Black woman quits Vermont town board; cites bigotry, safety

first_imgHARTFORD, Vt. (AP) — A Black member of a Vermont town’s selectboard has resigned, citing safety concerns and “blatant bigotry” in the community. The Valley News reports that Alicia Barrow sent a resignation letter to the Hartford selectboard on Friday evening. She wrote that she no longer feels safe nor welcome in a place that she has called home for 15 years. She says she’s been a victim of racial slurs and death threats over the phone, in person and by email. Her resignation comes after the leader of a Vermont NAACP branch stepped down in September, citing harassment, and the lone Black woman in the Legislature resigned in 2018, citing threats.last_img

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Castor Maritime Buys Third Panamax Bulker

first_imgCyprus-based dry bulk shipping company Castor Maritime has acquired its third Panamax dry bulk carrier under an agreement signed on October 14.The company said the purchase price of the Japan-built bulker was USD 10.2 million.It also added that the 2005-built unit is expected to be delivered by the end of the month.The company did not reveal the name of the vessel or its seller, adding only that it was acquired from a third party in which a family member of Castor’s Chairman Petros Panagiotidis has an interest.The latest acquisition brings the total number of vessels in the company’s fleet to three, with this being Castor Maritime’s second ship purchase since it listed on NASDAQ in February 2019.“Consistent with our ambitious growth plan, we remain focused on seeking out future opportunities to expand our fleet in a manner that will be accretive to both our earnings and cash flows,” Petros Panagiotidis, Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer of Castor, commented.last_img read more

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Latest: QPR 1 Leeds United 1

first_imgArmand Traore had a chance to put QPR ahead in the opening seconds of the second half at Loftus Road, where Jermaine Jenas levelled for the home side following a goal from Ross McCormack, who earlier had a penalty saved by Rob Green.McCormack was adjudged to have been fouled by Richard Dunne after latching onto Luke Murphy’s clever pass after 10 minutes, but his resulting spot-kick was easily stopped by the Rangers keeper.However, McCormack found the net with the help of a deflection four minutes later, when his 25-yard free-kick went in via the head of the unfortunate Kevin Doyle.Rangers, beaten in their last three matches, hit back a minute before the interval. Doyle laid the ball off to Jenas, who fired into the bottom corner from inside the penalty the area.And Traore had a clear sight of goal just after the restart but shot straight at keeper Jack Butland.QPR: Green, Hughes, Onuoha, Dunne, Hill, Traore, Jenas, Henry, Hoilett, Morrison, Doyle.Subs: Murphy, Keane, Yun, Carroll, Benayoun, Sendles-White, Maiga.Leeds: Butland, Peltier, Lees, Pearce, Warnock, Murphy, Austin, Stewart, Kebe, Wickham, McCormack.Subs: Smith, Hunt, Mowatt, Byram Wootton, Brown, Cairns.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Video: An Interview with Dr Henry Richter

first_imgRocket scientist Henry Richter describes how he got interested in the requirements for life on “Spacecraft Earth.”Ed. note: CEH will be on break from December 24 through January 1.The new book Spacecraft Earth: A Guide for Passengers just came out last month (see 11/19/17 entry). On the product page, Creation Ministries International (CMI), the publisher, just posted a video clip with Dr Richter and his co-author, David Coppedge, describing the background that led to this book. You can watch it right here:Incidentally, an article on Big Think just gave a surprising announcement, “The Universe Shouldn’t Exist, CERN Scientists Announce.” It’s one of several recent articles emphasizing just how special the earth and universe are, reinforcing Richter’s own findings that “everything that’s here is here because it needs to be to allow life to exist on this earth.” Spacecraft Earth is loaded with many examples of incredible design at all scales. Dr Richter’s own personal story woven throughout the text makes this a unique and winsome book to read and share.While it is too late to have it arrive for Christmas, our interested readers can print the product page, insert it into a Christmas card, and inform a friend or family member that it is on order. You can specify the recipient’s address for shipping.(Visited 500 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Joburg cheapest city for expats

