Capitol losses

first_imgThree weeks after a mob of Trump supporters and white supremacists broke into the Capitol to protest Congress’ formal counting of the Electoral College votes, a Harvard panel of experts soberly reflected on the critical damage done to democracy and the arduous work ahead to figure out how to save it.The toll of the Jan. 6 riot that left five people dead and 140 police officers injured is still being measured, but faculty across the University gave a stark assessment of the harm done to the country’s foundation by both insurrectionists and politicians.At a virtual gathering titled “The Events of January 6 and the Future of American Democracy,” Erica Chenoweth, Berthold Beitz Professor in Human Rights and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School and Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, compared the attempted coup to Adolf Hitler’s failed takeover in Bavaria in 1923 and the seeding of anti-government conspiracy that followed. She castigated the people in Congress who perpetuated the false claim that the election had been stolen from former President Donald Trump even after the insurrection.“l don’t want to be accused of being overly alarmist at any point, but there are historical examples we can avoid if we take very seriously this pattern of behavior and stand up for the truth, and absolutely reject people who are in power and authority and who want to challenge and destroy the truth. We should have our elected officials standing up for the rule of law or demanding that they resign,” she said.Daniel Ziblatt, Eaton Professor of the Science of Government and co-author of “How Democracies Die,” called the riot “remarkable and consequential,” despite data that shows an established, wealthy democracy like the U.S. should be safe from breaking down.“That should be reassuring, but if any of you are like me, it’s not entirely reassuring,” he said. “The point here, though, is one of the key hinges: What happens with the Republican Party? We have a two-party system. If one of the parties doesn’t behave in ways that respect the basic rules of the democratic game, it’s really hard to imagine this lasting very long.” “It’s a difficult thing when a demagogue hijacks your party. It is true that, on the one hand, Republicans enabled Donald Trump but, on the other hand, he enabled them.” — Harvey Mansfield New approach focuses on cognitive, emotional traits of the radicalized Psychologist suggests starting with asking them what they think, feel Bacow, Harvard faculty, students call for affirmation of American principles Scholars reflect on how to maintain access to nation’s symbols of democracy How to talk to your kids about the Capitol riots Concern over storming of the Capitolcenter_img The panel gathered as part of the Office for the Vice Provost’s Socialize Remotely series. In the 90-minute webinar moderated by Ryan D. Enos, professor of government and faculty associate in the Institute for Quantitative Social Science; Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Claudine Gay; Harvey Mansfield, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Government; and Richard Fallon, Story Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and an affiliate professor in government, also spoke in grave terms about what led to the riot and theorized about what it will take for country to move forward.Fallon said that the outdated Electoral College voting system is a hindrance to democracy, and, “There’s not as much help coming from the Constitution as you might hope for.“If we escaped disaster on Jan. 6, it is not because the structures of democracy that the Constitution creates provide anything like a failsafe. To the contrary, many aspects of our system are ill-designed to meet current challenges. Right now our political culture is in shambles, but if our future is to be rescued, the rescues will have to come through the reform of our politic that the Constitution does not require and in some cases may inhibit,” he said.Gay offered a positive view of the power of an expanding electorate that “demands to be represented in government.” She noted the record turnout for the presidential election, 67 percent, was the highest in more than 120 years, and that 76,000 new voters registered in Georgia for the Senate election runoff after Election Day.“This was not magic, but rather the culmination of years of really deep organizing and grassroots mobilization by advocacy groups such as the New Georgia Project, which registered more than 500,000 in just the last six years,” she said. “As I look ahead, that’s the dynamic that gives me hope. Our democracy — however imperfect, which it is — I firmly believe is made better the more we all participate.”In his remarks, Mansfield classified Trump as a demagogue whose vulgarity and coarseness appeal to the worst instincts of “followers more interesting to study than him,” and explained the GOP’s inability to break from him this way:“It’s a difficult thing when a demagogue hijacks your party. It is true that, on the one hand, Republicans enabled Donald Trump but, on the other hand, he enabled them. He wasn’t able to make deals with Democrats and Republicans because, from the beginning, he faced a mode of resistance. He was, therefore, constrained to follow a policy program of pretty normal Republican things — tax cuts, deregulation, somewhat stronger foreign policy,” he said. Related What prompted Capitol rioters to violence? Securing public spaces in the wake of Capitol violence But the GOP enabling, compounded by media that continues to advance false election narratives, left Gay “to confess that so much of what is unfolding right now goes so far beyond what scholars of American politics are used to talking about.”“It’s not just about the outrage of trying to throw out millions of legally cast ballots. … It’s using what were previously innocuous and procedural milestones in the election certification process as now strategic choke points,” she said. “I wish I had a more optimistic view on that particular issue, but it says something that demonstrably false claims meant to undermine public trust in our electoral process and rejected by nearly 60 courts are still being treated as political perspectives that are worth defending. This isn’t ordinary political and policy disagreement.”In her closing response to Enos’ final question to the group — what actions can be taken? — she said (and Mansfield echoed): “Vote.” Both Fallon and Chenoweth, whose new book, “Civil Resistance: What Everyone Needs to Know,” publishes next month, recommended engaging in local politics. Ziblatt gave a nod to the many who engaged in the political process as part of their jobs.“The thing that really saved us, if not our checks and balances, were people doing their jobs … journalists, civil servants, military officers, Capitol Hill police officers, abiding by professional ethics,” he said. “It turns out that’s the thing that really helps save our democracy.”last_img read more

