicants remain far from match-ready. It will be at least a month before they’ll produce usable data, even under the easiest conditions of logging a recorded match. “For training, they do the same game over and over for two or three days,” Hussain said.Cooney, the Opta chief executive, has tried his hand at logging, “much to everyone’s amusement,” he said. “It’s impossible, absolutely impossible for someone of my motor skill set,” he added. “If you don’t play PlayStation, basically, you’re finished.”Opta employs full-time analysts to review every event of the matches it logs, a process that can take three to five hours. Its live analysts get 99 percent of player identifications correct, Pettitt said.The match-trackers are rated on their performance, and the best get spare games.3Opta doesn’t disclose how much it pays analysts. It creates a competition, and “keeps them on their toes,” Hussain said. He’s confident that today he’s one of the best loggers in London. He also gets to travel to train loggers at offices around Europe.The dubious goals panelAmong Opta’s competitors is Prozone Sports, which tracks players on the pitch using cameras and player-recognition systems. Stewart Mairs, the U.S. operations manager for Prozone, said the company’s optical tracking system — like SportsVU’s for the NBA — gives it a leg up over Opta. The system produces millions of data points per game.Prozone, like Opta, needs human loggers, too. Prozone’s cameras sometimes can’t tell players apart when they cluster, and don’t distinguish crucial game events. So it employs coders, usually interns or students who are interested in soccer, Mairs said. Like at Opta, they are supervised and trained by more experienced managers, and, for big matches, supplemented by more experienced coders.Cooney said Opta is offering something different from camera tracking. “People want analytics,” he said. “That requires holistic data sets, which only we can deliver.”Keeping standards consistent across offices is vital for Opta. An assist needs to mean the same thing in London, New York and Montevideo. Soccer stats already have plenty of doubters, and it doesn’t help that different companies track different numbers. Also, individual companies sometimes change what they track, as Opta does nearly every year after an annual review. (Possibly coming soon: more detail on fouls.)So it’s all the more important that a company’s data can be trusted across space and time. “What we’ve had as a clearance” — a defender clearing a ball out of the goal area — “has always been the same, and will not change,” Pettitt said.In addition to post-match reviews, Opta monitors stats across leagues, to make sure they don’t vary too much — and if they do, that it’s because of style of play and not analyst inconsistency.Opta also updates its stats according to decisions of a Premier League group called the dubious goals panel, which weighs whether a player should be awarded a goal when, say, the shot deflected off a defender.Close calls mean the live data is provisional. It’s good enough for television broadcasters, who pepper Opta’s media team with questions via instant message during the matches. I wandered over to watch the media group in action during play. They sat next to a wall with six television screens, usually more than enough but four short of the required number on this day. So laptops filled the gap.During play, the media team moved quickly. Liverpool’s Martin Skrtel scored an own goal in the 20th minute. Duncan Alexander, 36, head of U.K. content and customer services for Opta, told his colleague to “run it” —  in other words, to check that Skrtel had just set the league record for most own goals in a season, with four. The stat was confirmed, sent to the broadcasting company Sky, and announced by studio host Jeff Stelling right after the commercial break.Later, Stelling mentioned that Fulham had used 38 players this season, a new record. I asked if that was from Opta. Alexander nodded.These sorts of stats are nice to have, but won’t change the way managers set their lineups or choose tactics. However, the work of Opta and its ilk have brought soccer, very slowly, into the wider statistical revolution in sports. Alexander and Pettitt pointed to the increasing prominence of assists. A decade ago, “some people would refuse to give assists credence,” Alexander said.Opta’s soccer-stats professionals acknowledge their numbers aren’t for everyone. “There will always be fans who, to use a phrase we hear occasionally, say the only stat they care about is the one in the top left-hand corner” — the score, Alexander said. “We’re not zealots. We don’t bang the drum saying, you have to view football the way we do.” read more

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First effects of Hurricane Irma felt in Blue Hills TCI

first_img Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#BlueHills, #HurricaneIrma, #magneticmedianews, #RoadDamages August 30th – One Year since Hurricane Irma named FortisTCI announces bid to hike electricity bills, cites record $42m response to hurricanes as destabilizing Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, September 7th, 2017 – Providenciales– The first signs of Hurricane Irma may have made its way into the Turks and Caicao already as pipeline pressures caused a hole to form in one of the roads in Blue hills.Official reports indicate that the cracked road created a waterspout and sinkholes in the Blue Hills area this morning. However, Magnetic Media understands that persons from the department of public works have been informed and are currently at the scene.This and many other damages are expected to hit the islands of TCI as the category 5 Hurricane travels nearer. According to the Bahamas department of Meteorology, Hurricane Irma will move it ways through Grand Turk, South Caicos then in the direction of Providenciales and West Caicos.Story By: Kay-Marie Fletcher New, stringent posture on illegal construction makes fines, personal demolition and possible deportation legal says PDM Minister, law now passedlast_img read more

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