Reporters Without Borders urges Commonwealth Secretary-General Don McKinnon to intervene on behalf of jailed journalists

first_img News News PakistanAsia – Pacific News June 2, 2021 Find out more to go further Pakistani supreme court acquits main suspect in Daniel Pearl murder Receive email alerts Organisation Follow the news on Pakistan Pakistani journalist critical of the military wounded by gunfirecenter_img News PakistanAsia – Pacific Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists RSF_en Help by sharing this information January 28, 2021 Find out more May 25, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Reporters Without Borders urges Commonwealth Secretary-General Don McKinnon to intervene on behalf of jailed journalists Reporters Without Borders (Reporters sans frontières) is calling on Commonwealth Secretary-General Don McKinnon, to intervene with Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf and Prime Minister Mir Zafarullah Khan Jamali on behalf of four jailed journalists.The call follows the Commonwealth’s 22 May decision to re-admit Pakistan, five years after it was suspended following the military coup that brought General Musharraf to power in 1999.The organisation pointed out that press freedom violations have increased in recent months. It hoped that Pakistan’s re-entry to the Commonwealth could lead to real human rights improvements, particularly the release of journalists behind bars, along with the acquittal of Khawar Mehdi Rizvi, who is at risk of a life sentence.The Pakistani authorities have secretly held Sami Yousafzai, of the US magazine Newsweek, since 21 April 2004. The authorities have not confirmed his arrest and there is still no news of his taxi driver, Mohamed Salim. Reporters Without Borders fears that Sami Yousafzai could be tried under the special Frontier Crimes Regulations, under which he is unlikely to get a fair trial.Former letters page editor on The Frontier Post, Munawar Mohsin, was sentenced to life imprisonment by the High Court in the North West Frontier Province (NWFP) on 8 July 2003, for “selecting” and “publishing” a letter that allegedly insulted the Prophet Muhammad and was therefore blasphemous and a violation of the criminal code. Mohsin was arrested in Peshawar on 29 January 2001, the same day that the offending letter appeared in the newspaper, signed by someone identified as Ben Dzec.On 12 August 2003, Rasheed Azam, journalist on local publications Intikhab and Asap and a human rights activist in south-western Baluchistan province was arrested for distributing posters showing a soldier beating young demonstrators. During the police investigation, reference was also made to his articles criticising federal policy towards Baluchistan and he was reportedly beaten in the course of interrogation sessions.Since April 1999, Rehmat Shah Afridi, former editor of the dailies The Frontier Post and Maidan, has been held in harsh conditions. He was sentenced to death in June 2001, for “drug-trafficking and possession”. He has always proclaimed his innocence. The Lahore High Court on 20 May 2004 condemned police destruction of key material evidence under which Afridi was convicted, confirming that the journalist was the victim of Anti-Narcotics Force (ANF) revenge for his exposure of the US-financed body’s abuse of power and corruption. He was tortured following his arrest and placed in the death row in Kot Lakhpat prison in Lahore (in Punjab province). Until recently, he was never let out of his cell and had no mattress.Another Pakistani journalist, Khawar Mehdi Rizvi, who worked for the French weekly L’Express, was held in secret by the military for several weeks. He was released from prison in Quetta on 29 March 2004 by order of the local anti-terrorist court, though he will be on bail and must still appear in court to face charges of “conspiracy” and “sedition.” He was arrested with two journalists on 16 December 2003 in Karachi just after completing a report on Taliban groups at the border with Afghanistan.Reporters Without Borders has also sent the top Commonwealth official a copy of the Pakistan chapter of its 2003 annual report, that details 12 arrests, 27 assaults and at least six threats against journalists. The organisation did also highlight some improvements, particularly the emergence in Pakistan of private television channels. April 21, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Press Conference of Hockey Union in B&H

first_imgThe B&H hockey team will play a friendly match against the Turkish team in the Olympic hall Zetra next Saturday.A press conference will be held on this occasion at the VIP lounge hall “Zetra” tomorrow at 11:00, announced the B&H Hockey Union.The coach of the B&H hockey team Anthony London will announce at the press conference the list of players and the plan of preparations of the B&H team.(Source: Fena)last_img

