Protest shows Xi Jinping giving the finger in Paris

first_img China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures ChinaAsia – Pacific March 27, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Protest shows Xi Jinping giving the finger in Paris Organisation to go further Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes Eight-square-metre photomontages showing the Chinese president giving the finger were to have been driven around Paris on five trucks all morning. April 27, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts As Paris rolls out the red carpet for visiting Chinese President Xi Jinping, Reporters Without Borders staged a protest early today to draw attention to the lack of sincerity of Xi and his government about civil liberties, especially freedom of information as enshrined in article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. RSF_en ChinaAsia – Pacific center_img News China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison Help by sharing this information News June 2, 2021 Find out more News News Follow the news on China An interview with Lucie Morillon, Head of ResearchOne truck managed to pass in front of the Eiffel Tower and Arc de Triomphe but the other four were stopped before entering the city. Photos of the photomontage were taken in front of some of Paris’ most emblematic monuments while RWB activists on bicycles, waving banners with a smaller version, completed the procession.The police who stopped the four trucks were unable to provide Reporters Without Borders with grounds for the interception.“It is not right that the authorities took this kind of action to prevent a reference to the situation of freedom of information in China,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Christophe Deloire.The aim of the protest was to highlight the open contempt that the Chinese authorities – led by Xi Jinping, who holds the posts of president of the People’s Republic, Communist Party general secretary and chairman of the Central Military Commission – show for their citizens, denying them freely-reported news and information and subjecting them to constant propaganda. “The disconnect between the official discourse about the Chinese dream and the ruthless persecution of independent journalists shows the degree to which Xi Jinping is making fun of the world,” Deloire said.“Article 35 of China’s constitution says that its citizens enjoy ‘freedom of speech (and) of the press,’ but more than 100 Chinese citizens – professional journalists and netizens – are currently in prison simply for trying to report the country’s reality.”In China, the state media are government propaganda tools, and the propaganda bureau sends more than 1,000 directives a year to all of the country’s journalists. News conferences are stage-managed with bogus journalists asking questions, while an ideological test has just been reintroduced for journalists when they need to renew their press card.The “campaign against rumours” launched by Xi aims to tighten control of the information circulated by Internet users, while improvements continue to be made to the “Electronic Great Wall.” When website filtering and blocking are not enough, the authorities have no compunction about abducting and beating “troublemakers.”With at least 30 journalists and 74 citizen-journalists currently detained, China is the world’s biggest prison for media personnel and netizens. China’s Nobel peace laureate, Liu Xiaobo, is serving an 11-year jail sentence just for defending free speech.China is ranked 175th out of 180 countries in the Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. March 12, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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“Stop The Tears” campaign launched to reduce road carnage

first_imgThe National Road Safety Council of Guyana on Thursday launched the “Stop The Tears” Campaign, an initiative to address and reduce the high percentage of deaths recorded on the roadways.A teardrop logo was officially erected in Kitty, Georgetown.A partnership of Pan American Health Organisation/World Health Organisation (PAHO/WHO), Traffic Department of the Guyana Police Force (GPF); Public Security Ministry, Public Health Ministry, Public Infrastructure Ministry and private sponsors, the efforts are linked to spreading awareness on the importance of practising road safety.“We need to stop the tears. Road safety has become very dormant right now. People are not taking interest. We got to start knowing that this is a serious thing. Road safety is everybody’s business,” said National Road Safety CouncilPAHO/WHO Representative, Dr Paul EdwardsCoordinator Ramona Doergen.PAHO/WHO Representative, Dr Paul Edwards was present during the launch and emphasised on the worldwide impact of road deaths as he stated that the Organisation was pleased at the effort being made.“The theme of this activity reminds us of the importance to adhere to road safety rules if we actually want to stop the tears. Transportation plays a critical and central role in how we live our lives. While use of the road environment is an asset to society by allowing individuals to earn a living or stay connected, exposure can also bring the lift of death or injury to all road users.”The WHO lists road carnage as the ninth leading cause of death across all age ranges from a global standpoint. Additionally, vehicular accidents lead to the loss of over 1.2 million lives and over 50 million non-fatal injuries. Half of the ones who die are pedestrians, motorcyclists and cyclists.“Road traffic crashes are the main causes of death among people aged 15 to 29. In addition to the grief and suffering, road traffic crashes constitute an importantNational Road Safety Council Treasurer Shahab Hackpublic health and development problem with significant health and socio-economic costs,” said Edwards.He added, “Road crashes cost Government between one to three per cent of their gross national product. In Guyana, road accidents are among the leading causes of deaths; the number one cause of death for persons between the ages of five and 14 years and the number two cause of death for persons between the ages of 15 and 24 years.”Deputy Superintendent Dennis Stephen provided statistics which stated that 89 fatal accidents were recorded with a total of about 101 deaths.“One death is enough. What we’re trying to do is to work along with all stakeholders to reduce fatalities on our road,” he stated.last_img read more