first_imgJohannesburg has beaten 142 countries in a global cost of living survey, making it the cheapest city in the world for expatriates. (Image: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more photos, visit the image library.) Nicky RehbockJohannesburg may be the economic powerhouse of South Africa, but living in the city can be dirt cheap, if you’re an expatriate.This is according to the findings of a recent global survey, which has declared Johannesburg the most affordable city in the world for foreigners.The Cost of Living survey, compiled in March 2009 by consulting and investment firm Mercer, covers 143 cities across six continents and measures the comparative cost of more than 200 items in each location, including housing, transport, food, clothing, household goods and entertainment.It is the world’s most comprehensive living cost survey and has been set up to help multinational companies and governments work out compensation allowances for expat employees.In the survey, New York is used as the base city and scores 100 points. All cities in the poll are then compared against the city, also known as The Big Apple.Topping the charts as the most expensive city is Tokyo, with a score of 143.7 points. Johannesburg is nearly three times cheaper, with a score of 49.6.To put this in perspective, compare the price of a hamburger in the two cities: in Johannesburg you can get one for as little as R20 (US$2.50), while in the Japanese capital you’re looking at the hefty price of R55 ($7) per burger.Osaka was rated the second most expensive city – making Japan the only country with two cities in the top 10. Moscow was third, Geneva fourth and Hong Kong fifth.In 2008 Asunción in Paraguay was rated as the cheapest destination and Moscow the most expensive.Nathalie Constantin-Métral, senior researcher at Mercer, said currency fluctuations, including a stronger dollar, have affected this year’s global rankings.“Many currencies, including the euro and British pound, have weakened considerably against a strong US dollar, causing a number of European cities to plummet in the rankings,” she said.London dropped 13 places from last year to be the 16th most expensive city in the world, while Paris slipped one spot to 13th, according to Mercer.Due to the strengthening dollar, all US cities became more expensive. Los Angeles gained 32 places to 23rd and Washington moved 41 places to 66th.Most European cities became cheaper for expats. Warsaw experienced the most dramatic change, dropping from 35th to 113th place.Expat life also became cheaper in Australia, New Zealand and India. Sydney has dropped from 15th to 66th and Mumbai has slipped from 48th to 66th place.Chinese cities benefited as the yuan strengthened against most other currencies, said Mercer. Shanghai, Shenzhen and Guangzhou moved up to 12th, 22nd and 23rd respectively.Joburg’s rating a boon for tourismJohannesburg’s favourable rating has been welcomed by the local tourism industry.“The news of the influential poll will come as excellent news to Joburg as it gears up for the 2010 Fifa World Cup,” said Tshwane Malope of the Johannesburg Tourism Company.“The city has come a long way over the past decade and is growing a reputation as an events hotspot,” he added.Do you have any queries or comments about this article? Email Nicky Rehbock at [email protected] articlesJoburg’s Xtreme Parks wins goldHost cities for the 2010 Fifa World CupAfrica catches investors’ eyes Useful linksJohannesburg Tourism CompanyMercer Cost of Living survey European Urban Knowledge NetworkEconomist.comExpat Women Bloglast_img read more

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Doctors Without Borders treat Ebola, one patient at a time