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F1 legend Bernie Ecclestone claims black people ‘more racist’ than whites

first_imgImage Courtesy: Sky Sports/CNNAdvertisement cd4mNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs0x6gWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Eefp4( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 4za1bWould you ever consider trying this?😱tg3mbCan your students do this? 🌚ndyRoller skating! Powered by Firework The death of George Floyd has catalysed a massive anti-racism campaign across the world, with protests happening in many countries, and many iconic faces from the global sports fraternity coming forward in support of equality, and some have even shared their own account of experiencing racism in their career. However, former chief executive of the Formula One Group and F1 driver Bernie Ecclestone is now the centre of controversy, as the veteran’s recent statement of finding black people ‘more racist’ than whites, has been spewing reprimand towards him.Advertisement Image Courtesy: Sky Sports/CNNRecently, Formula 1 icon Lewis Hamilton decided to launch ‘The Hamilton Commission’, an initiative to increase diversity in the Motorsport scene and to encourage more black youngsters to join the industry.However, the initiative was something that Ecclestone is dubious about, as he feels the initiative will not bring about any major changes in Formula 1.Advertisement “Lewis is a little bit special,” although Ecclestone hailed the six time World Champion during his interview with CNN, he expressed hesitation regarding the Hamilton Commission.“I don’t think it’s going to do anything bad or good for Formula One,” the F1 Supremo continued, “it’ll just make people think which is more important. I think that’s the same for everybody.Advertisement “People ought to think a little bit and think: ‘Well, what the hell. Somebody’s not the same as white people and black people should think the same about white people’,” Ecclestone added.However, it was what the veteran Brit said afterwards that has been making headlines all around.“In lots of cases, Black people are more racist than what White people are,” the 89 year old concluded.The controversial statement is earning Ecclestone criticism all around, and Formula One themselves have rejected their former chief’s statement.“At a time when unity is needed to tackle racism and inequality, we completely disagree with Bernie Ecclestone’s comments that have no place in Formula 1 or society,” an official statement from F1 read.“Mr Ecclestone has played no role in Formula 1 since he left our organisation in 2017, his title Chairman Emeritus, being honorific, expired in January 2020,” the statement added.Regarding the statement, Hamilton himself has retaliated at Ecclestone.“Bernie is out of the sport and of a different generation but this is exactly what is wrong – ignorant and uneducated comments which show how far we as a society need to go before real equality can happen,” the 35 year old wrote in his Instagram story.Image Courtesy: Instagram(@lewishamilton)If you like reading about MMA, make sure you check out MMAIndia.com Also follow India’s biggest arm wrestling tournament at ProPanja.comAlso read-Positive, Negative, Positive – Mohammad Hafeez’s Covid-19 conundrumAniket Jadhav exclusive: “It’s always a unique feeling when you are representing your country.” Advertisementlast_img read more

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NJSIAA Keeps Hope Alive for a Spring High School Sports Season

