BYU Football Adds Louisiana Tech To 2020 Schedule

first_img Tags: BYU Football FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPROVO, Utah-BYU Director of Athletics Tom Holmoe, per a Monday statement, announced an addition to the 2020 football schedule.This game will be against Louisiana Tech Friday October 2 at LaVell Edwards Stadium.The Cougars and the Bulldogs have never met on the gridiron.Louisiana Tech joined Conference USA in 2013 and advanced to what is now known as NCAA FBS Football in 1975.Prior to this, the Bulldogs won three NCAA Division II national championships, in 1972, 1973 and 1974.The Bulldogs, who will commence their season Saturday at Southern Miss, are in their eighth season under Skip Holtz, who is 56-36 (.609) at the helm at Ruston, La.The Bulldogs were coached by one-time BYU football head coach Gary Crowton, who was 21-13 (.618) from 1996-1998 at Louisiana Tech. Crowton later went 26-23 (.531) at BYU from 2001-2004. September 14, 2020 /Sports News – Local BYU Football Adds Louisiana Tech To 2020 Schedule Written by Brad Jameslast_img read more

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Plug Power announces meaningful progress in hydrogen vertical integration strategy

first_imgIn line with this green hydrogen strategy, Plug Power is also pursuing the acquisition of an electrolyzer company Plug Power is in advanced negotiations to acquire United Hydrogen. (Credit: Pixabay/Adam Radosavljevic) Plug Power Inc. (NASDAQ: PLUG), a leading provider of hydrogen engines and fueling solutions enabling e-mobility, is pursuing transactions to acquire United Hydrogen Group Inc. and an electrolyzer technology platform company. Both acquisitions are in line with Plug Power’s overall green hydrogen business strategy to have over 50% of hydrogen be green by 2024 and, if successfully completed, are expected to enhance Plug Power’s capabilities in hydrogen generation, liquefaction and logistics business.Plug Power is in advanced negotiations to acquire United Hydrogen. Plug Power owns a convertible bond in United Hydrogen, which could represent over 30% equity ownership on a converted basis. United Hydrogen is the first independent company that brings a full suite of experience in production, distribution and logistics of liquid hydrogen, similar to industrial gas companies. If completed, the acquisition is expected to be accretive immediately and to have a meaningful positive impact on Plug Power’s cost of hydrogen, especially as the Company goes into 2021 and beyond.Today, United Hydrogen produces 6.4 tons of hydrogen daily with plans to increase to 10 tons daily in the near future, and with goals of further expansion. This 6.4 tons of daily liquid hydrogen generation capacity has a low carbon footprint as it uses by-product hydrogen from chlor alkali plants. Plug Power’s hydrogen vertical integration strategy is designed to make hydrogen fuel ubiquitous while controlling fuel cost and turning this into a cash flow generating business.“Plug Power will continue to work with its existing suppliers and also look to build more strategic partnerships as the Company’s demand for hydrogen is expected to increase substantially,” said Andy Marsh, Plug Power CEO. “Plug Power projects its hydrogen demand to increase four-fold to over 85 tons of hydrogen a day by 2024 – up from over 27 tons per day today. In addition, the Company plans for over 50% of that to be green hydrogen.”In line with this green hydrogen strategy, Plug Power is also pursuing the acquisition of an electrolyzer company. If the acquisition is completed, this technology platform is expected to provide Plug Power access to a range of electrolyzer products from 100kW to 1MW+. In addition, Plug Power’s manufacturing scale and experience is expected to allow for rapid scaleup of this product line. Plug Power has a growing pipeline of opportunities with its customers where the value proposition works well with electrolyzer technology today. In addition, this technology is expected to allow for Plug Power to expand its addressable market opportunity into other industrial applications. Leveraging electrolyzer and low-cost renewable power is key to a green hydrogen economy and is in line with our stated goal of having over 50% of hydrogen to be green by 2024. According to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, the cost of green hydrogen is expected to decline by over 50% by 2030.Marsh continues, “We expect that both of these acquisitions would provide Plug Power with comprehensive skill sets in the entire hydrogen value chain and pave the way for going from low-carbon to zero-carbon hydrogen as we continue to focus on building the hydrogen economy.”Plug Power has not yet entered into a definitive acquisition agreement with either acquisition target and both transactions are subject to the completion and execution of customary definitive documents and satisfaction of customary closing conditions. While Plug Power cannot guarantee that either acquisition will be completed, based on the current state of negotiations and transaction process, the company expects both acquisitions can be completed by the end of the second quarter of 2020. Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