first_imgDr Stefan Kruger hugs a survivor in Sierra Leone. (Image: MSF) Sulaiman PhilipIn just the last week the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) estimate of new Ebola infections and deaths has risen. According to Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)) the slow response from the WHO and western governments, and the atmosphere of fear and hysteria, has hampered its ability to slow the spread of the epidemic.But amidst the fear and hysteria there are success stories, MSF’s Dr Stefan Kruger says. The University of Cape Town-educated medic has just returned from a month in Kailahun, the epicentre of Sierra Leone’s Ebola outbreak.“There is one patient that I will always remember, a 70-year-old grandmother. That she survived amazed us all. She was found in her hut, close to death and brought to the hospital. Older people don’t survive usually, but she did. She thrived, helped in the hospital to feed other patients.”Survivors develop antibodies that last at least 10 years; this immunity would make them an asset if they are allowed to return to their villages. This simple piece of information has been lost in the frenzy around the epidemic. “We took her home, embraced her in front of her family and friends. This simple act lifts the stigma of disease from survivors,” says Kruger. Ebola survivor Salome Karawah cares for a 10-month-old baby whose parents are being treated for Ebola. (Image: John Poole) Medics stretched to their limitsKailahun’s 80-bed tin-roofed Ebola complex sits in the hills on the edge of the jungle in north-east Sierra Leone. Once the bustling capital of the Kailahun District, its dirt roads are empty. Residents have left or stay indoors out of fear, and the medical personnel of Kailahun’s government hospital have either been infected or fled.Its 220-member staff of locals and MSF personnel live in a tented compound. Wooden walkways, with tin roofs to keep them raised above the mud churned up in the rainy season, lead to the hospital, the triage tent and, in the distance, a makeshift mortuary.“MSF is doing what it can, but we are being stretched to our limits. For me, going back isn’t a tough decision at all. In many places up to now, if MSF wasn’t there, there would be nothing – for me that’s reason enough” Kruger says.Stopping the spread of the epidemic is not rocket science but the shortage of medical supplies, the slow mobilisation of resources and the lack of information in affected areas combine for the perfect storm. Jens Pedersen, MSF humanitarian affairs advisor, is clear-eyed and rational; “We find ourselves one or two steps behind the spread of the disease because of these factors.” Jens Pedersen hopes that promised aid arrives sooner than later. (Image: MSF)Doctors Without Borders is the most visible medical presence, and often the only foreign medical team, in affected areas. The organisation is still running its malaria, cholera and HIV programmes in tandem with dealing with the outbreak; “We have heard a lot of promises from organisations like the WHO, but there is still no action on the ground,” says Pedersen.Pedersen was based at ELWA3, MSF’s Ebola treatment centre, in Monrovia, Liberia. The 120-bed centre, the largest Ebola treatment centre in the world, is running at capacity and will need to be expanded. On arrival a patient goes through triage where a simple blood test is done. While waiting for the results the patient is quarantined for between 6 and 12 hours in a ward holding other patients. A map of the MSF’s Ebola treatment centre in Monrovia. Click to enlarge (Image: MSF)If the test comes back positive the patient is transferred to a ward holding other confirmed Ebola patients. For most the care is palliative, but those with a chance of survival get supportive treatment as well as nutritional support and rehydration. In Monrovia the recovery rate, for a disease that still has no treatment available, is 40% of all those admitted on time.