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5 career mistakes you can recover from

first_imgby: Sienna BeardSometimes even a small mistake can feel like a disaster when it comes to your career. While certain mistakes can be detrimental to your job search (such as having typos in your resume or making your resume too long), there are many mistakes that seem catastrophic at the time but can actually teach you something. While telling off an important CEO with hundreds of connections could seriously endanger your future career, messing up in an interview probably won’t. Many mistakes can actually be helpful if you choose to learn from them and do better in the future instead of focusing on your past errors. No one can navigate through all of the necessary hoops that are involved in moving up the corporate ladder without making a few mistakes; you just need to use them to come back bigger and better. Here are five mistakes you can learn from.1. Bombing an interviewIt’s never good when you leave an interview feeling like you didn’t do your best, but knowing you completely bombed an interview is even worse. Whether you are desperate for a job because your bills are piling up, or you simply really wanted a specific position, the feeling of failure hurts just the same. According to Randall S. Hansen for Quintessential Careers, some of the worst mistakes include being late to the interview, appearing desperate, wearing inappropriate attire, and badmouthing a former boss.There are many different potential interview mistakes. If you really care about the job, it may be worth writing a thank you letter and addressing your mistakes. Even if you don’t get a second chance, you still can learn from your mistakes and do better next time. Most people get nervous and make mistakes at interviews, but you will be more confident once you know what not to do. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Where is the real racism in thoroughbred racing?

first_imgRe Jan. 25 article, “Confederate flags spur talk of racism”: I appreciate National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame’s President John Hendrickson’s state of high dudgeon over recent events at the racing museum. I feel similarly vexed when the powerful privileged unleash wrath and invective on the poor or disenfranchised for doing something that tarnishes the luster of the racing elite. Who is racist here? Is it Saratoga’s elite at the racing museum or the people who draped Confederate flags over the all-white lawn jockeys?  Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Historically, lawn jockeys were painted black. In a nod to political correctness, the museum painted them white — a move they no doubt found highly offensive yet necessary in today’s climate. Doing so again diminished the contributions of minorities to racing.Horse racing has been the sport of the rich and white. The John Hendricksons may be found at the backstretch, but they aren’t humping the hay bales, shoveling manure, grooming horses, or doing any of the physical labor. That’s left to an unseen underclass. Horse racing at Saratoga, as with all tracks, benefits from cheap labor and poor conditions doled out to the poor, mostly people of color. Draping Confederate flags over white lawn jockeys is a welcome nod to racing’s racist past and opens conversation to current treatment of backstretch employees.If John Hendrickson wants to pretend this is an act of vandalism, the district attorney will probably oblige him in his charade. That’s a perk of the powerful. Convincing a jury that an act that damaged nothing and cost nothing is vandalism may be harder.James vanDijkSaratoga Springs More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Schenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