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SA miner in world’s top 10: survey

first_img14 January 2013 South Africa-based diversified resources group Exxaro Resources has been named one of the top 10 mining companies worldwide to have delivered the highest total shareholder returns over the 10-year period spanning 2001 to 2011. According to a recent report by the Boston Consulting Group, JSE-listed Exxaro Resources delivered an average return to shareholders of 39.2 percent between 2001 and 2011, placing in seventh out of 34 leading mining companies surveyed. This compared with and average total shareholder returns (TSRs) of 18% for the the global mining industry as a whole between 2001 and 2011. Mexican miner Industrias Penoles was the top value creator over the decade with an average TSR of 58.2%, followed by Grupo Mexico with 49.5% and the UK’s Randgold Resources with 45%. The rest of the top 10 comprisde Canada’s First Quantum Minerals (TSR of 42.7%), China’s Inner Mongolia Yitai Coal (40.2%), US miner Cliffs Natural Resources (40.1%), Exxaro Resources (39.2%), Sociedad Quimaca y Minera de Chile (36.9%), the UK’s Antofagasta (32.4%), and China’s Yanzhou Coal Mining (30.1%). In its report, the Boston Consulting Group calculates TSR as a product of multiple factors, including the combination of revenue growth and change in margins as an indicator of a company’s improvement in fundamental value. It then uses the change in the company’s valuation multiple to determine the impact of investors’ expectations on TSR. Finally, the model tracks the distribution of free cash flow to investors and debt holders in the form of dividends, share repurchases, or repayments of debt in order to determine the contribution of free-cashflow payouts to a company’ TSR. “The mining industry clearly benefitted from the continued economic expansion in emerging markets, which led to steadily rising commodity prices,” the report notes. “Value creation also was fuelled by production growth, margin expansion, and cash returned to equity holders.” Revenue increases attributable to rising commodity prices accounted for nearly 14 of the total 18% TSR that the industry averaged. The remaining 4% was the result of a combination of production gains, margin expansion, and contributions from cash flow. “In every dimension – from profit growth to cash flow contributions to multiple expansion – the top 10 mining companies outperformed the rest of the sample,’ the report states. “Even more impressive was the fact that commodity exposure had no impact on success; the top 10 included a broad range of mineral producers, from gold and copper to coal and industrial-mineral companies. “Furthermore, unlike their industry peers, the top 10 mining companies continued to earn high TSRs during the second half of the decade, the period encompassing the global financial crisis.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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SimpleGeo Debuts Hosted Database for Geolocation Developers

first_imgWhy You Love Online Quizzes klint finley Tags:#hack#Tools Today SimpleGeo‘s hosted spatial database service Storage was released from private beta. This is the flagship product from the company we named as most promising company of 2011. Storage is a hosted version of Apache Cassandra that has been modified to suit the needs of geolocation developers. The goal is to make it as easy as possible for developers to add geolocation features to Web and mobile applications.The service is free for the first 30 days, and will then cost 25 cents per thousand data calls, and 10 cents per thousand records stored.SimpleGeo started as a gaming company back in 2009, but the team quickly realized that the tools they needed didn’t really exist. So the company built them. Storage joins SimpleGeo’s existing serivces Context and Places. Context provides information such as geographic boundaries, weather, and demographics for a specific location. Places provides business listings and points of interest.The company has also worked hard to build a fast and highly scalable infrastructure. During SimpleGeo’s beta testing, 99% of spatial queries are processed in less than 100ms. Last month we posted a talk by Mike Malone, an infrastructure engineer at SimpleGeo, on why and how SimpleGeo built its own Cassandra-based database to handle geolocation data: Related Posts In particular, the company wants to avoid the problems Foursquare has had with availability. Last year, Foursquare had a 11 hour period of downtime. An explanation on the company blog pointed to MongoDB sharding issues. SimpleGeo hopes to avoid these problems by using Cassandra, which is a highly distributed database.Matt Galligan, co-founder and chief strategy office of SimpleGeo, says Storage further differentiates itself from Geo-MongoDB in that it has done away with the use of Z-Trees. He says that Z-Trees are inaccurate and that SimpleGeo employs KD-Trees that allows it to have accurate results ands still scale. How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