“Why do some patients survive and others not? It would be speculation on my part but if you get treatment early you are more likely to survive. If you are young, fit and otherwise healthy you are more likely to survive. But this is speculation,” Pedersen emphasises. Slow international aid responses hamper treatment It is estimated that 20 000 medical personnel are needed in Sierra Leone and Liberia alone to stop the epidemic from becoming unmanageable. The United States has sent 4 000 troops to police Ebola hotspots and has promised $400-million in medical supplies. The response of Africa’s trading partners and western nations with advanced health care systems, beyond their hysterical efforts to secure their borders, has been even slower. The Ebola outbreak began almost simultaneously in three West African countries – Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Data from 9 October 2014. (Image: MSF)Cuba, on the other hand, has dispatched Fidel Castro’s “army of white coats” to Sierra Leone. The 165 medical support staff, the largest contingent of medical staff from a single nation, will be followed by 296 Cuban doctors and nurses who will be stationed in Guinea and Liberia. The Cuban Medical Brigade will join MSF’s 250 staff and 3 000 local medical personnel working with Ebola patients in West Africa.Jorge Delgado Bustillo, national coordinator of the Cuban Medical Brigade explained that since the early 60s Cuba has dispatched tens of thousands of health workers to supplement African medical structures and train doctors. “This experience is important, we are comfortable on the ground and language is not a barrier,” he said.Despite shortages of basic medical equipment, MSF is containing the epidemic. Ebola hotspots are centred on areas with crumbling or non-existent healthcare, where things as basic as surgical gloves are in short supply. It is in towns like Kailahun, and Bo, also in Sierra Leone, where the epidemic rages that the expensive equipment used to treat single patients in Madrid and Dallas is needed.“We don’t trust the WHO figure of 4 000 deaths, there is a lot of under-reporting out of fear,” Juli Switala, a paediatrician who has also just returned from Sierra Leone, says. Based in Bo, it was two weeks after her arrival that the first Ebola patients arrived at the hospital. Within a week admissions (of patients with other needs) had dropped to zero. The hysteria that has built up around the epidemic has hindered MSF’s ability to get out clear and effective information. “Fear follows the disease, families are hiding bodies,” she said. The toughest decision Dr Juli Switala has had to make is deciding to stop resuscitating children who have come into contact with Ebola patients. (Image: MSF)Switala has had to make tough decisions in Bo. With her colleagues, they have stopped conducting Caesarean deliveries and no longer resuscitate children. “The risks of contact with body fluids was far too great. We had to make painful touch choices like that every day. The people of Bo are very tactile, they touch your face when they greeted you for example. With Ebola the whole region has become a no touch community.”Patients are isolated from their communities and treated by staff encased in Hazmat suits so personal contact is non-existent. This precaution has affected the care that medical staff are able to give patients; simple medical procedures take two or three times longer than usual.For Switala the 90 minutes spent in the suit every day was, strangely, the least stressful time of the day. She says her mind “was concentrated on doing things safely, being aware of what and who you touched”.“Outside the suit you spent your time wondering who touched your phone, who broke off a piece of bread, who ate from this plate before me.”A breakdown of Ebola deaths A breakdown of Ebola deaths.Click to enlarge.Pedersen believes western hysteria means Africans are being punished for a disease they could do nothing about and did nothing to cause. He talks about a husband brought to hospital in Monrovia by taxi. It was a three-hour journey over rutted roads, his wife watching him getting sicker. The man was so weak that he needed to be carried into the hospital. His wife sat by his side waiting for MSF personnel. “He died there in the courtyard before we could get to him. Imagine the trauma that woman suffered watching her husband die. Now, imagine the response if he had died at a hospital in London instead of Monrovia.”last_img read more