first_imgCoaches may interact virtually with their student-athletes, including providing workouts or training materials. However, such virtual contact – as well as any activity that may result from it – must strictly conform to all directives in effect related to the coronavirus out- break and social distancing guidelines. In addition, any virtual contact and resultant activities must be entirely in keeping with all NJSIAA in-and off-season protocols. With the doors shut on high schools, the spring sports season is on hold. Many athletes and coaches fear there could be no sports played for the remainder of the school year, but the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJ-SIAA) is keeping the door open to the possibility of some sort of spring sports season, if schools reopen. The NJSIAA executive committee held a teleconference April 1 and released the following statement: No, the NJSIAA Scholar Athlete Luncheon, originally scheduled for Sunday, May 17, has been canceled. NJSIAA is continuing to solicit nominations from each member school and will send each honoree a certificate and gift. Monetary scholarships, however, will not be awarded this year. While the return-to-school date will play a significant role in determining the length of the regular season, NJSIAA staff will also discuss options with officers of each league and conference. Important factors in determining the potential length of the regular season will be feedback from these officers related to the status of various county or conference tournaments, as well as plans for abridged divisional and/or inter-con-ference schedules. By Rich Chrampanis What is the status of NJ-SIAA championship tournaments? Here are the NJSIAA’s answers to some frequently asked questions, as of March 25: This article originally appeared in the April 2nd, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. During the governor’s statewide shutdown of all schools, no practices, scrimmages, or games may be held. This includes any event organized by a parent, captain, or other student-athlete. RICH CHRAMPANIS Pitcher Shane Panzini looked to lead RBC as the defending Shore Conference champions. All spring sports are side- lined during the quarantine from the coronavirus pandemic center_img No, during the governor’s statewide shutdown of all schools, no NJSIAA member school, school district, or coach may conduct practices, scrimmages, or games (which includes all official interscholastic contests). This is a mandatory period of no in-person contact between coaches and their student-athletes. Are coaches allowedto have in-person contactwith student-athletes whileschools are shut down? When schools are able toreopen, how will NJSIAAdetermine the length of theregular season? “While a return-to-school date and related public health guidelines will determine the viability of a spring sports season, NJSIAA is committed to doing whatever is possible to provide New Jersey’s student-athletes with some type of spring season. We have not given up on spring sports and will continue holding teleconferences and virtual meetings with leaders of our various leagues and conferences to assess options. To be clear, any effort to arrange for scholastic competition outside the traditional academic calendar would require support and approval beyond our office.” As stated in the previous FAQ, all dates, locations and qualification requirements per each sport’s tournament will be subject to change. As soon as a return-to-school date is made official, NJ-SIAA staff will work directly with key tournament staff for each sport to structure championship tournaments. Also, NJSIAA staff will work together to ensure that all sports will, as much as is feasible, provide consistent opportunities for participation and championship play. These restrictions are in place to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in accordance with restrictions imposed by the governor and recommended by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the New Jersey Department of Health. These restrictions relate to all sports, not just spring sports. Will NJSIAA host its annual Scholar Athlete Luncheon? last_img read more

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Why do Women Die in Mali?

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 1, 2011June 20, 2017By: Carolina Damásio, Young Champion of Maternal HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This blog post was contributed by Carolina Damasio, one of the fifteen Young Champions of Maternal Health chosen by Ashoka and the Maternal Health Task Force at EngenderHealth. She will be blogging about her experience every month, and you can learn more about her, the other Young Champions, and the program here.This was the question I asked myself every day since I arrived, working with local health statistics, scientific articles, books, conversations with local experts to find an answer. The responses were all the same: poverty, lack of health professionals, poor access of pre-natal consultations and hospital birth, low educational level and so on. The hard part is knowing that women are not dying because of the untreatable diseases. We already knew long ago how to reduce the “famous” maternal mortalities.Some of these measures are simple… Progress on maternal health is possible! How can we do something for a country that loses one woman every three hours? How do we make society understand what it takes to save their women? The woman is not supposed to suffer or die! Pregnancy should not be a risk! Maternal mortality is an injustice! I wish could do much more…Improve family planning?Training of health professionals?Facilitating access to prenatal care and delivery?A major campaign against malaria?And it was in the midst of these questions that I had the opportunity to work in rural areas of Mali. “If you really want to find out why women are dying, it is necessary to leave the big city,” was the council of many of the people in Bamako who have experience with maternal health. And now I have arranged to start work in small villages.A few days ago I attended a meeting sponsored by Ashoka with the participation of women running projects for other women in rural areas of Bamako. I met some of Mali’s Changemakers, and it was great to make contact with people who are also struggling to make a difference in Mali. I was invited by members of Ashoka to work with pregnant teenagers in the region of Kati. Here some photos of this event.I also had the opportunity to meet Coumba Touré, representative of Ashoka here in Mali. She has an amazing project for children which aims to rescue regional games and children’s stories related to local culture. She is a poet and author of children’s books and she was very interested in my ideas of uniting art with health, and work with the lullabies of the local culture. We talked about the possbility of translating my book (about my project in Brazil, “The Art of Being Born”) to French, making an adaption to the local culture, and perhaps using the poems and stories for children written by her.Share this:last_img read more