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Dot coms and telecoms scour West End for HQs

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PDI-P nominates bureaucrat Eri Cahyadi for Surabaya mayor

first_img“[The PDI-P] names Eri Cahyadi and Armudji as candidates for Surabaya mayor and deputy mayor for the 2020 to 2025 period,” Puan said on Wednesday. Many supporters of Surabaya Mayor Tri “Risma” Rismaharini, a fellow PDI-P member, have backed Eri to succeed the mayor and continue her work.In January, hundreds of Risma’s supporters declared their support for Eri in the upcoming mayoral race.Prior to his current position, Eri served as the acting head of the Surabaya Open Green Space Agency in 2018. Armudji formerly served as the chairman of Surabaya’s Representative Council.Eri is set to run against former East Java police head Machfud Arifin, who has secured the support of eight political parties, including the Golkar Party, the Gerindra Party, the NasDem Party and the Democratic Party.Machfud recently chose former city-owned tap water company PDAM Surabaya director Mujiaman to be his running mate in the election. (dpk)Topics : The Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P) has nominated Surabaya Development Planning Board head Eri Cahyadi and East Java Representative Council (DPRD) member Armudji to run for Surabaya mayor and deputy mayor respectively in the upcoming election.Puan Maharani, a PDI-P executive, announced the nomination of the two politicians at a press conference on Wednesday, during which the party also announced several other endorsements for the simultaneous regional elections in December.last_img read more

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GE, Noble Corp. in ‘world’s first’ digital drilling rig push

first_imgOffshore driller Noble Corporation and tech giant GE have teamed up and launched what they call “the world’s first digital drilling vessel.”The duo says the project, tested aboard the Noble Globetrotter I drillship, is targeted to achieve 20 percent operational expenditure reduction across the targeted equipment and improve drilling efficiency.“This is a concrete step forward to unlock the immense potential of digital solutions for offshore drilling operations,” GE said in a statement on Thursday.In the offshore drilling industry, operators have long relied on individuals, leading to significant performance inconsistencies and variance. The downturn of the industry has challenged drillers to look for innovative ways to achieve operational excellence, GE said.Bernie Wolford, senior vice president – Operations, Noble Corporation plc.“We are very excited to showcase the launch of the Digital RigSM solution and the world’s first digital drilling vessel as we continue to expand data-driven operations support while gaining significant efficiencies in drilling operations. The potential of digitalization will go beyond a single vessel, opening the door to transforming our entire fleet. The data backbone paves the way towards autonomous drilling, and digital technology is facilitating a new era of drilling and asset performance improvements that are unprecedented.”Predicting equipment failure 2 months ahead According to a statement by GE on Wednesday, the Digital Rig solution, powered by GE’s Predix platform, deployed on the Noble Globetrotter I drilling vessel has been successfully connected to all targeted control systems, including the drilling control network, the power management system and the dynamic positioning system.Data is collected through individual sensors and control systems, harmonized and centralized on the vessel before transmitting in near real time to GE’s Industrial Performance & Reliability Center for predictive analytics. The delivered implementation and analytics on major marine and drilling equipment have already shown promising results, as the Digital Rig solution captured multiple anomalies and has produced alerts to inform potential failures up to two months before they would occur, GE said.The Digital Rig solution combines data models from a digital replica of physical assets, known as a digital twin, along with advanced analytics to detect off-standard behavior, providing an early warning to operators to mitigate a problem before it strikes. Thanks to vessel-wide intelligence, personnel both on the vessel or onshore can gain a holistic view of an entire vessel’s health state and the real-time performance of each piece of equipment onboard, GE said.Through the learning curve, the digital twin will continue to enhance its predictive capability of machine behaviors and ultimately enable predictive maintenance. This means the personnel offshore can now focus their resources on maintenance activities that are truly needed and effective. The result is reduced unplanned downtime, improved revenue and significant maintenance cost savings, GE said. The Digital Rig solution is targeting to deliver up to a 20 percent reduction in operational expenditures across the targeted equipment.“As the digital twin continues to acquire information, we will be able to learn from analytics results, which will shed new light on maintenance effectiveness as well as help us explore other possibilities to further improve drilling efficiency in marine settings,” Andy McKeran, general manager, GE’s Marine Solutions said.The companies will soon start running analytics on equipment’s real-time data on the edge to localize performance improvements and asset intelligence. The remaining three targeted vessels are on schedule to be digitalized for operational optimization early this year.last_img read more