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Ronald Koeman backed by Everton board despite poor start to 2017-18 season

first_imgRonald Koeman says he has the full support of Everton’s board despite an underwhelming start to the Premier League campaign.After spending over 100 million pounds in the transfer window, Everton, who finished seventh in the league last season, are 16th with two wins in their opening eight league games and they have yet to record a victory in the Europa League group stage.Koeman believes he has no reason to worry about his job just yet after holding talks with Everton majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri and chairman Bill Kenwright at the club’s training ground.”Yes, he (Moshiri) was here,” Koeman told reporters on Wednesday. “It was not only him but also the chairman… they spoke about football. There was not really a message but the feeling is that they are behind the team and the manager.”Everybody knows in football that’s a nice thing but in football always, finally, it’s all about results. Until now it’s full, total support from the board, yes.”Everton defender Michael Keane reiterated his manager’s words and called for the team to emulate last season’s impressive home form, when they lost just two of their 19 league matches at Goodison Park.”Obviously, we’ve been disappointed not to go out there and win more games for the fans,” Keane said. “The team had a fantastic record at Goodison last season and that was something we wanted to continue.”For one reason or another, that hasn’t happened so far but all we can do is keep working hard to get it right.advertisement”We want to create chances, keep teams pinned in and put teams to the sword. We haven’t done that enough at Goodison yet this year but the fans deserve to see it and we want to give them that.”Everton host French side Olympique Lyon in the Europa League on Thursday and face sixth-placed Arsenal in the league on Sunday.last_img read more

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Why do Women Die in Mali?

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 1, 2011June 20, 2017By: Carolina Damásio, Young Champion of Maternal HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This blog post was contributed by Carolina Damasio, one of the fifteen Young Champions of Maternal Health chosen by Ashoka and the Maternal Health Task Force at EngenderHealth. She will be blogging about her experience every month, and you can learn more about her, the other Young Champions, and the program here.This was the question I asked myself every day since I arrived, working with local health statistics, scientific articles, books, conversations with local experts to find an answer. The responses were all the same: poverty, lack of health professionals, poor access of pre-natal consultations and hospital birth, low educational level and so on. The hard part is knowing that women are not dying because of the untreatable diseases. We already knew long ago how to reduce the “famous” maternal mortalities.Some of these measures are simple… Progress on maternal health is possible! How can we do something for a country that loses one woman every three hours? How do we make society understand what it takes to save their women? The woman is not supposed to suffer or die! Pregnancy should not be a risk! Maternal mortality is an injustice! I wish could do much more…Improve family planning?Training of health professionals?Facilitating access to prenatal care and delivery?A major campaign against malaria?And it was in the midst of these questions that I had the opportunity to work in rural areas of Mali. “If you really want to find out why women are dying, it is necessary to leave the big city,” was the council of many of the people in Bamako who have experience with maternal health. And now I have arranged to start work in small villages.A few days ago I attended a meeting sponsored by Ashoka with the participation of women running projects for other women in rural areas of Bamako. I met some of Mali’s Changemakers, and it was great to make contact with people who are also struggling to make a difference in Mali. I was invited by members of Ashoka to work with pregnant teenagers in the region of Kati. Here some photos of this event.I also had the opportunity to meet Coumba Touré, representative of Ashoka here in Mali. She has an amazing project for children which aims to rescue regional games and children’s stories related to local culture. She is a poet and author of children’s books and she was very interested in my ideas of uniting art with health, and work with the lullabies of the local culture. We talked about the possbility of translating my book (about my project in Brazil, “The Art of Being Born”) to French, making an adaption to the local culture, and perhaps using the poems and stories for children written by her.Share this:last_img read more