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Trump criticisms spark more protests at NFL games

first_imgView comments MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Read Next Defensive star Von Miller was among the large group of Denver Broncos who took a knee in Buffalo Sunday, where Bills running back LeSean McCoy stretched during the anthem.“We felt like President Trump’s speech was an assault on our most cherished right, freedom of speech,” said Miller, who normally steers clear of politics and social issues.Dozens of more players protested before the Raiders-Redskins game, the final one of the day and not far from the White House in Landover, Maryland. All but a handful of Raiders sat on their bench and seven Redskins took a knee while their teammates stood arm-in-arm along with owner Dan Snyder and president Bruce Allen.In Chicago, the Pittsburgh Steelers stayed in the tunnel except for one player, Army veteran Alejandro Villanueva, who stood outside with a hand over his heart. Both the Seahawks and Titans stayed inside until after the national anthem was over in Nashville, a throwback to the pre-2009 NFL when teams, not the league, set pre-game policy regarding players standing on the sideline for the anthem.A handful of NFL players had been continuing Kaepernick’s protest this season, but that ballooned Sunday following Trump’s two-day weekend rant. It began with the president calling for NFL protesters to be fired and continued Saturday when he rescinded a White House invitation for the NBA champion Golden State Warriors over star Stephen Curry’s criticism.The president’s delving into the NFL protests started by Kaepernickbrought new attention and angered many players who took one insult as a personal attack on their mothers.“Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, you’d say, ‘Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out! He’s fired,’” Trump said to loud applause Friday night at a rally in Huntsville, Alabama.“I’m a son of a queen,” Falcons defensive lineman Grady Jarrett said.Super Bowl MVP Tom Brady was among the New England Patriots who locked arms in solidarity in Foxborough, Massachusetts. Aaron Rodgers did the same with his teammates in Green Bay.“Standing with locked arms is good, kneeling is not acceptable. Bad ratings!” Trump tweeted Sunday. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes PLAY LIST 01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss00:58Trump blames media, Democrats for impeachment during Kentucky rally01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Kenya loses hosting rights to African soccer tournament LATEST STORIES Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Most NFL players on Sunday locked arms with their teammates — some standing, others kneeling — in a show of solidarity. A handful of teams stayed off the field until after “The Star-Spangled Banner” to avoid the issue altogether.As he prepared to board Air Force One to return to Washington from New Jersey, Trump said the players protesting the anthem were “very disrespectful to our country” and called again on owners to stop what he considers unpatriotic displays in America’s most popular sport.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“This has nothing to do with race,” Trump said. “This has to do with respect for our country.”The president’s attack on athletes turned the anthems — usually sung during commercials — into must-watch television shown live by the networks and Yahoo!, which streamed the game in London. In some NFL stadiums, crowds booed or yelled at players to stand. There was also some applause. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa The NFL and its players, often at odds, used Sunday’s anthems to show unity. One of Trump’s biggest supporters in the NFL, Patriots owner Robert Kraft, joined the chorus when he expressed “deep disappointment” with Trump.“I like Bob very much. He’s my friend. He gave me a Super Bowl ring a month ago. So he’s a good friend of mine and I want him to do what he wants to do,” Trump said. “… We have great people representing our country, especially our soldiers our first responders and they should be treated with respect.“And when you get on your knee and you don’t respect the American flag or the anthem.”The protests started more than a year ago when former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick refused to stand during the anthem as a protest of police treatment of minorities. This season, no team has signed him, and some supporters believe NFL owners are avoiding him because of the controversy.A handful of white players didn’t stand Sunday, but the vast majority of those actively protesting were black.ADVERTISEMENT The Pittsburgh Steelers side of the field is nearly empty during the playing of the national anthem before an NFL football game between the Steelers and Chicago Bears, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, in Chicago.President Donald Trump’s criticism of players who kneel during the national anthem sparked angry protests around the National Football League Sunday, as about 200 players sat, knelt or raised their fists in defiance.A week ago, just six players protested.ADVERTISEMENT In Detroit, anthem singer Rico Lavelle took a knee at the word “brave,” lowering his head and raising his right fist. In Nashville, anthem singer Meghan Linsey, took a knee as she finished singing.Jets Chairman and CEO Christopher Johnson, whose brother, Woody, is the ambassador to England and one of Trump’s most ardent supporters, called it “an honor and a privilege to stand arm-in-arm unified with our players during today’s national anthem” in East Rutherford, New Jersey.The issue reverberated across the Atlantic, where about two dozen players took a knee during the playing of the U.S. anthem at Wembley Stadium.“We stand with our brothers,” Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs said. “They have the right and we knelt with them today. To protest, non-violent protest, is as American as it gets, so we knelt with them today to let them know that we’re a unified front.”Jaguars owner Shad Khan and players on both teams who were not kneeling remained locked arm-in-arm throughout the playing of the anthem and “God Save The Queen.” No players knelt during the British anthem.“Me taking a knee doesn’t change the fact that I support our military, I’m a patriot and I love my country,” Bills linebacker Lorenzo Alexander said. “But I also recognize there are some social injustices in this country and today I wanted to take a knee in support of my brothers who have been doing it.”Alexander said he’ll go back to standing for the anthem next week.“I just wanted to show them that I was with them today, especially in the backdrop of our president making the comments about our players, about their mothers,” Alexander said. “And then you put that in conjunction with how he tried to gray-area Nazism and KKK members as being fine people, I had to take a knee.”The National Hockey League’s reigning champion Pittsburgh Penguins announced Sunday they’ve accepted a White House invitation from Trump. The Penguins said they respect the office of the president and “the long tradition of championship team visiting the White House.”Before Game 1 of the WNBA Finals in Minneapolis on Sunday, the Los Angeles Sparks left the floor while the Minnesota Lynx stood arm-in-arm. The Sparks returned to a chorus of boos when the song was finished. Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Trump also mocked the league’s crackdown on illegal hits, suggesting the league had softened because of its safety initiatives.Kahn, who was among the NFL owners who chipped in $1 million to the Trump inauguration committee, said he met with his team captains before kickoff in London “to express my support for them, all NFL players and the league following the divisive and contentious remarks made by President Trump.”Among the strongest criticisms of the president Sunday was this from Saints coach Sean Payton: “I’m disappointed in the comments that were made. I think we need a little bit more wisdom in that office,” he said of the White House. “I want that guy to be one of the smarter guys in the room and it seems like every time he’s opening up his mouth it’s something that is dividing our country and not pulling us together.”last_img read more