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Tacky or stroke of genius? Developer uses reality TV celebs to sell flats

first_imgHome » News » Land & New Homes » Tacky or stroke of genius? Developer uses reality TV celebs to sell flats previous nextLand & New HomesTacky or stroke of genius? Developer uses reality TV celebs to sell flatsHouse builder Avanton has given half a dozen social media influencers, models and reality TV stars a freebie in return – hopefully – for an endorsement from their combined five million followers.Nigel Lewis3rd November 20201 Comment1,780 Views Developer Avanton is claiming a first for property marketing after asking celebrity TV stars and influencers to endorse its new luxury apartment block on social media after an overnight ‘test drive’.An assortment of bright young things, including Love Island star Eyal Booker (below), Made in Chelsea TV star Jemima Rhys and Kate Moss’s younger sister Lottie (above) were put up at the recently finished Coda in Battersea and plied with food and champagne.The next morning, the company asked for their opinion about what aspect of the apartment they liked best.With a combined social media following of at least five million people, the guests should appeal to potential first-time buyers and young couples interested in the 130 apartments, says Avanton, which boast 24-hour concierge, hotel-style foyer, club lounge, gymnasium, landscaped gardens, and a new global headquarters for the Royal Academy of Dance.Value for money?Despite the marketing budget for the event costing the equivalent of repeat advertisements in a series of national newspapers and luxury magazines, the company believes it was well-worth it.Avaton reckons that London is playing catch up with Los Angeles, Miami, Monaco and New York where celebrity and influencer social media-driven property marketing is more common.Says sales and marketing director David Ronson: “This type of celebrity endorsement and influencer marketing doesn’t replace traditional advertising and marketing, but for us it is a very effective way of reaching our target buyers and also promoting the development during a time when we cannot do large launch events or functions.”Prices at Coda start from £750,000 for a two-bedroom apartment; more than 50 apartments and penthouses have been sold or reserved, with the final phase of the build programme scheduled for completion in 2021.More: Can social media ever be more important than portal advertising?lottie moss celebrity properties social media marketing Avanton celebrity November 3, 2020Nigel LewisOne commentAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 3rd November 2020 at 5:23 pmSpeaking as an influencer, Avanton have invested wisely, micro-influencers have anything between 200 and 20,000 fans, and it is the quality of who those fans or connections are. Beckham has 45M a big number, but he is not really attached to them, with smaller numbers you can have closer personal connection and influence.Recently, Gymshark – the gym clothing company set up in 2012 by Ben Francis, reported revenue approaching 160M.The company was built on Ben giving his clothing to influencers who wore it, analysis now shows that 49% of consumers rely on influencers to help them ‘buy’ the right thing, with a 9.3 x’s ROI.If you look at LinkedIN alone there are nearly 200 influencer jobs advertised daily, it is becoming a boom sector, all you need is to be the trusted voice or face in the sector. Traditional advertising, especially property is ad nauseum, the same groundhog pattern of high repeat spend – digital influencers are a cheaper and more effective voice. Trust me.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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Major League Show Jumping Tour Comes to Traverse City