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Free fishing day announced at Big Oaks

first_imgMadison, Ind. — The Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge will hold a “Take a Kid Fishing Day” on Saturday, July 8. From 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. adults and kids 15 and younger can fish for free. The program also includes a casting contest, make your own cane pole, archery and information about reptiles and amphibians.A limited number of free fishing packages will be available along with free refreshments, hotdogs and chips. Some fishing poles will be available for those without equipment. After checking into the refuge office participants will be asked to watch a 20 minute refuge safety video.The event is co-sponsored by the Big Oaks Conservation Society and local merchants. For more information please call 812-273-0783.last_img

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Four local communities receive ORCA funding

first_imgStatewide— Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch along with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs announced that 17 rural Hoosier communities receive more than $10.5 million in federal grant funding.“These collaborations between federal, state and local partners are improving the lives of Hoosiers across the state and strengthening community pride,” Crouch said. “ I applaud this round’s local leadership for their commitment to bettering their communities, as well as their tremendous use of partnerships to address a challenge.”The state of Indiana distributes Community Development Block Grant funds to rural communities to assist units of local government with various community projects such as infrastructure improvement, downtown revitalization, public facilities, and economic development.“We’re thrilled to support such a diverse array of projects in cities and towns throughout rural Indiana,” said Jodi Golden, Executive Director of OCRA. “Communities with reliable infrastructure are positioned for growth and an improved quality of life.”Four communities in the listening area received funding from the federal grant.  They are as follows:—The Main Street Revitalization Program encourages communities with eligible populations to focus on long-term community development efforts. Eligible applicants have a designated active Indiana Main Street group in their community, and the project must be a part of the Main Street’s overall strategy. Main Street Revitalization Program projects include streetscapes, facade renovations and downtown infrastructure rehabilitation.The Town of Hope is awarded $428,360 for a downtown streetscape project. This project removes blighted conditions around the town square by replacing existing streetlamps, adding accessible sidewalks and other improvements that tie the interior and exterior of the square together.—The goals of the Public Facilities Program are to improve the quality of place, generate jobs and spur economic revitalization through improving community facilities or historic preservation projects. Eligible community facilities include fire stations, community centers, daycares, libraries, museums, senior centers, and performance spaces.Jefferson County is awarded $500,000 to replace the fire station used by the Deputy Volunteer Fire Department that was destroyed by fire in December 2018. The project builds an 8,254 square foot station with four bays, training and community rooms to meet the current and future needs of the community.—The Stormwater Improvement Program strives to reduce flooding, to cut stormwater treatment and energy costs, to protect rivers, lakes and vital landscape, and to generate jobs and spur economic revitalization. Types of activities that are eligible for this grant funding include stormwater improvements, as well as demolition and/or clearance.The City of Connersville is awarded $600,000 for stormwater improvements. This project installs 2,710 linear feet of drainage, ten sewer manholes, 2,250 linear feet of curbs and grades as well as 500 linear feet of ditches in two areas of the city to address sewer overflows.—The goals of the Wastewater Drinking Water Program are to protect the health and environment, reduce utility rates for low-to-moderate-income communities and improve rural infrastructure to enable long-term economic growth. Eligible Wastewater Drinking Water Program projects include many aspects of wastewater improvements and drinking water system improvements.The Town of Westport is awarded $700,000 for wastewater system improvements. This project replaces the packaged water treatment plant, replacement of intake, lake, clear well and high service pumps and improves the distribution system by connecting to Decatur County Rural Water.last_img read more