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NFL: Message being lost in political firestorm over anthem

first_imgLacson: PH lost about P161.5B tax revenue from big trading partners in 2017 PLAY LIST 03:46Lacson: PH lost about P161.5B tax revenue from big trading partners in 201700:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City LATEST STORIES Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Varios jugadores de los Browns de Cleveland se arrodillan al escuchar el himno nacional de Estados Unidos en un partido de la NFL ante los Colts de Indianápolis, el domngo 24 de septiembre de 2017 (AP Foto/Michael Conroy, archivo)NEW YORK — The NFL says the message players and teams are trying to express is being lost in a political firestorm.The issues have been “overtaken by political forces,” NFL spokesman Joe Lockhart said Thursday, referring to President Trump’s criticism of the league, team owners and players for kneeling during the national anthem.ADVERTISEMENT BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight More than 200 players either knelt or used other means as expressions of unity last weekend. Lockhart said such actions are not a protest against the anthem or the flag.“One of the impacts is to distort the views of the NFL and particularly our players,” Lockhart said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutTrump said NFL owners fear their players, and he renewed calls for action against those who kneel duringthe anthem.“I think they are afraid of their players, if you want to know the truth, and I think it’s disgraceful,” he said in an interview that aired Thursday on “Fox and Friends.” He says “most people agree” with him. Silver expects NBA players to stand during national anthem Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  On Thursday, Tennessee Titans tight end Delanie Walker said he and his family have received death threats since he told fans not to come to games if they felt disrespected by NFL players’ protests. The Pro Bowl tight end shared the “heartbreaking” threats in a social media post.“The racist and violent words directed at me and my son only serve as another reminder that our country remains divided and full of hateful rhetoric,” Walker wrote. “These words of hate will only fuel me in my efforts to continue my work reaching out to different community groups, listening to opposing voices, and honoring the men and women in the Armed Forces who risk their lives every day so that we may have this dialogue.”Detroit Lions defensive tackle Akeem Spence said on Twitter earlier Thursday that his father, a contractor, was denied a job on a house because of his protest. LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary MOST READ Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC The players knelt last weekend in response to social injustice. Full teams, along with some team owners, linked arms either before or during the anthem. Three teams — Pittsburgh, Seattle and Tennessee — did not take the field until after the anthem.“They are under attack now and the (original) lesson has been forgotten,” Lockhart said. “It is important for everyone to understand what they are talking about, to not see everything in terms of who is up or down politically.“The NFL players are men of character, many of whom are leaders in their community. They are patriotic, support the military. … They understand their platform can be used to make the country a better place.”Lockhart insisted there will be no “leaguewide directive” for future demonstrations.“This is an issue that should involve the owners of the 32 clubs, the coaches and players to work out together,” he said. “There is very regular dialogue going on between the players, coaches and owners. This is an issue that has sort of gripped the headlines. We all care very deeply about this.“All of our owners don’t always agree with even each other, and the players often have a position at odds with the league, and we work hard to resolve those,” he added. “We have been united on this issue. They are all pulling in the same direction, but we understand each locker room is different.”ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

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