first_imgMore from News:MARS Bromont CCI Announces Requirements For US-Based RidersThe first set of requirements to allow American athletes and support teams to enter Canada for the June 2-6 competition have been released.Canadian Eventer Jessica Phoenix Reaches the 100 CCI4*-S MarkPhoenix achieved the milestone while riding Pavarotti at the inaugural 2021 CCI4*-S at the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event.Tribunal Satisfied That Kocher Made Prolonged Use of Electric SpursAs well as horse abuse, the US rider is found to have brought the sport into disrepute and committed criminal acts under Swiss law.Washington International Horse Show Returns to TryonTIEC will again provide the venue for the WIHS Oct. 26-31 with a full schedule of hunter, jumper and equitation classes. Tags: Major League Show Jumping, Traverse City Horse Shows, Horse Sport Enews We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition!center_img Email* SIGN UP The management team at Traverse City Horse Shows is thrilled to announce the addition of the Major League Show Jumping tour to its exciting lineup of 2021 events, thanks to the support of Traverse City Tourism. In its inaugural year, the Major League Show Jumping (MLSJ) tour will bring two of its ten 5* events to Traverse City, Michigan, running concurrently with the Great Lakes Equestrian Festival (GLEF) and the 51st Anniversary of the American Gold Cup (AGC). Highlighted during GLEF will be the $230,000 TraverseCity.com Grand Prix CSI5*.Hosted at North America’s premier equestrian venues, the 2021 Major League Show Jumping tour will feature 8 teams of 6 high performance show jumping athletes from across the globe, and will offer over $6 million dollars in prize money throughout the ten events. In addition to the two events hosted in Traverse City, the Major League Show Jumping tour will travel to Canada, Mexico and California at some of the most renowned venues such as Thunderbird Show Park, Bromont Olympic Parc, the Otomí Equestrian Center, Club Hípico La Silla, the Empire Polo Club, Desert International Horse Park and the Angelstone Tournaments Venue.“The Major League Show Jumping tour is an exciting addition to what will already be a great year at the Flintfields Horse Park venue,” manager Matthew Morrissey said. “The event would not have been possible without the support of Traverse City Tourism. We know MLSJ competitors will fall in love with everything Traverse City has to offer, and the tour will be just one more reason why Traverse City is the place to be during the summer months! We are thrilled to be able to offer this world class event with such a meaningful local partner.”Easily accessible from most major destinations in the United States, Traverse City has become a beloved tourist destination for equestrians and vacationers alike. In addition to the Traverse City Horse Shows series’ offerings, Traverse City itself boasts activities for the entire family to enjoy, like Sleeping Bear Dunes, days on the lake, countless dining options downtown, and even happy hours at local breweries and wineries.Traverse City Tourism President and CEO, Trevor Tkach, commented, “Traverse City Horse Shows has set the bar with its high-caliber events and beautiful venue, and our region loves hosting the equestrian community. We couldn’t be more thrilled to continue our partnership to help bring this exciting, fun event to our destination.”last_img read more

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Video: Oxford Union Protests

first_imgCherwell reports from outside and around the Union on the protests surrounding the free speech forum. On the scene: Selena Wisnom, Tom Carpenter, Dan Millichip and Rhiannon Nicolson See also: Interview with Luke Tryllast_img