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Historic Day For Touch Football

first_img“The women’s match between the Roosters and the Sea Eagles couldn’t be a more fitting curtain-raiser leading into the second match of Saturday between the Roosters and Sea Eagles.” The game will commence at 6:06pm. “Rugby League is moving into our finals series and the Touch Football season has just started. “Tomorrow’s match is a great demonstration of why the new partnership between the NRL and Touch Football Australia works so well,” NRL General Manager League Integration and Game Development, Mr Andrew Hill. The reigning Vawdon Cup champions will play an exhibition match against the Manly Sea Eagles, just a month after the NRL and Touch Football Australia announced an historic sporting partnership representing the biggest boost to participation and game development in the history of either sport.center_img “People can now get involved in our sport all year round. For the first time, women’s Touch Football will be played during an NRL Finals Series with the champion Eastern Suburbs Sydney Roosters taking centre-stage tomorrow during the NRL Telstra Premiership Finals Series double-header at Allianz Stadium. Related LinksWomen’s Game at NRL Finalslast_img read more

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Citizen scientists track radiation seven years after Fukushima

Japanese priest Sadamaru Okano is one of the ‘citizen scientists’ collecting radiation readings in the Fukushima region Safecast now has around 3,000 devices worldwide and data from 90 countries. Its counters come as a kit that volunteers can buy through third parties and assemble at home.Because volunteers choose where they want to measure at random and often overlap, “they validate unknowingly each other’s measurements,” said Franken, and anomalies or exceptions are checked by Safecast staff.The NGO is now expanding into measuring air pollution, initially mostly in the US city of Los Angeles during a test phase.Its radiation data is all open source, and has been used to study everything from the effects of fallout on wildlife to how people move around cities, said Franken.He says Safecast’s data mostly corroborates official measurements, but provides readings that are more relevant to people’s lives.”Our volunteers decide to measure where their schools are, where their workplaces are, where their houses are.”And he believes Safecast has helped push Japan’s government to realise that “transparency and being open are very important to create trust.””The power of citizen science means that you can’t stop it and also that you can’t ignore it.” The machine is sending data to Safecast, an NGO born after the March 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster that says it has now built the world’s largest radiation dataset, thanks to the efforts of citizen scientists like Seirinji’s priest Sadamaru Okano.Like many Japanese, Okano lost faith in the government after the nuclear meltdown seven years ago.”The government didn’t tell us the truth, they didn’t tell us the true measures,” he told AFP, seated inside the 150-year-old temple.Okano was in a better position than most to doubt the government line, having developed an amateur interest in nuclear technology two decades earlier after learning about the Chernobyl disaster.To the bemusement of friends and family, he started measuring local radiation levels in 2007, so when the disaster happened, he had baseline data.”The readings were so high… 50 times higher than natural radiation,” he said of the post-disaster data.”I was amazed… the news was telling us there was nothing, the administration was telling us there was nothing to worry about.”That dearth of trustworthy information was the genesis of Safecast, said co-founder Pieter Franken, who was in Tokyo with his family when the disaster hit.Franken and several friends had the idea of gathering data by attaching Geiger counters to cars and driving around. “Like how Google does Street View, we could do something for radiation in the same way,” he said.”The only problem was that the system to do that didn’t exist and the only way to solve that problem was to go and build it ourselves. So that’s what we did.”Making informed choicesWithin a week, the group had a prototype and began getting readings that suggested the 20 kilometre (12 mile) exclusion zone declared around the Fukushima plant had no basis in the data, Franken said.”Evacuees were sent from areas with lower radiation to areas with higher radiation” in some cases, he said. Forty kilometres away, in the town of Koriyama, Norio Watanabe was supervising patiently as his giggling teenage pupils attempted to build basic versions of Safecast’s Geiger counter.Dressed in blazers and tartan skirts, the girls pored over instructions on where to place diodes and wires.Watanabe has been a Safecast volunteer since 2011, and has a mobile Geiger counter in his car.In the days after the disaster evacuees flocked to Koriyama, which was outside the evacuation zone, and he assumed his town was safe.”But after I started to do the measurements, I realised there was a high level of risk here as well,” he said.’You can’t ignore it’He sent his children away, but stayed behind to look after his mother, a decision he believes may have contributed to his 2015 diagnosis with thyroid cancer.”As a scientist, I think the chance that it was caused by the Fukushima accident might be 50-50, but in my heart, I think it was likely the cause,” he said.His thyroid was removed and he is now healthy, but Watanabe worries about his students, who he fears “will carry risk with them for the rest of their lives.””If there are no people like me who continue to monitor the levels, it will be forgotten.” Explore further © 2018 AFP Beneath the elegant curves of the roof on the Seirinji Buddhist temple in Japan’s Fukushima region hangs an unlikely adornment: a Geiger counter collecting real-time radiation readings. Schoolgirls check an app connected to a geiger counter to measure radiation in a classroom in Fukushima prefecture Citation: ‘Citizen scientists’ track radiation seven years after Fukushima (2018, March 11) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-citizen-scientists-track-years-fukushima.html American praised for getting Japan radiation data Japanese teacher Norio Watanabe work with Safecast to teach his pupils how to measure radiation This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A geiger counter operated by the Safecast group is attached to a fence near the stricken Dai-ichi power plant The zone was eventually redrawn, but for many local residents it was too late to restore trust in the government.Okano evacuated his mother, wife and son while he stayed with his flock.But a year later, based on his own readings and after decontamination efforts, he brought them back.He learned about Safecast’s efforts and in 2013 installed one of their static counters on his temple, in part to help reassure worshippers.”I told them: we are measuring the radiation on a daily basis… so if you access the (Safecast) website you can choose (if you think) it’s safe or not.” read more