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Killing Them Softly Promotion

first_imgThanks to our friends at Hoyts Distribution, Touch Football Australia has 10 double passes to give away to see the new Brad Pitt film ‘Killing Them Softly’, which is only at the movies from Thursday, 11 October. When their illegal card game is held up, and the life blood of the criminal economy is on the verge of collapse, the mafia calls in enforcer Jackie Cogan (Brad Pitt) to fix the situation. Navigating between his indecisive crime bosses and the dim witted lowlifes behind the heist, Cogan moves to restore order, and protect his interests before the situation spirals out of control.For your chance to win a double pass, either ‘like’ us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter and tell us why you’d like to see this film. The best 10 answers will receive a double pass and TFA will be in contact with you if you are a winner. Please click on the links below to be directed to our social media pages:www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustraliawww.twitter.com/touchfootyaus Related LinksKilling Them Softlylast_img read more

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10 months agoDONE DEAL: Leicester midfielder Iborra says ‘right time’ to join Villarreal

first_imgDONE DEAL: Leicester midfielder Iborra says ‘right time’ to join Villarrealby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester midfielder Vicente Iborra has joined Spanish side Villarreal for an undisclosed fee.The 30-year-old Spaniard joined the Foxes from Sevilla in July 2017 after winning the Europa League three times.Iborra made 37 appearances, scoring four goals, but started only three league games this season. “We feel that it’s time to come back home,” he said. “I’ve felt privileged for wearing this jersey and playing beside these great supporters. “You made me feel one of yours, thanks from my heart for your unconditional support.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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Ghosns legal woes highlight governance failings in Japan