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Finding a sense of place

first_imgFresh off the plane in May to begin an overseas internship, I knew nothing of the life I would be entering except for the vague recollections of history classes, faded maps, and perhaps the line or two from the movie “EuroTrip.” The immaculate cobblestones lining the streets of Geneva’s Old Town were a long way from the hustle of my hometown. Swept up in the chaos of interns overrunning the staid city, it was almost impossible to resist the infectious European carelessness, the joie de vivre, the low voices and clinks of wine glasses, infused altogether with a Swiss meticulousness and precision.Later, after stumbling off a red-eye to New York, frantically re-packing for my Harvard classes in September, and just barely surviving my sophomore fall, I wouldn’t have been at all surprised if my roommate thought I were utterly out of my mind, delusional even, to be thinking about returning overseas. The Europe that I left behind — groaning under the weight of its cultural history — pulled at my heart just as my continuing work with the World Health Organization (WHO) demanded attention from my brain.A week of requisite pleading with the “authorities” (read: family), email exchanges with my WHO supervisors, and a phone call to the Harvard professor sponsoring this entire experience, and I was on the next flight out of Kennedy Airport, just a day after my last Harvard final.The familiarity, the return to the idiosyncrasies of the Swiss, kept me smiling, from boarding the plane through my confident zigzag through Geneva’s airport. “Damn it,” I almost said aloud as I saw the bus rumbling away from the stop; it would be almost 20 minutes until the next one. And I was back.As quickly as you could say bonjour, I fell back into the rhythms of work, bagged lunches, and commuting. The WHO, which sits at the top of a hill overlooking the city and the lake, is a curious place. A Kafkaesque expanse of office cubicles, the WHO is a world unto itself, the gatekeeper to nearly all international health policymaking, and an entity that is part of, yet distinct from, the traditional United Nations umbrella. The intern experience at the WHO can be jarring. And the familiar complaints have some measure of truth. The bureaucracy is overwhelming, and the pace of progress often undetectable.But if there is one role in which the WHO yet commands a begrudging respect, largely free from the political skirmishes that underlie its policy efforts, it is in research and information gathering. Unimaginably large volumes of research, from every corner of the world, collected dutifully by national and regional offices, flow into the Geneva headquarters and are synthesized into reports and memos.Perhaps wisely, the niche that I carved out for myself over the summer was within this realm. Back at my desk, decorated with the same posters, running Stata, and reconciling revisions from people across the department, it was as if I had never left. “So, America, Thomas, are you ever going back?” a Swede sitting across from me asked, a few days after I had returned. The corridor was quieter than usual, as the great diaspora of U.N. employees to their home countries for the holidays was reaching its peak. I laughed and mumbled an “unclear,” getting up to grab another coffee.“Unclear.” I repeated the word when meeting with my Harvard sponsor, a professor at the Medical School, as I reflected on my experience at the WHO and thought about where I wanted to be in five or 10 years. I had learned an incredible amount, with substantive results to show from my work, and had developed a deep rapport with my supervisors. I knew I would always be welcome if I should return. But that part of me wanting to see more of the world, to see the most pernicious of issues touched on during my stay, to always challenge and question received understandings and beliefs, kept me from providing a definitive answer.And Europe, I could not forget Europe. Perhaps I wouldn’t return to the U.N. until I could have more impact on its operations, but I knew I would return to this continent. My January Experience challenged, but also reaffirmed, that strange affinity I had discovered over the summer, re-painting in more realistic hues the glorious warm-weather renditions of new places and people. January taught me to be a more careful and meticulous scientist, a sharper scholar; and J-term reminded me of how beautiful — and transient — a sense of place feels.On the last day of my January Experience, after the requisite goodbyes and haphazard packing of binders and textbooks, I stood in front of the main building, staring one last time at the towering expanse of glass. And perhaps it was my imagination, but for the first time, I noticed my reflection — multiplied infinitely across the panels and windows — and had an overwhelming sense of déjà vu, as if I were home.Cheers to Europe; and cheers to Harvard, for opening my eyes. Á votre santé! If you’re an undergraduate or graduate student and have an essay to share about life at Harvard, please email your ideas to Jim Concannon, the Gazette’s news editor, at [email protected]last_img read more