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Marine exploration sensing with light and sound

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Oceanic sensor networks that collect and transmit high-quality, real-time data could transform the understanding of marine ecology, improve pollution and disaster management, and inform multiple industries that draw on ocean resources. A KAUST research team is designing and optimizing underwater wireless sensor networks that could vastly improve existing ocean sensing equipment. Explore further “Currently, underwater sensors use acoustic waves to communicate data,” explains Nasir Saeed, who is working on a new hybrid optical-acoustic sensor design with colleagues Abdulkadir Celik, Mohamed Slim Alouini and Tareq Al-Naffouri. “However, while acoustic communication works over long distances, it can only transmit limited amounts of data with long delays. Recent research has also shown that noise created by humans in the oceans adversely affects marine life. We need to develop alternative, energy-efficient sensors that limit noise pollution while generating high-quality data.”One option is to use optical communication technology instead, but light waves will only travel short distances underwater before they are absorbed. Optical sensors also rely heavily on pointing and tracking mechanisms to ensure they are correctly orientated to send and receive signals. The team therefore propose a hybrid sensor capable of transmitting both acoustic and optical signals simultaneously. In this way, a data-collection buoy on the water surface can communicate with every sensor in a network spread out beneath it.However, marine research requires accurate measurements taken from precise locations, so scientists need to know where every sensor is at any given time. The team used mathematical modeling to develop a proof-of-concept localization technique.”Using our technique, the sensors transmit their received signal strength information (RSSI) to the surface buoy,” says Saeed. “For a large communication distance, the sensors use acoustic signals, but if the sensor is within close range of another sensor, it will send an optical signal instead.”Multiple RSSI measurements for each sensor are collected by the surface buoy. The buoy then weights these measurements to give preference to the most accurate readings before calculating where each sensor is positioned.Alouini’s and Al-Naffouri’s teams propose that their sensors will require a new energy source rather than relying on short-term battery power. They envisage an energy-harvesting system that powers fuel cells using microscopic algae or piezoelectric (mechanical stress) energy. Provided by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology KAUST researchers are modeling various techniques for improving wireless underwater sensor networks. For example, new wireless hybrid sensors that use both acoustic and optical communication could improve underwater data collection for ocean observation. Credit: © 2018 Abdulkadir Celik More information: et al, Energy Harvesting Hybrid Acoustic-Optical Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks Localization, Sensors (2017). DOI: 10.3390/s18010051 Underwater sensor successfully tested Citation: Marine exploration sensing with light and sound (2018, March 13) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-marine-exploration.html read more

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