first_imgTOKYO — One of the biggest mysteries surrounding the arrest of Nissan’s former chairman Carlos Ghosn is over how he allegedly could have underreported his income by millions of dollars for years and why the company is going after the suspected wrongdoing now.Ghosn, who headed the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Motors auto alliance, was arrested Nov. 19 on suspicion he underreported his income by $44 million over five years, or about half of what he was really making. Nissan Motor Co. and Mitsubishi have ousted him as chairman; the board of Renault SA of France says it’s waiting for more evidence.Nissan is among a growing list of top-name Japanese companies whose corporate governance has been found lacking in recent years.“Wait a minute. Who wrote the financial statements? The accountants. Who audited them? The auditors,” Christopher Richter, auto analyst for CLSA Securities Japan Co., said of the case. “How do you do this without other people being complicit?”Japanese prosecutors say Ghosn and another Nissan executive, Greg Kelly, an American suspected of collaborating with him, were arrested because they are considered flight risks. But the timing of the scandal, given the length and scale of the alleged wrongdoing, is raising questions.Why did Nissan choose to come forward now, asks Eric Schiffer, chief executive of Reputation Management Consultants in the Los Angeles, California, area.“If Nissan knew about this all along and decided to pull the trigger, such Machiavellian tactics will significantly backfire on the brand,” Schiffer said.Japanese media have reported that two other company employees contacted authorities as whistleblowers and sought plea deals. Ghosn has not made any public statements about the case.Kelly’s American lawyer Aubrey Harwell said his client, who was dismissed as a Nissan executive director after his arrest, did nothing wrong.Kelly acted “according to the law and according to company policy,” Hartwell said. “He had talked to people in the company and to outsiders, and he believed everything he did was done totally legally,” he said in a telephone interview from his office in Nashville, Tennessee.Only Ghosn’s attorneys and embassy officials from Lebanon, France and Brazil, where he has citizenship, are allowed to visit him. On Monday, Imad Ajami, a Lebanese consultant in Tokyo who has spoken with people allowed to visit Ghosn, said he also was asserting his innocence.Ajami said Ghosn’s visitors have bought him a mattress, clothing, cheese and other foods to make his stay under the frugal conditions in the detention centre more comfortable. Detainees usually sleep on straw tatami mats and are fed mostly rice, soup and vegetables.Prosecutors have released very little information about the case and neither man has been officially charged. In Japan suspects can be held for weeks for questioning without any charges.A source familiar with an internal investigation by Nissan said the hidden salary was categorized as “deferred income,” meaning it was promised for later on, such as after Ghosn’s retirement, and the documents promising the money were kept secret from auditors and others. He spoke on condition of anonymity as he was not authorized to discuss such details.One possible motive is that Ghosn was seeking to avoid public criticism over his multi-million dollar paychecks, which are a rarity in Japan even for top executives. Even the underreported amounts, about 1 billion yen ($9 million) each year, drew unwelcome scrutiny and commentary.Ghosn was forced to defend his salary at shareholders’ meetings beginning in 2010, when Japan started requiring the disclosure of individual executive pay.Pay packages in the west tend to be higher — Toyota Motor Corp.’s Chief Executive Akio Toyoda earns less than 400 million yen ($3.5 million) a year. But many Japanese companies lack the sorts of systematic checks required for publicly listed U.S. companies. That includes periodically changing who checks financial statements instead of having the same people do it for many years.Japan needs independent oversight for executive pay, said corporate governance expert Takuji Saito, who teaches at Keio Business School.“The problem here was that the pay was significant, in line with global standards, but the way it was decided was still so Japanese,” he said of Nissan’s lack of transparency. “Nissan deserves criticism for having allowed this to continue unchecked for so long.”Saito believes that failing to report deferred income is still “a grey area in criminality” in Japan, but a clear problem in corporate governance.It’s certainly turned out to be a big problem for Ghosn, 64. He’s being held at a Tokyo detention centre pending his indictment or release and has hired Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP to represent him.Japanese media say, without citing sources, that Ghosn is asserting his innocence, insisting he always wanted his income reports to be legal and denying he signed secret documents. Prosecutors have refused to comment.Whether a suspect intended to commit a crime or did it unknowingly is important in determining criminality under Japanese law.Nissan veteran Hiroto Saikawa, who took over from Ghosn as the automaker’s chief executive last year, has harshly criticized his former boss and vowed to instil greater transparency and accountability at Nissan. The company is setting up a panel of outsiders to come up with recommendations, including reviewing the company’s executive compensation system.The raft of scandals at many blue chip Japanese companies suggests managers are struggling to meet sometimes overly ambitious profit targets amid slowing demand, labour shortages, rising costs and intensifying competition. But they also highlight a rift between old-guard practices and an increasingly global business world in Japan.— Major steelmaker Kobe Steel was charged with violating competition laws after massive faking over many years of quality data for products sent to hundreds of companies, including aluminum castings and copper tubes for autos, aircraft, nuclear power plants, appliances and trains. Kobe Steel said a zealous pursuit of profit, unrealistic targets and an insular corporate culture caused the wrongdoing.— In 2016, Mitsubishi Motors Corp. disclosed it falsified mileage data. That followed a massive coverup over decades of auto defects thought to have helped cause a fatal accident. In 2004 its president, Katsuhiko Kawasoe, was arrested. He was sentenced to three years in prison, suspended for five years, and did not serve time in jail.— In 2015, electronics maker Toshiba Corp. said it had doctored its books in a systematic accounting coverup that began in 2008 or earlier. The company declared bankruptcy, stricken by troubles in its nuclear business after multiple meltdowns in March 2011 at a power plant in Fukushima, northeastern Japan.— Beginning in 2014, auto parts supplier Takata Corp. recalled more than 100 million defective air-bag inflators linked to 25 deaths and more than 180 injuries worldwide. Last year, Takata pleaded guilty to fraud in a U.S. court and agreed to pay more than $1 billion (109 billion yen) in penalties.These scandals and more, from faked data to cutting corners, have driven calls for stricter corporate oversight. Reflecting widespread sentiments, Schiffer, the brand management expert, says he finds it hard to believe Nissan insiders weren’t aware of what was going on earlier.Otherwise, they were “incompetent,” he said.___Yuri Kageyama is on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyamaOn Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/yurikageyama/?hl=enYuri Kageyama, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Raf Simons leaves Calvin Klein over creative differences