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U.S. honors Cherry Murray

first_imgCherry A. Murray, dean of the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), will receive the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the White House announced today.The medal is one of the nation’s top honors for achievement and leadership in the advancement of science and technology. Recipients are leaders who have made lasting contributions to America’s competitiveness and quality of life and have helped strengthen the nation’s technological workforce.“These scholars and innovators have expanded our understanding of the world, made invaluable contributions to their fields, and helped improve countless lives,” President Obama said in a statement. “Our nation has been enriched by their achievements, and by all the scientists and technologists across America dedicated to discovery, inquiry, and invention.”Murray, who also is the John A. and Elizabeth S. Armstrong Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences and professor of physics, joined the Harvard faculty in July 2009 after a prominent career as an executive at Bell Laboratories and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.A celebrated experimentalist, Murray is well known for her scientific accomplishments using light scattering, an experimental technique in which photons are fired at a specified target. Scientists can then gather insights into surface physics and photonic behavior by analyzing the spray of photons in various directions from such collisions.Her research has also addressed topics relating to soft condensed matter and complex fluids, hybrid materials that show the properties of different phases of matter. The control of suspensions, foams, and emulsions is relevant to the development of, for example, drug delivery systems and “lab-on-a-chip” devices.Among other diverse topics in condensed-matter physics, Murray has studied nanostructures, phase transitions, optical phenomena in semiconductors, and controlled self-assembly of optical materials — all critical for the advancement of quantum optics, engineered semiconductors, and tools such as optical tweezers.Born in Fort Riley, Kan., the daughter of a diplomat, Murray lived in the United States, Japan, Pakistan, South Korea, and Indonesia as a child. She received her B.S. in 1973 and her Ph.D. in physics in 1978 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has published more than 70 papers in peer-reviewed journals and holds two patents in near-field optical data storage and optical display technology.Murray was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1999, to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001, and to the National Academy of Engineering in 2002. She has served on more than 80 national and international scientific advisory committees, governing boards, and National Research Council panels. In 2010–11 she served on the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. She is currently a member of the U.S. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board and serves on the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories.The medal program was created by statute in 1980 and is administered for the White House by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Patent and Trademark Office. Murray will receive the medal at a White House ceremony later this year.last_img read more

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Harvard professor brought first Christmas tree to New England