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O’Mahony feels weight of history

first_img The fit-again Munster captain admits it is impossible to ignore the pressure ahead of Ireland’s Six Nations title decider against France in Paris on Saturday. The 24-year-old said he could not watch when Ronan O’Gara’s late drop-goal helped Ireland secure their first Grand Slam since 1948, against Wales in Cardiff back in 2009. “Then you’ve got to try to stay away from the pressure side of things, and not listen to any of the talk about it.” Ireland are confident of breaking their long-running Paris hoodoo as Brian O’Driscoll makes his 141st and final Test appearance. O’Mahony said Ireland will hope routine and reason can help them shrug off the intimidation factor that always creates a daunting Paris atmosphere. “It’s just such a tough place to come and play,” said O’Mahony. “The French are hugely passionate, and a hugely able team, and when they’re at home they’re even stronger again. “It’s a very intimidating place to come and play, it’s one of the toughest stadiums to come and get a win. “That’s the main reason we’ve struggled. “The great thing about this competition is you go week by week. “We’re not looking back on last week, and we’re not looking at momentum. “We’ve taken confidence out of the way we’ve gone about our work and the way we’ve trained this week. “We haven’t talked about us being special nor this game being anything other than what it is. “It’s a cup final for us: we’ve got to get our job roles right from the start tomorrow.” O’Driscoll and Ireland have fought desperately this week to fend off talk of the iconic centre ending his international career in fairytale style with a second Six Nations title. O’Mahony echoed the sentiment, but vowed not to let it unhinge Ireland’s steely focus. “It would be great for Brian, but I think everyone has enough to worry about, about their own jobs,” said O’Mahony. “It’s such a big week for everyone, you have to make sure you’ve got your own things right. “It is an important week for Brian obviously, and it would be great to help him finish on a high, but I’ve got to worry about myself to be honest.” Peter O’Mahony cannot even begin to imagine capping the biggest week of his career with the RBS 6 Nations trophy. The combative loose-forward had just returned to Ireland from Under-20s Six Nations duty, and remembers watching through his fingers at Leinster fly-half Ian Madigan’s house. Half a decade on O’Mahony struggles to contemplate his potential role in history, as Ireland chase just a third win in 42 years in France. “I don’t think I could explain what it would mean, no,” said O’Mahony. “In 2009, we’d just come back from our own Six Nations game, and we watched the game at Ian Madigan’s house. “I remember I couldn’t watch for the last kick, because it meant so much to everyone, so you definitely remember where you were for that one. “Of course the importance comes through, you feel the pressure: without any doubt this is the biggest week of my career so far. “You’re certainly put pressure on yourself, trying to turn it to your favour and use it as motivation. “Since you’re small you want to play in games like this for trophies, it’s the reason the game is so great, to compete for these sorts of trophies. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Twenty-six graduate from NSC/KNVB workshop

first_imgTWENTY-SIX persons were yesterday certified and equipped with the knowledge needed to be more efficient football officials, when they graduated from a five-day course at the National Racquet Centre.The course, which featured both practical and theoretical sessions, was part of a joint partnership between the National Sports Commission, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.During yesterday’s closing ceremony, NSC Director of Sport Christopher Jones stated that events like these are testimony to government’s commitment to moving sport forward.According to Jones, “We want to provide every opportunity for you to excel. Provide you with training; provide you with certification of participation. That is why when the opportunity presented itself, we were only too excited.”“I want to say to you now that this is not a one and lapse, it is essentially the beginning of many more to come,” Jones added, saying that those coaches under the NSC’s ambit must be a part of courses that will enhance their particular discipline.The course was conducted by Andre Simmelink, who works with the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB) in the Netherlands as a football coach instructor and Surinamese Mr Kenneth Jaliens.The participants comprised football coaches, physical education teachers as well as representatives from various youth and sport organisations.Before the conclusion of yesterday’s ceremony, Director of Sport presented the two instructors with tokens of appreciation – medals and specially engraved pens – while the students handed over a framed copy of their first group picture.In response, Simmelink contended that he hopes they take the training received and advance themselves and rather than seeing it as the end of a workshop, they see it as a new avenue through which to blossom.last_img read more

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