first_imgNEW YORK — Less than two years after he shook up the New York fashion world with a splashy debut for Calvin Klein, designer Raf Simons is leaving the company.In a joint announcement, the company and the Belgian designer said they were parting ways amicably after Calvin Klein “decided on a new brand direction different from Simons’ creative vision.” A representative for Simons said in an email Friday night that the designer would have no further comment.Simons revitalized Calvin Klein with his hip European sensibility after being appointed chief creative officer in 2016. His New York Fashion Week shows were the talk of the industry, beginning with his February 2017 debut, which had a clear political message, opening and closing with the David Bowie song “This is Not America.”Celebrities flocked to his shows, critics raved, and the fashion establishment rewarded him with three top awards in two years. He won the Council of Fashion Designers of America award for womenswear in both 2017 and 2018, and in a rare feat also took the menswear award in 2017.But critical raves don’t necessarily translate to commercial success. There was reportedly disappointment on the part of PVH, the corporation that owns Calvin Klein, in sales under Simons.Simons, who previously worked at Dior, brought an artsy European approach to the iconic American brand, often citing numerous cultural references — but especially Hollywood — as inspirations. In September, his runway show riffed on the movie “Jaws,” with models in various types of wetsuits strolling in front of enormous screens depicting a glistening ocean.Many of the garments had big bites taken out of them — as in shark bites. Simons said the shark represented danger.“Very often we are attracted to things that we actually know are dangerous,” he said in an interview. “But we can’t stay away from it.”Some of models wore tasseled caps and robes; Simons was also riffing on “The Graduate.”At his show last February, Simons coated the former American Stock Exchange Building in downtown Manhattan with a huge bed of popcorn. Guests slogged through the kernels to get to their seats, with bits of popcorn falling into boots and shoes and coating one’s clothes with powder.It was Simons’ version of an American landscape, including a huge barn house. But the clothes evoked not so much rural America as a dystopian world on another planet, with balaclavas, huge gloves, and bits of Mylar flowing from the garments.As was typical, that show was attended by a slew of celebrities including Nicole Kidman, Margot Robbie, Laura Dern, and — straight from a premiere party — the cast of “The Black Panther,” including Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o and Chadwick Boseman.Calvin Klein will not show during New York Fashion Week in February 2019. No word was given about a successor.Jocelyn Noveck, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Smoking light ballast causes evacuation at Peace Villa

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – An overheating light ballast caused officials to evacuate Peace Villa for a short time this morning.Deputy Fire Chief Darrell Blades with the Fort St. John Fire Department said that firefighters were called out to Peace Villa shortly before 7:30 Friday morning. He said that an overheating light ballast began emitting smoke, setting off the building’s fire alarms.Residents of Peace Villa seen during this morning’s evacuation. Submitted photo. Blades said that Peace Villa was evacuated while firefighters went inside to investigate. He said that apart from a minor amount of smoke, there was no extension of fire, and the facility’s residents and staff were allowed to return inside after about ten minutes. No one was injured.last_img

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