first_img An enduring Christmas groove Related This story, which originally appeared Dec. 12, 1996, was written by Gazette staff writer Ken Gewertz.This December, as tree lot attendants load the fragrant, streamlined shapes of netted firs and spruces onto auto roof-racks and count out change with fingers numbed by cold, it would be well to remember that 1996 is the 200th birthday of the man who brought the tradition of the decorated Christmas tree to New England.That man was Charles Follen (1796-1840), and besides introducing the Christmas tree at a party at his Cambridge home in 1832, he lived an eventful life filled with varied accomplishments (including a 10-year stint as a Harvard professor) and marked by a passionate devotion to the cause of liberty.“Follen has left us a legacy of social action based on the principle of freedom. It’s a principle that we continue to test ourselves against,” said Lucinda Duncan, minister of the Follen Community Church of East Lexington, the church that Follen founded in 1839.Born in Darmstadt, Germany, Follen came of age under the influence of the Napoleonic Wars and their repressive aftermath. He and his generation saw French domination come to an end, only to be replaced by a resumption of aristocratic rule instituted by the Congress of Vienna.Idealistic youths like Follen found the situation intolerable and expressed their displeasure by organizing themselves into revolutionary student organizations and agitating for reform. When the movement split into two factions, Follen, a very vocal student leader, remained solidly with the more radical group, calling for the overthrow of the government, by violent means if necessary.In the midst of this turmoil, Follen managed to earn a law degree from the University of Giessen and soon afterward became a lecturer at the University of Jena, but his revolutionary past caught up with him.When a conservative author named Kotzebue was assassinated, Follen was twice arrested and tried for conspiracy in the murder, but the authorities could find no evidence against him. However, fearful for his liberty and his life, Follen thought it best to flee the country. He went to Basel, then Paris, and finally came to America.After less than a year spent learning English and “networking,” Follen landed a job at Harvard in 1825 as the College’s first German teacher. He doubled as the instructor of a subject that was then coming into vogue, gymnastics. Later, he added history and ethics to this busy teaching schedule.Follen found the freedom of American society immensely refreshing and flourished in his adopted country. In 1828 he married Eliza Lee Cabot, one of the brahmanic Boston Cabots, who, in a famous quip, are said to talk only to God.Through Eliza, he got to know some of Boston’s most celebrated figures, including William Ellery Channing, a leading Unitarian minister. Under Channing’s influence, Follen began studying for the ministry and soon embarked on a preaching career in addition to his duties at Harvard.The year 1830 was a significant one for Follen. It was the year he became a naturalized citizen of the United States and the year his son, Charles Christopher Follen, was born. This young man’s arrival was probably the chief factor leading to Follen’s introduction of the Christmas tree.The event took place in December 1832. That is the date of a description by Harriet Martineau, an English Unitarian and journalist who was visiting Boston at the time.Follen, remembering the German Christmases of his youth and wishing to recreate the magic and beauty of a decorated tree for his young son, went out into the woods near his home and cut down a small fir.The tree was set in a tub and its branches hung with small dolls, gilded eggshells, and paper cornucopias filled with candied fruit. The tree was illuminated with numerous candles.Martineau describes the unveiling of the tree at the Follens’ Christmas party: “It really looked beautiful; the room seemed in a blaze, and the ornaments were so well hung on that no accident happened, except that one doll’s petticoat caught fire. There was a sponge tied to the end of a stick to put out any supernumerary blaze, and no harm ensued. I mounted the steps behind the tree to see the effect of opening the doors. It was delightful. The children poured in, but in a moment every voice was hushed. Their faces were upturned to the blaze, all eyes wide open, all lips parted, all steps arrested.”Follen was not the first person in America to have a Christmas tree. Decorated trees had been seen in Pennsylvania in the 1820s, and there are reports that Hessian soldiers fighting for the British during the Revolution set up Christmas trees in their encampments. But there is good evidence that Follen was the first person to bring the decorated tree to New England and, after he set the example, the custom spread. The year the National Christmas Tree Association projects sales of 37 million trees. To this day, the Follen Community Church commemorates his introduction of the Christmas tree by lighting a tree on its front lawn as well as selling Christmas trees in the lot across the street to raise funds for church programs.And according to Duncan, the church also strives to remain true to Follen’s example as a social activist, an example that showed no sign of diminishing as Follen matured. As an American, Follen took up the fight against slavery as ardently as he had once fought against the injustices of European despots.His uncompromising abolitionist principles once lost him a job as pastor of All Souls Church in New York City, and his outspoken stand against slavery at a time when abolition was still highly controversial, even in Massachusetts, may have ended his teaching career. Harvard did not renew his professorship in 1835, but did offer to employ him as a German instructor, at a reduced salary. Supporters, including his wife and the abolitionist poet John Greenleaf Whittier, later said that it was his outspoken views that cost him his Harvard position.Relieved of his teaching duties, Follen became a free agent. He wrote, preached, and lectured widely, traveling as far afield as Chicago. In 1839, he received an invitation to preach to a small congregation in East Lexington.Follen accepted, but left after a short while to take a more lucrative position as tutor to a family in Watertown. To fill his position, he recommended a young renegade Unitarian minister named Ralph Waldo Emerson.Follen returned when the congregation came up with the money to hire him full time and to build its own church. He designed the octagonal church which still stands, laid out so that the minister would not be elevated above his parishioners.Tragically, Follen did not live to preach in the church which bears his name. He was killed in 1840 at the age of 44 in a fire on board the steamship Lexington while crossing Long Island Sound.“He was really a man who left a mark on this congregation,” said Duncan. “He had a vision of a free Christian church where all people could come and speak their minds. It was an idea that was way ahead of its time.” ‘Charlie Brown’ soundtrack, now 50, hasn’t lost the power to inspire last_img read more

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U.S. Banks Aren’t Seen as ‘Stupid’ Enough to Invest in Trump’s Coal Program

first_imgU.S. Banks Aren’t Seen as ‘Stupid’ Enough to Invest in Trump’s Coal Program FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Global Trade Review:Obama’s flagship policy was intended to restrict carbon dioxide emissions and has been under attack from the Republican Party since it came into being in 2014.Now, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Scott Pruitt, has signed an order to scrap the plan, in a bid to boost the country’s coal industry. But experts say that banks that have moved away from coal financing are unlikely to use this as an excuse to go back.“I think they’ll give it consideration but at the end of the day I would be very skeptical that the rollback will have any long-term implications. The reality is the average wind or solar project is costing US$20 per MWh. Could you build a new coal plant for that price? No, it would cost you about US$50 per MWh for gas even,” Tim Buckley, director of energy finance studies at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, tells GTR.He adds: “I can’t see why any US bank is going to turn on a dime and support the Trump plan knowing he might be gone in three years. He’s gone, and you won’t even have built the plant, you’re left with a 40-year stranded asset. It would be stupid.”Over the last few years, a number of large banks have restricted their financing for the coal industry. Deutsche Bank earlier this year committed to ending financing of new coal mining and new coal-fired power plant construction. ING made a similar pledge, but much earlier. The likes of JP Morgan and the Bank of America Merrill Lynch made less sweeping commitments, but pledged to limit their credit exposure to coal.Only ING responded to GTR’s request for fresh comment around whether the stance of the US government would shape their internal policy on coal. The bank says that on the contrary, it expects to accelerate its withdrawal from the sector.“What we can do is adopt a core policy, but we can’t do it all by ourselves, we need government support as well. That’s why we’ve been for years calling for a strong climate accord. We have called for a price for carbon, an end to fossil fuel subsidy and for energy efficiency. We need that as a bank to enable us to incorporate risks into our risk models. We need to price carbon to incorporate carbon pricing into our risk models. We need companies to disclose their carbon footprints to understand the indirect effect we have on society through that carbon footprint,” says the bank’s head of business ethics, Arnaud Cohen Stuart.“Governments can have an important role to increase our leverage on the global agenda. There is a need for a strong accord and we support that. But at the same time we have to take our own responsibility. Regardless of what COP23 will look like, we feel that we don’t need to finance new thermal coal and we intend to accelerate decreasing our exposure,” he adds.Trump’s bullish support of the US coal industry led to a 58% rise in coal exports over the first quarter of this year. This was also facilitated by a decline in coal production in China, which led to greater demand for US coal.However, the boom is likely to be short term and anomalous in the long-term decline of coal. More countries are weaning themselves off burning carbon, while others, such as India, are consuming more of their own product at the expense of imports. The US fossil fuel industry, which funded and supported the Trump campaign vociferously, may be content with the short-term improvement but is acceptant of coal’s fate.In a recent presentation for shareholders, the largest private sector coal company in the world, Peabody Energy, said that it expects 10GW of coal-fired plant retirements per year going forward.“There’s huge scope for the utilisation rate of remaining coal-fired plants to go up to the extent power demand is there, but when you continue to see plant closures, your industry is in terminal decline. Demand has been flat for decades. You’re still seeing 20GW of renewables being built, a net 10GW of gas being built each year. Once you build renewables, there’s a zero margin cost of supply. It will always win the fight,” Buckley says.More: Trump scraps Obama’s climate legacy, but banks unlikely to followlast_img read more

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42 certified as Credit Union Business Lending Professionals

first_imgForty-two credit union professionals earned their Credit Union Business Lending Professional designation (CUBLP) at this year’s CUNA Business Lending Certification School. This designation is awarded to attendees after they complete and pass all exams at the three year program.“This program is amazing for any credit union that is involved in Commercial Business Loans,” said Tricia Medert, business service analyst at Pathways FCU.CUNA Business Lending Certification School equips attendees with business lending essentials, strategies to innovate lending programs and so much more.Save the date for the next CUNA Business Lending Certification School which takes place July 20-23, 2020 in Madison, Wis. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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